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Europe’s Greek Moment


#1

Europe’s Greek Moment

Yanis Varoufakis

It took German Chancellor Angela Merkel two long years to visit President Obama. She eventually arrived at the White House this June. After considerable pomp and ceremony, the two leaders sat down at the Oval Office for two hours to discuss the most pressing world affairs. After the meeting, their press secretaries surprised people by saying the leaders of the West’s two most powerful nations had spent one hour and forty-five minutes on Greece (with the remaining fifteen minutes spent debating intervention in Libya).


#2

Congratulations! Glad to see you here on CD.

Wish you would have stayed in the government, but perhaps you can accomplish more outside of it.

Godspeed to you all as you stand tall.


#3

Absolutely! Perfectly said polarbear4


#4

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#6

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#7

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#8

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#9

One point to remember as time unfolds; the US government is a fake democracy fronting for a military empire and the US military is an occupying force here in the US just as it is where ever it goes. There is very little positive about the US government.

The collapse of officially commandeered partisan democracy in the US is a coast to coast phenomena; voter participation in California was so low that the current governor won with 18% of voting age population, meanwhile, on the eastern coast, 13% turned out for the partisan primary election to select candidates, approximately 3% selected the eventual governor of Massachusetts as a candidate.

Yet, when a referendum involving a clear environmental choice occurs, the turnout is as much or more than the wonderful Greek XOI, with victory margins as high as 91%.

I am sure, Yanis, that you are aware that the young in the US are in similar dire straights as in Greece. The IMF may sound more reasonable than its European partners but US students are bound into debt slavery by conscious policy. And healing regional democracies are regularly destroyed with grotesque terrorism by the US government no matter which party is in power. Haiti, Honduras, Venezuela, Guatemala, Panama, Costa Rica, Ecuador and Bolivia are all abused by North American corporatism.

Millions throughout the Americas are thrilled by your willingness to face mighty foes and secure breathing room for the people of Greece. We have the exact same austerity problem in the US, Brasil and México; elite servants of immortal corporate monsters who turn the joy of life into accounting digits simply purchase the president and the congress, they secure tax favors and rules that allow wanton pollution, environmental destruction and a cancer epidemic. Governments borrows billions to give business to corporatistas and the people are expected to pay. The Greek predicament is the same as in the US except that the US is and always has been a terrorist empire committing genocide after genocide, some on the scale of Nazi Germany.

Now we in the US have a federal election on the horizon, a popular candidate seeks to lure the people into a revolution under his candidacy; Bernie is good, yet he is a democrat, though if he wins there are perhaps 160 out of 500 in Congress who will align with him as independent thinkers. The problem is that democrats periodically steal the awakening of the people for the election and then leave the people hanging in the wind. Zapatistas know this same problem in México, the politicians promise the world for the election and then forget your name when the election is over.

So what will we do to synchronize solidarity with the people of the Americas, Greece and Europe? There are nascent ideas without cohesion. We have technology to build democracy outside the idea of a nation, as advocated by some very strong Kurds, and here in the US we have approximately fourteen months to do it, even as we support Bernie. The corporations are global, ναί, yes, yet biology is a facet of big still banging equal with galaxies and gravity, and democracy is the way human biology focuses distributed intelligence. You have exercised the referendum, my impression is Greece will need to do it again and again, soon. You, the loathed one, are independent and can help do this until the common folk have formulated deep understanding and a plan. I believe that is the way cosmic powered biology expressed as human does politics in the information age; we will grow in ability to distill the distributed intelligence of billions, and when we do, the corporatistas and their armies will retreat again and again until the quest for more money is replaced by the joy of life and fun.

Bien venidos para ti, amigo mío,

Garrett


#10

The no vote makes millions feel better, to have reason to hope. What it has done is to create an open debate about how our banking system should function in a democratic society or societies. To whom and to what are such institution accountable. But I think the no vote goes beyond the battle between banks and people. It raises the issue of hegemons and the integrity of national borders and the rights of people within them. It raises the question of international law and to what extent the hegemons are accountable to it. Are the powerful to be allowed to choose when they are subject to it and when they are free to ignore it. The no vote showed the courage of the Greeks. The hope is that it is contagious.


#11

I don't get it--what is Europe's real crisis of which debt is only a symptom and what is its grand failure in dealing with the crisis?