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Greece and the Death of Democracy, Economics and Civility


#1

Greece and the Death of Democracy, Economics and Civility

Louis-Philippe Rochon

Irrespective of whether it was total capitulation, there are already a multitude of analyses trying to decipher what (and how) exactly happened in Greece and whether it could have been avoided. Countless opinions will be offered as to who is to blame.


#2

It is fascinating for a social scientist to see how, once again, people fall prey to the same underlying paradigms they have been carrying for centuries. The Germans are behaving exactly as their ancestors always have. Eurpoean dynamics have always been of elitist contempt for anyone not mirroring their particular version of 'civilized" values, and perfectly willing to disdainfully crush anyone who does not conform (or allow their exploitation). Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed is suggested reading for all those who would throw off the yoke of capitalist oppression.


#3

A little German history - 1934 The New Plan
This plan "gave sharply preferential treatment to nations that were willing to sell to Germany and receive payment in German goods rather than hard currency. Countries had a guaranteed market in the depression but had to leave payment for their goods in Germany and use the payment only to buy German manufactured goods. These nations no longer had money to buy on the open market and became dependent on Germany. The system was focused on "the Danubian Region, including Greece and Turkey." This was an old idea and was one of Germany's war aims in World War I. - see Harry Cliadakis, "Fascism in Greece."


#4

Other nations need to learn from America's example. The US has been implementing the austerity agenda since the mid-1980s, doing it slowly, from the bottom up, while simultaneously demonizing the masses pushed into poverty. Economically, the US has been in some serious messes in the past. Each time, the masses -- poor and middle class, workers and the jobless -- ultimately united to push back, to everyone's benefit. That can't happen this time.

Something to consider: When Reagan was first elected, launching the campaign against our poor, the overall quality of life in the US was rated at #1. By the time Obama was elected, this had already plunged to #43, and the US can no longer adequately compete in the modern world market. In short, we're sunk -- no matter how vigorously we wave the banner of middle class elitism.


#5

Actually, that sounds a lot like today's America, and the middle class elitism that liberals have promoted since the Clinton administration.