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Have We Found a Cure for the Atrocities of War?


#1

Have We Found a Cure for the Atrocities of War?

Kristin Miller

The United States has a long history of noncooperation with international legal entities. For example, America is not a member of the International Criminal Court. Add to that the fact that President Trump has not been shy about his “America First” style of foreign relations.


#2

From the article:

“In the meantime, policy wonks and rights advocates fear that the mere discussion of closing the office sends the wrong message about US justice to the world.”

Seriously? U.S. “justice”? Such as the way we have held people like George Bush, Dick Cheney, our torturers, Barak Obama, etc, etc., etc., accountable?

Given our war crimes in countries all over the world, and our refusal to hold ourselves accountable for any of them, closing the office sends exactly the right message about U.S. justice.


#3

“Trump has not been shy about his ‘America First’ style of foreign relations.”

just had to stop reading a moment and copy this sentence from the intro paragraph. oh, i’m no fan of the donald, but this ongoing politically motivated pretense that trump’s “america first” rhetoric has destroyed the u.s. well-earned and deserved reputation as a humble and compassionate nation is just false advertising. remember reagan’s “shining light on the hill” self-defing america as the ideal for all other nation’s to emulate? or this quote from obama, “America remains the one indispensible nation, and the world needs a strong America, and it is stronger now than when I came into office.”?

US officials over the last 10 years “for what are undisputed war crimes,” according to former US Army Judge Advocate General Maj. Todd Pierce, have routinely been tossed out on the grounds that the accused were “acting within the scope of their employment.” Pierce compared that defense to “the latest version of the Nuremberg defense of ‘I was just following orders.’ Closing this office dispenses with any lingering hypocrisy that we care to hold war criminals accountable for their acts.”
thank you, todd pierce for admitting u.s. hypocrisy! however, let’s be brutally honest. the hypocrisy arrived not ten years ago but with those first european colonizers who set up housekeeping on an occupied continent and created a quasi-democracy with slavery embedded in the very cornerstone.

“In the meantime, policy wonks and rights advocates fear that the mere discussion of closing the office sends the wrong message about US justice to the world.”

indeed! we should never allow a carefully constructed image to be destroyed by the Truth!


#4

The cure for war is obviously direct democracy. Direct democratic Switzerland has had no wars since it established direct democracy almost 300 years ago. No leaders, no war.

Hermann Goering – The People Can Always Be Brought to the Bidding of the Leaders
“Why, of course, the people don’t want war. Why would some poor slob on a farm want to risk his life in a war when the best that he can get out of it is to come back to his farm in one piece. Naturally, the common people don’t want war; neither in Russia nor in England nor in America, nor for that matter in Germany. That is understood. But, after all, it is the leaders of the country who determine the policy and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a democracy or a fascist dictatorship or a Parliament or a Communist dictatorship…
Voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country.”
– Hermann Goering (as told to Gustav Gilbert during the Nuremberg trials)


#5

The cure for war is to jail the warmongers, Nuremberg-style. Sadly the U.S. “justice” system is just as bought off and complacent as the warmongers.


#6

Perhaps due to the US leading the way for war crimes closing the office is in the government’s best interest. After all which country has the balls to take on the US government for all the crimes done even in this century?


#7

Speaking of Nazi criminals read “The Devil’s Chessboard” by David Talbot and see how the CIA brought Nazi criminals into the intelligence community both here and abroad, truly frightening. No wonder it’s so hard to bring war criminals to justice. It seems the more powerful nations can do what they want or as Bush I said; “what we say goes” as delivered to the military in a speech before or during gulf war 1.


#8

Yes, the u.s. of hypocrisy leads the way for 500 years in imperialist slaughter for empire!
Yes, denial is a national condition in the empire for 500 years!


#9

The anatomy of “war” is in great detail spelled out in that great book: THE WRETCHED OF THE EARTH by the brilliant philosopher, doctor,psychiatrist, author, splendid young man (he died at age 36 of
leukemia), the eminent FRANTZ FANON who lived in Brazil. Try it some
time - it provides a healthy new kind of education, especially for us caucasians, I 'spect! What a guy was he!!! Love/struggle, Elizabeth H. Sarfaty, Malone, NY


#10

I am also reminded of another splendid soul - Rev. Wiiliam Sloane Coffin. who was, in all his later life work for peace-making for the Non-Violent Jesus, reminded us very often of that wonder-full quote of Camus -
WOULD THAT I COULD LOVE NY COUNTRY AND JUSTICE TOO.
I’m going to go read some of the fine activities of John Dear, Kathy Kelly,
Chris Hedges, and then some more of PEMA CHODRON, to help keep
my peace… try some of that, too!! Love/peace (as Lynne Stewart liked to remind us, huh?) Elizabeth