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Germany's Spy Targets Included FBI, UNICEF, US Weapons Makers


#1

Germany's Spy Targets Included FBI, UNICEF, US Weapons Makers

Andrea Germanos, staff writer

While Chancellor Angela Merkel claimed in 2013, "Spying among friends is never acceptable," a new media report alleges that the lengthening list of targets of Germany's intelligence agency included the FBI, the UN children's agency, and a German diplomat.


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#3

The USA & its weapons makers deserve to be spied on. I wish Merkel, Snowden, Assange & Manning would tell the world what they need to know about the Big, Bad Old USA.


#4

This kinda makes me smile, though, as an American--to know the NSA et al are getting some of their own medicine, that it's not all one way. You create a world where the powerful can spy in secret on anyone and everyone, then they all do. You create a world where Washington can send drones to illegally take out any real or imagined enemies, it's only a matter of time before every government, rebel army, or large religiopolitical faction has its own drones and eliminates its enemies. It's getting ugly fast, and it's disheartening how pathologically lacking in imagination modern people are, that they can't see this coming. Also how ethically challenged, of course.


#5

I'm not sure that's fair. Gehlen was a pure military-intell guy who specialised in the Soviets. I don't think there was ever a suggestion that he committed or commanded anyone who committed atrocities. In contrast, he was an early member of the July 20th plotters, and was lucky enough not only to escape being caught, but to be promoted before Hitler sacked him. That record seems to be somewhat anti-Nazi if anything.


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#9

From David Talbot's new book, "The Devil's Chessboard: Allen Dullles, the CIA, and the rise of America's Secret Government":

"Most of the intelligence gathered by Gehlen's men was extracted from the enormous population of Soviet prisoners of war--which eventually totaled four million--that fell under Nazi control. Gehlen's exalted reputation as an intelligence wizard, which won him the Fuhrer's admiration and his major general's rank, derived from his organization's widespread use of torture."


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#16

That's the first TWT article I've read that has crap in it.

For example:

. Six was SS, not Wehrmacht. He reported to Himmler, not Gehlen.

Although they tried to hang something on him at Nürnberg because he was SS, they failed to.

which must have been quite a while ago since he's been dead for 40 years. And he didn't go to work for Gehlen til the 1950s, if in fact he ever did. He was a W.-German (born in Mannheim), had no relatives in the Ost, and had no intelligence background -- so why would Gehlen have ever even given him a look-in? Because he once toured the USSR in an Einsatzgruppe truck? Not too likely.


#17

If his organisation committed atrocities, why couldn't they hang anything on him at Nürnberg? They certainly tried!


#18

Do a search on "Reinhard Gehlen - The National Security Archive". It's a declassified (in 2001) CIA doc provided at nsarchive.gwu.edu as a pdf. In it, you'll find that Gehlen was promoted Generalmajor in December '44 (the doc says brigadier, because that's the US equivalent), and then in '45 first reprimanded by Hitler and then, "in the last days of the war" ("Dismissed by Special Order of Hitler 9th April" is given in the timeline) , sacked. I'd cut and paste the text, but it's a scanned document. The information is in the first page, second text parargraph, about 3/4 down.


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#22

As he did with other Nazi war criminals who he thought could be of use to him, Dulles managed to help Gehlen avoid his fate at Nurnberg. Gehlen was flown out of Germany on a DC-3 military transport to the US, where he had comfortable quarters at Fort Hunt in Virginia. "Here he met Allen Dulles, who... decided that the US government should bring the former Nazi intelligence operation under its supervision."-- quoting again from The Devil's Chessboard, in which Talbot devotes an entire chapter to Dulles's relationship with Gehlen--see chapter 11, titled Strange Love.

The book is a fascinating read, and quite unsettling at the same time. It details events of the post-war years of US history which I, for one, was completely unaware. Dick Cheney is a piker compared to the evil demonstated by Allen Dulles during his tenure with the OSS, and later on as head of the CIA.