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Going After the Opioid Profiteers


#1

Going After the Opioid Profiteers

Sarah Anderson

Travis Bornstein never told his friends about his son Tyler’s drug problem. He was too embarrassed.

Then, on September 28, 2014, Tyler’s body was found in a vacant lot in Akron, Ohio. The 23-year-old had become addicted to opioid pain killers after several sports-related injuries and surgeries. Unable to afford long-term treatment, he ultimately turned to a cheaper drug — the heroin that killed him.


#2

I am sorry that happened. Where were his parents and other family members?


#3

Keep in mind that Afghanistan has become the number one opium grower during US military protection.

Also keep in mind that all those corporate pill making machines have electric meters and the number of pills made per watt hour is known exactly by the IRS. Depreciation and output are also figures filed with the IRS by pill makers. Legitimate sales revenue claimed by corporatists and filed with the IRS can then be compared to actual production. Any excess pills were sold illegally and the quantity can be computed in a very short time by IRS staff.


#4

Good to see a labor union leading this fight against capitalist abuse. Thanks to Ms.Anderson for this story.


#5

CIA [Cocaine In America], Contra War in Nicaragua. Ronnie Ray Gun's freedom fighters.
Not much of a stretch to opium is it.


#6

We need to stop & frisk these boys in coal country (wink).
Make an example out of them (wink, wink).


#7

"Since Tyler’s death, he’s learned that opioid addiction isn’t a moral failure," a sad story ...one of tens of thousands, but it is a moral failure, the C.E.O.'s and doctors that put this pill out by the millions failled miserablly in there duty , doctors have the hypocratic oath, that states "first do no harm" they failed this oath to the point of it being criminal, doctors knew very well what these drugs were doing but still dealt them out like street dealers themselves, and in many cases directlly to street dealers themselves, this is no secret, and they did this because the money was so easy, the golf junckets provided by the drug companys for pimping there products were just the right distraction from having to deal with so many of the pesky pill seekers.

Make no mistake, what these C.E.O.'s did was more than a moral hic up, this was a criminal enterprise to reap hundreds of millions of dollars, at the expense of the health and well being of millions of folks who trusted in there doctors and the chemical companys that make there medicines.

These same C.E.O.'s knew how addictive there products were and took measures to hide this from the public. even advertising it as being non addictive, preposterous,...anyone with half a brain could see how this stuff worked and what it was doing. And it would only take a week or two to observe this, it was so obvious.

I am very familliar with these products, and know first hand how dangerous and addictive they are, it should never have gotten on to the market in the first place, and there should be questions as to why/how it was approved, and how much cash changed hands there.

In addition to the teamsters taking action on this , there was a story recentlly about Everret Washington going after Purdue for damages related to what there product has done to devastate there communityhttp://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-oxycontin-lawsuit-20170118-story.html

These C.E.O.s' that reaped hundreds of millions of dollars and doctors that prescribed it are as guilty if not more so than the drug cartells for pushing there own brand of poison, they should be doing time.... lots of ,it for the deaths and destruction of lives they caused all in the name of proffit for themselves and shareholders, if thats not criminall, what is?


#8

Weird times. Afghanistan is the premium poppy producing zone. When the former Soviet Union was in control there, significant, effective programs were put in place, and almost all the poppies disappeared. However, under US control, the business is flowering, so to speak. So, US policy has been to plant and harvest. Everyone knows that opium is hard to manage because of the high profit, the money you selling the drug contrasted to what it costs to grow the drug. Portugal has demonstrated a very useful, probably the ONLY useful, drug control strategy. You remove all criminality for those caught in the drug trade. The government buys, distributes and controls the sale of the drug. (You buy opium in the "Drug Store"; where else? The price is very low.) People who want to grow poppies are free to do that. After a few years, the number of drug related arrests greatly decreased, with the huge costs of running the criminal business, all those police, lawyers, judges, guards, etc.pretty much went away. Violence disappeared. The data showed there were far fewer opium addicts. (Addition usually results from the "gift" of enough of the drugs to get one hooked, and there is no incentive now to do that.) Poppies are sort of pretty. In my yard, it is a problem to keep them in control. They grow thickly and choke out other plants. So maybe, the best idea would be to plant poppies along highways and in parks. That would free up the land in Afghanistan for other crops, say corn and wheat.


#9

The Drug War has always been about protecting Big Pharma, and neutralizing Populist Power.


#10

Write on OldDutch.

My doctor dad often said, "There is no such thing as a happy drug addict."

The drug addict's world changes when the drug is a medicare type prescription from a doctor who periodically offers face to face help. No pressure. The doctor is there for many people.

Drug addicts aren't happy with addiction even when their addiction is cheap enough they don't need to steal. A doctor should be there to help. Copy Portugal if that idea is better. Treat the epidemic.


#11

And it was alcohol to the ndns before that. Then the opium war in China. Why is Coke named Coke?


#12

Trump's plan to further reduce the US Coast Guard's budget while increasing the budgets of the other branches of the military will enable Trump and his cronies to increase the opiate supply after he and Ryan gut Medicaid, Medicare and other programs that pay for opioid addicts' drugs.

Once the opioid addicts are kicked off gubmit programs they will need a steady supply of street opiates. Trump will make sure the Coast Guard is not hindering that supply.


#13

The opioid class of drugs are basically synthetic versions of the old opiate drugs, derived from opium. I have been administered both by physicians, and much prefer the former. For me the opioids are very unpleasant.

I think these dangerous drugs should be treated like methaqualone, Quaaludes, were back in the 70's or 80's. I cannot remember whether by government force or by responsible corporate leadership, production of the drug was ended.

Responsible and moral corporate leadership is a rare commodity these days, and if it were present these opioids would be withdrawn from the market. The old fashioned opiate drugs work fine.