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Even if Sanders Wins the Popular Vote, Clinton Could Still Get the Nomination


#1

Even if Sanders Wins the Popular Vote, Clinton Could Still Get the Nomination

Trevor Timm

Many people on Twitter expressed surprise that Hillary Clinton basically walked away with the same amount of total delegates as Bernie Sanders after the New Hampshire primary Tuesday night, despite the decisive 20-plus-point rout by Sanders.


#3

Until this benighted political party divests itself of the deeply anti-democratic device of "superdelegates," I'm going to refer to it as "The Democratic (sic) Party."


#4

A super(delegate) switch is a great way to further Republicanize the Democratic Party. What a great way to further disenfranchise the electorate. The elite sure have a lot of shitty tricks to pull out of their back pockets--close to the source and all...


#5

Republicans do it too but they don't call their equivalents - Superdelegates.

Amazingly enough, we see this article written by Brit about America. Thanks to the Guardian and to CD for publishing it.

People need to make this issue a two edged sword risk for those who try to make oligarchy's status quo take control of our democracy. And here we were thinking our votes count like they used to. What is even the point of having a primary?

This is like the electoral college version for primaries and nominating a candidate isn't it? An elite circumvents what the people may choose.

Instant mayhem were they to do this and undercut people's choice. You'd almost have to ask whether they are insane if they tried to do this.


#8

Can you imagine what would be the response of people towards not only the perfidious democrats but towards our government and more if this trick was tried?

That'd be scary I think. People need to have faith that the game is still basically honest even if rigged here and there.


#9

Or maybe "The Demon-cratic Party"


#10

The GOP, however, will not deny Trump the nomination if he wins the overall primary series. Although Trump said he would not run as a third party candidate, he will have an excuse to do so if they deny him the GOP nomination. Trump running third party will assure a GOP loss in November. The GOP's highest priority is winning the White House whereas the highest priority for the Democrats is sustaining corporate cash flow, not winning the November election.


#11

Seeing how black lives really won't matter if Clinton or Trump moves into the White House in 2017, black leaders do indeed need to make supporting Bernie their highest priority.


#12

For this rigging to change, the Democratic Party needs to get into rehab. post haste and kick their 30 year addiction to corporate cash. Wasn't it Neil Young who sang "every junkies like the settin sun" ?


#13

Well, isn't that dandy! When is comes to superdelegates the Republican party is more democratic than the Democratic Party.


#15

So, Billary Clintonian is just fine that Al Gore was cheated out of an election after winning the popular vote.

He is in her party. Maybe Trump could do that to her. Tread lightly, Lady Wallstreet, tread lightly.


#16

What do you think of the idea of putting public pressure via SM and letter-writing campaigns, to all of the super-delegates from/representing your local area, in terms of impact?


#17

The Democratic Party superdelegates would rather see Trump win than Bernie Sanders in a presidential race because ultimately it is about corporate friendly policies. If Sanders wins the popular vote in the primaries, the superdelegates will bribe, threaten and coerce enough of the other delegates to ensure that HRC is "their man in Washington" inadvertently handing the Republicans the presidency. This precedent has a long history. When the popular Henry Wallace, Roosevelt's Vice President, was deemed 'too socialist' back in 1945 by the Democratic Party and jettisoned in favor of the naive, pliable and relatively unknown Harry S. Truman, similar 'special interest groups within the Democratic party exerted their undemocratic power. Though Sanders is not as far left as Henry Wallace was, the U.S. as a whole has shifted a lot to the right since 1945. The current 'establishment' finds Sanders just as despicable as Henry Wallace was in the eyes of the 1% in 1945.
The additional 1,351 delegates required to win the day at the DNC, will be aggressively lobbied by the 700 corporate loyalists ( or 'superdelegates') on the floor who will be making promises to anyone who will listen to get the majority of delegates they need to appoint HRC as their choice. Unfortunately most delegates have a narrow agenda, such as a desire to keep a particular local defense contractor happy or to prevent the closure of a military base in their State as an example. Therefore the corporate minions we call "super delegates" will exploit the other delegates' weaknesses by promising to meet their demands in return for their unconditional support for HRC. Though the general public will be outraged at the usurping of the 'peoples choice', corporate America won't give a damn and a pliant, corporate dependant MSM will be relied on to pacify the populace as business goes on as usual. It is the final safety valve (barring violence) of the 1% to make sure that their financial interests are left intact.
Unless at least 2,351 delegates choose to hold their ground and break free of the corporate stranglehold on our country, all of the "King's horses and all of the King's men, won't be able to put Bernie back together again."


#18

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#21

I doubt if the people who came up with the superdelagate idea anticipated that a leading candidate would be someone who decided to become a Democrat just to run in the primary. If you have two candidates, one with a long history of a being a Democrat the other with no history of being a Democrat until the primary, then it could appear unfair as you would expect almost all the superdelegates to support the candidate with a long history as a member of the Democratic Party. This is one the obstacles Sanders might have to overcome since he chose not to be a Democrat for so many years. It is unlikely to play a role in the final outcome but it might turn out to be the deciding factor.


#22

If Sanders keeps winning the popular vote in the primaries and the superdelegates counter the popular vote and nominate Hillary, many Sanders supporters could abandon the Democratic Party in the general election. Contradicting the popular primary vote would be very risky. Sanders is a hard pill to swallow for the Democratic establishment and perhaps they would take the undemocratic gamble. The telling of the superdelegate story now is a ploy to get Sanders supporters to moan in despair and give up because the Democratic Party establishment has rigged the primary outcome months ago. Here is another good article on this that encourages to not be scared by the bogeymen superdelegate story. I can't put a link in my post. The story is in pastemagazine.


#23

While it is possible for super delegates to hand Clinton the election despite Sanders winning the popular vote, I find this highly unlikely. To do so would hand the general election to the Republicans. Those who voted for Bernie, as I plan to do in Missouri's primary, would be so furious that enough would refuse to support Clinton to hand the election to the Republicans. While I find the Democrats tone-deaf, centrists, that are mere Republican-lite, I don't think they are stupid enough to throw away the presidency. I guess only time will tell.


#24

MoveOn petition demanding all Dem superdelegates support the will of the voters:
http://pac.petitions.moveon.org/sign/tell-the-democratic-superdel

Share this around!


#25

The bigger question is will the public stand for the obvious political chicanery and how ironic if the mass distribution of firearms in America was what enabled a Sanders Vs Trump election.


#26

Which is why I was I was opening up the idea of public shaming to coerce super-delegates and threaten their positions and party. The world may be collapsing (at least locally) but I bet the secrecy and lack of repercussions has a lot to do with their complacency.