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Following "First Step" Bill's Passage, Progressives Warn Greater Reforms Needed to Truly 'Right the Wrongs' of Mass Incarceration


#1

Following "First Step" Bill's Passage, Progressives Warn Greater Reforms Needed to Truly 'Right the Wrongs' of Mass Incarceration

Julia Conley, staff writer

The criminal justice reform bill which passed in the Senate Tuesday and is expected to be signed into law in the coming days has been recognized by progressives and prison reform advocates as one of Congress's most far-reaching efforts to fix the federal justice system that currently holds 225,000 Americans in its clutches in decades. But many noted Wednesday that the system's problems are far too vast to be fixed by one piece of legislation reached through bipartisan compromise.


#2

The First Step by Congress was to reward well-resourced white collar criminals and wealthy folks, in general. Sounds like Congress people have Springsteen’s " we take care of our own " sentiments, here. How generous of them. Let’s hope the clowns that approved of Sessions as AG are retired in the next election cycle.
Wherever you look the Kochs have their hands on the levers of justice; which is scary as hell to many, or should be, unless you’ve got the $$$.
Jared Kushner should/would be in prison and not making policy about the criminal justice system, if there was any real justice in America.
" White collar conservatives flashing down the street
Waving their plastic figures at me, ha! "
Screw them and the horse they road in on.


#3

Always look askance at anything that has “overwhelming bipartisan support”.

“Working across the aisle” is often just working over someone in the alley.


#4

For-profit prisons are evil. What makes them even worse than for-profit health care, which also must go away, is that occupancy rates at the former are entirely under the control of the “criminal justice” system. Some contracts specify that the rate must be at or above a certain level or the jurisdiction’s taxpayers must pay a penalty to the contractor—an obvious incentive to make more arrests and convictions, rather than fewer.

Some may remember the judges in Pennsylvania who were receiving kickbacks from a for-profit prison chain for keeping a juvenile detention facility fully stocked with young “fish.” Sick and sad.


#5

Maybe States should just pay those for profit prisons a flat monthly rental regardless of occupancy and let it go.at that.