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Framing Suspects in Alabama: All Those Things Black Lives Matter Says About Racism and Justice Are True


#1

Framing Suspects in Alabama: All Those Things Black Lives Matter Says About Racism and Justice Are True

In a stunning if alas unsurprising indictment of American "justice" - one suggested alternate headline: "Water Is Wet" - a new report found that racist cops in Dothan, Ala. and a complicit D.A. have been planting drugs and guns for years on black suspects, hundreds of whom remain jailed on false charges. Silver Lining Dept: The reveal came from whistle-blowing fellow-cops who "hope the mood of the country is one that demands action," and long overdue justice.


#2

Wow, and just fucking WOW. This is going to rock that town, and should rock this country.

The photographed letter is from 2004. And the US attorney's office did, exactly, what? Whatever investigation ensues, needs to look up that chain as well.

The brave officers who are now going public, are quite literally putting their lives, their families, and their existence in their communities at risk. They should be given whatever resources they need to protect themselves, and to reestablish their families elsewhere if necessary.

As to the rest of Dothan AL, it is to be prayed that enough resources and attention will be brought to bear on behalf of those victimized and imprisoned by the racist conspirators, so that a swift reassessment and vacation of their cases can be processed, and they can try to regain their lives. And the young people in the white families will have the opportunity to recognize and reject the deep racist ugliness that has been woven into their community for generations.


#3

Given the history of racism in the Southern part of the United States, and the United States, generally, this whole thing should come as absolutely no surprise...to anybody! Kudos to the brave officers who have gone public and taken risks to themselves, their families and their lives in order to do the right thing, if one gets the drift.

I wish these brave officers and their families the best of luck, and hope that they'll receive proper protection.


#4

And, this should lead to inquiries into the police, prosecutors and judiciaries in numerous jurisdictions, with general statistical analyses of arrest and imprisonment rates, a secure whistle-blower process for officers willing to come forward, and hard investigations into persons and procedures where anomalies are found. Which will be found in numerous jurisdictions.

EDIT:

And the Brennan Center, featured in another article today on Common Dreams, just published a statistical analysis of the sentencing behavior of judges who are facing reelection campaigns, versus that of judges who are not facing reelection campaigns. They found that judges up for reelection clearly tend toward harsher sentencing, presumably because they think they are playing to the electorate, or at least to a committed and vocal slice of the electorate, to avert being smeared as "soft on crime" in their upcoming campaign.

Perhaps someone at The Brennan Center could look into the feasibility of some kind of statistical anlaysis that could provide clear indicators in other jurisdictions of the sort of nasty conspiracy that took root in Dothan, AL.


#5

From the Henry County Report

"The group of officers requested they be granted anonymity, and shared hundreds of files from the Internal Affairs Division. They reveal a pattern of criminal behavior from within the highest levels of the Dothan Police."

"On August 27, 1999 more than a dozen officers had allegations against them"

"The notification of charges reference a combination of marijuana, cocaine, and guns being planted on citizens during arrests that were witnessed by multiple fellow police officers"

"They were then tested by polygraph examination, most reportedly failed. "

"The results of a polygraph tests given to officers like Michael Magrino were conclusive. The result was DECEPTION STRONGLY INDICATED – probability of deception was greater than 99%"

"Internal Affairs Sergeant, Keith Gray, recommended that Magrino be immediately discharged and prosecuted, all of his previous cases reopened for investigation, and the judges and attorneys of those convicted be immediately notified. Gray believed there were hundreds of false arrests in the system by the group of officers, historically over a thousand."

"All of these cases involving planted drugs and weapons were subsequently prosecuted by District Attorney, Doug Valeska, despite the written allegations by police officers that the evidence was planted."

" three names worth noting appear repeatedly.Capt. Carlton “Bubba” Ott, now commander of the department’s Criminal Investigation Division, Steve Parrish, current Chief, and Andy Hughes, former Sheriff and current Director of Homeland Security for the state."

"Disturbingly, Ott and Parrish have both attended the FBI academy. "

Guess where this should lead?


