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Experts Call Toxic Spill in Vancouver a 'Warning' Against Fossil Fuel Projects


#1

Experts Call Toxic Spill in Vancouver a 'Warning' Against Fossil Fuel Projects

Nadia Prupis, staff writer

In the wake of a toxic fuel spill in Vancouver's English Bay this week, criticism of the emergency response and questions over the potential impacts of a proposed tar sands pipeline expansion through the area came from climate and shipping experts alike.

Jessica Wilson, head of Greenpeace Canada's Arctic campaign, said on Thursday that the spill should serve as a warning against fossil fuel development in the area.


#3

Private concentrated wealth has to be ended. No one is worth 300 times another. Picketty was spot on right. At least a 50% marginal tax rate worldwide with no loopholes. Medicare for all worldwide. Control technology don't let it be used to control us. We don't need driver-less cars and personal drones. Bigger, faster and computerized does not support or aid humanity. It dehumanizes everyone. And enables tyranny.


#4

Harper and his corporate energy spin-meisters (Kinder Morgan front and center) are sequestered while they hunker down to create a media blitz fashioned along the lines of BP to cover up any environmental damage brought by this spill (two TONS of highly toxic tar sands S- - T) and downplay any after-effects. Perhaps they will have a happy sunshine face emblazoned throughout their "public service announcement." Their total disregard for the health of marine life, the people, the water/soil/air is beyond nefarious...it is downright demonic. All for money, money, money.


#6

Meanwhile, Obama is in Panama touting 12,000 jobs created by another billion dollar Boeing deal that insures opulent global air travel. Why, what else should humans be doing but flying around the globe like there's no tomorrow. Oh wait, there is no tomorrow. Wait, what?


#7

Vancouver is a major North American West Coast port. it has hundreds upon hundreds of ships coming and going every day of every month of every year. It is virtually impossible to know ahead of time what any ship will be carrying, how safe the ships are and how professional the ships' crews are. That is a given that we must deal with. So if you are to transact international business, you take a certain amount of risk. the only thing that we can do is reduce that risk by insisting on stringent protections. One matter that can't be on the risk reduction schedule is forbidding the transport of natural energy resources. That is one of the major trade goods that makes Canada an energy exporter and helps manage foreign trade deficits. We must continue to transport energy resources offshore. We just have to do it safely! It is not impossible to arrange for such safety. Problems such as this spill will push the desire to protect our environment to the top of the list. It will be managed and managed well.


#8

Wow, who are your backers?
Vancouver is a major Canadian port. Amongst the many thousands of items arriving by ship in its harbour every day are oil and gas products. In fairly significant amounts. Spilling of these items into the ocean was statistically anticipated. And extremely poisonous.
British Columbians had a reasonable expectation, given the eventual likelihood of a spill occurring, that our governments and corporations would have a plan to clean up such spills quickly.
We've also been repeatedly told that protests against the expansion of shipping oil and gas on ships are unfounded because everything's just fine...move along folks, nothing to see here....we know how to clean up oil spills.

Are we that stupid?