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'Fighting for Incredible List of Educational Reforms,' Seattle Teachers Go on Historic Strike


#1

'Fighting for Incredible List of Educational Reforms,' Seattle Teachers Go on Historic Strike

Andrea Germanos, staff writer

For the first time in 30 years, Seattle teachers are hitting the picket lines on Wednesday after the teachers union and the school board failed to negotiate a tentative agreement.


#2

Watched the news last night. Big story about the teachers. Basically it was to the effect that the teachers were risking the kids education by delaying the start of school because of their greedy desire for higher wages. This was followed by little clips of parents pissed off due to the inconvenience the teachers were causing.
* Not one word about the list of improvements needed to provide an education rather than how to successfully pass an end-of-term multiple guess test that could lead to firing of teachers and closing of schools.
* Do not count on the evening news to give you anything but propaganda from the 0.001%.
;-})


#3

Thirty-five years ago our district went out on strike. To be honest, not all of the community was behind us at first, but by the time we settled, the public either forgot about "those greedy teachers" or else were converted to our cause. Some of the issues were about salary and benefits, but others impacted students directly--lower class size for one.

All of this is to say, you go, Seattle teachers. More power to you. When teachers started accepting bad contracts, those contracts only got worse. You are striking for all teachers in the United States, active and retired. I am proud of you.


#4

Many school districts and parents across the nation take heed: teachers HAVE HAD ENOUGH of the corporatization and undermining of PUBLIC EDUCATION. Teaching to the test and then tying test results to teacher performance/productivity is insane. Students suffer, teachers suffer, and parents suffer when their kids fall behind because long term learning/memory is adversely affected by cramming for tests along with test anxiety. Test anxiety alone interferes with learning and with the ability to recall in order to find answers. Testing (and getting test results) cost(s) million$$$ that is money that could be put to much better use providing classroom materials, playground equipment, school maintenance, etc. But the money machine (behind the scenes) mandating testing will continue to bring pressure to bear on PUBLIC EDUCATION and TEACHERS.

Bravo, SEATTLE TEACHERS! March on!


#5

Gave 'em a "thumbs up" from my bicycle on my way to work this morning.


#6

I'll just put this link right here. Freddie Deboer's great article about "University, Inc" ... Our colleges are in trouble too. This is about treating everything in this rapaciously capitalist country as a business. "Colleges today often
employ more senior administrators than professors." http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/13/magazine/why-we-should-fear-university-inc.html


#8

Are kids trained to be leaders or are they trained to be serfs?

As long as you have standardized high stakes games for little kids there will be 100 ways to game those games. The kids, not being stupid, will be able to play the game for profit. But should they? For that matter, the teachers and principals will always want to game the system.

I can guarantee you that the system will always be stupid enough to game because the system will always be Scrooge-cheap. If you double the amount of money that you pay the gaming company, the company will say, "hey, look at all this free money they dumped on us! Can we game the legislature to pour even more money on us?"

Therefore, train kids to lead and to be citizens. Train them to audit their governments and to publish.


#9

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#11

Hopefully this is a national precedent setter.

Scott the union breaker Walker, eat your rotten little heart out.

And go teachers!


#13

So because the Union endorses her, you can't vote for Bernie?


#14

Gotta Love Seattle Teachers.

Those that were not Loggers in my family became Teachers. (The Way Out)
Hopefully some of you were taught by my dad.He Taught Teachers to be Teachers.
I was stuffing and addressing Head Start mailers when I was in the 4th grade.

Why we single out and brutalize the BEST of our Community is quite clear.
It also links directly to the Charter School and Voucher Program fiascoes.

Dad's favorite lesson was regarding the argument between Jefferson and Hamilton regarding
the Rule of a Democracy.

Hamilton's position tended towards a ruling ability that was to be found mostly in the elite class
and that giving rule to the uneducated commoners would prove deleterious.

Jefferson's position was that rule was to be from the people,
furthermore, it was the "Duty of a Democracy to Educate",
thus ensuring the Ship of State steered nearer the course of the Common Man
who was Fully Capable of Leadership.

This is why the first taxes of a Young Republic were to FUND EDUCATION

Anything a Charter School can do, a Public School can do Better.
Why because it's goal is the Education of All, not just those able to pay.

And vouchers are simply a method to divert those Public Funds to private ventures.
And there are plenty of people willing to spend our taxes on their agenda.

So Support those Damned Fine Workers who haven't seen a COLA in 6 Years.
Those who Know, are Proud to Walk beside You, their TEACHER.

My Respects


#15

Great summary and "Go Seattle teachers" #Teachersnewscapegoat" for all that is wrong in America. You know the 1% wants to break the unions and start charter schools so that can be another source of income for them. Greed at work again.


#16

Hopefully teacher are independent thinkers and don't listen to the head of the AFT and NEA. I believe the AFT head received lots of flack from the members.


#17

Thanks for that great show of support.


#20

Classroom materials, playground equipment, school maintenance --yes, all these are important, but not even the bare minimum of what's needed for the quality education our children deserve. Classes in music and the graphic arts, in theater and dance; smaller class sizes for more individualized learning; field trips that take advantage of the cultural richness in our cities; poets in the classroom. Plenty of hands-on science from kindergarten onwards. These are but a few of the earmarks of a stellar education, made available to the children of the wealthy in this country; they could be, and should be, part of the educational experience of every child in this country. It isn't that the funds can't be found to transform public education in this country; it's all about the allocation of funds. How can we not want to provide the sort of classroom environments and experiences, a high caliber of teaching, an immersion in an enriched and inspiriting educational mileu that could challenge and delight our children and contribute vastly more to their growth? How can we ask them to continue in the spiritual wasteland of corporatized educational models that have precious little to do with creative and productive lives they deserve to look forward to as adults? We are asking children to mark time in our classrooms; we should be making it possible for them to thrive there.


#21

Can they revoke their endorsement?


#23

At the university where I work, there are hundreds of foreign students who were assured they could get jobs if they came here, to support themselves. Lies. There are no jobs but there are plenty of high interest bank loans which, now they are thousands of miles from home, have become their only option. I am ashamed of my institution.


#24

I finished high school in Arkansas in the late 80s and during my senior year the teachers in my school went on strike for about 2 weeks. At the time, the teachers were being paid less than the poverty level - in Arkansas. How about we pay our police officers that low? Or our firemen, soldiers, secret service agents? Just think of the tax dollars savings if our "men in uniform" were paid less than the poverty level. Although, low ranking soldiers are. So, the high ranking ones should too? For-profit charter schools aren't the answer any more than a for-profit army would be. Fire depts used to be for-profit entities but that didn't work. I agree with Thomas Jefferson that providing public education is a duty of the government- thank you rolson for pointing that one out.


#25

Agreed on all your points...wanted to keep the comment short and to the point. Thanks for lengthening the list of NEEDS. On another note, why is putting out a football team more important than providing more classes that foster creativity (music, art, theater, e.g.)? (A rhetorical question) When budgets take hits, you don't see too many schools dropping football...parents would probably be up in arms. Would venture to guess that when all is said and done that the school spends more on fb than it gains (field maintenance, new equipment, transportation, supplies, liability insurance, etc.). Seattle Prep and University Prep (private) do not have FB teams and these schools have more than enough disposable income based on their tuition rates. Guess for some schools, football is a way to get boys into college (2 or 4 year) who may not otherwise have access. Just my opinion.


#26

"We've gone six years with no state COLA and five years with no state increase in funding for educator health care."

Yeah, I would be pissed too. Apparently a substitute teacher is getting $30k.yr. I burger flipper at $15/hr working 30hr per week nets about $24k/yr.