#6

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#7

And that the 1000+ victims of the police frame-ups receive their freedom , abject apologies from those responsible for the cover-up and generous financial compensation for the time lost behind bars . Unfortunately , any settlements will be paid by the taxpayers of that jurisdiction , not by the crooked cops themselves nor will it be taken from the police department budget . The law needs to be amended so that the police themselves suffer some of the financial fallout from their criminal behaviour .


#8

It's fucking crazy that y'all elect judges.


#9

They're appointed first, then in elections, some period of years later, they are retained or ousted by vote. Only in the last decades have these elections become politicized, and i'ts really ramped up lately.


#10

Hm that's interesting. That model actually sort of makes sense. Fascinating how corporatism perverts things.


#11

Yes it is. Also it is somewhat variable, some judges are elected, some are appointed, depends on the level of the court and the jurisdiction.


#12

There are some good people in Alabama.

But it's a creepy, depressing state of anti-union, simple-minded rednecks. Law Enforcement dishonesty goes way back in Alabama. Go rent the movie: "My Cousin Vinny" to see what I mean. It's hysterical!

You won't be sorry!

TJ
"You're in Ala-Fucking-Bama. You're from New York and you just killed a Good-oL-Boy; There ain't no way this case isn't going to trial." - Al Pesci

Click here to see the very relevant trailer:
Framed in Alabama


#13

As a northern boy my first flavor of 'south of the mason dixon' was mobile, alabama.
It is a very different reality that is self perpetuating in many ways.
One either likes that way of life or one leaves, I didn't see a middle ground.


#14

All African Americans have to fight for there lives everyday. African Americans are being murdered just for being black that is not OK and that is where this furry originated. You are either part the problem or part of the solutions. If you don't see the injustices being perpetrated on innocent african Americans you are part of the problem.
There is deeply entrenched generational racism, sexism, intolerance, hypocrisy and
bulling in police departments nationwide. The police unions and FOP have contracts that grant officers special privileges that protect officers from accountability and transparency. No one is forced to be a police officer but what job allows you to kill with no consequences. The police unions don't want to release the data regarding Officers suicides, domestic violence, alcohol and drug use especially steroid use. Taxpayers are stuck paying out massive amounts in damages from police misconduct along with continuing to pay officers salaries and benefits. Police unions are devoted to self preservation and will stop at nothing to continue there criminal enterprises. Violent extremist armed militias.


#15

As a pilot from the West Coast, I was horrified. From what I could determine, everyone was unhappy in the whole towns of Birmingham and Mobile, Shreveport, Jackson - Miss, Memphis, TN, etc, etc. You could see it in their eyes and attitudes. Extreme prejudice and hatred, left over from the Civil War festers in those places.

I'm interracial married with a California accent, and you might imagine how unacceptable even visiting those inbred, religious redneck communities was. It was just like the old movie "Guess who's coming to Dinner?", it was so unacceptable, we never went back unless kicking and screaming.

Everyone seemed to have a chip on their shoulder. The station people locked us out of the airport in the rain and wouldn't answer the phone. The tug driver wouldn't cooperate and kept calling us "Damn Yankees" abusing the equipment because he was pissed off with his job. The Tower controller wouldn't answer the radio. The airport wouldn't turn on any approach lights for a year at night... The airport authority wouldn't fix the precision instrument approach for a year at night, requiring us to do a dangerous non-precision approach in bad weather with no approach lights.

It was insane. Nothing could be fixed because the Good-Old-Boys Network wouldn't allow it. It was apparent, that if you weren't a millionaire running a slave plantation that you were going to be unhappy here. I spent my whole career desperately trying to avoid the South, but so did everyone else. So Union members who lived on the Left Coasts turned into commuters and lost all our days off going back and forth to the South, but it was worth it to get out of that hell-hole, even if just for one day.

Now, I feel that way about the whole US. The whole thing is devolving into a corrupt police state from hell. Better to just not have any police presence at all than a corrupt one that trumps up charges and defends right-wing vigilantes.

Glad I left.


#16

Thanks for the post, hope you'll consider posting on other articles here.