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Fighting Poverty, Plagued by Violence: Why 10,000 Black Women in Brazil Marched for Their Rights


#1

Fighting Poverty, Plagued by Violence: Why 10,000 Black Women in Brazil Marched for Their Rights

Kiratiana Freelon

hey were lawyers, feminists, Christians, transgender women, domestic workers, militants, favela dwellers, politicians, students and many more. Despite their differences in beliefs, education and income, on Wednesday they came together behind the one thing they had in common: being a black woman in Brazil. On that day, more than 10,000 black women from all over the country gathered in Brazil’s capital city, Brasilia, for the first national black women’s march—Marcha das Mulheres Negras.


#2

Racism in Brazil includes a policy during the dictatorship that all indigenous peoples were to be 'assimilated into the national communion'. The indigenous peoples, ecumenical, civil, ecological , education - any human concern you can think of ... all are waking up to the necessity of working together for "Bem Viver"/ Living Well in Harmony, which has become a rallying cry throughout Central and South America.

Receiving virtually no coverage, the First Indigenous World Games were held last month in Brazil. Very interesting article here. Agribusiness interests now a powerful majority are pushing to amend the Constitution of 1988 to take control of indigenous land determinations. All lands have been frozen - a classic veiling operation a la Brazilian elite.

The Real World Indigenous Games in Brazil
Brazil approves major anti-indigenous legislation while the media keeps us entertained

“The Indigenous genocide of America is the biggest genocide in the
world, and we must join forces and fight for the end of this violence.”
Daiara Tukano


#3

Solidarity with these women and their families from another bastion of violence and racism--the USA.