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Held 14 Years Without Charge, CIA Torture 'Guinea Pig' Abu Zubaydah Asks for Freedom


#1

Held 14 Years Without Charge, CIA Torture 'Guinea Pig' Abu Zubaydah Asks for Freedom

Lauren McCauley, staff writer

After 14 years of being held without charge, Guantánamo prisoner Abu Zubaydah, who was subject to brutal torture and is known as the "guinea pig" for the Central Intelligence Agency's (CIA) "enhanced interrogation program," made his first appearance on Tuesday before the Periodic Review Board and requested to be set free.


#2

As a Guinea Pig Zubaydah is exhibit A on on several grounds:

  1. That torture is counter productive. He had begun to cooperate with professional interrogators before the torturers stepped in, effectively shutting down any useful questioning.

  2. That torture is grossly cruel and inhumane. Among other things he was repeatedly waterboarded.

  3. That the treatment he received bars any judicial hearing on the merits of his incarceration. Whatever may remain of the allegations against him can not be fairly adjudicated. He should be freed.


#3

Sounds like they think he knows too much.


#4

Abu Zubaydah should be freed. He should trade places with Bush, Clinton & Obama.


#5

Incarceration without charges laid for 14 years is a crime against humanity.

Habeas corpus, established 800 years ago, The U.S. Constitution specifically includes the habeas procedure in the Suspension Clause (Clause 2), located in Article One, Section 9. Although Bush lost a challenge in court against detaining people at Guantanamo and denying them habeas corpus, keeping someone for 14 years without charge ignores this ruling.


#6

It also goes against the Universal Declaration of Human Rights to which the United States is a co-signer, specifically articles 9, 10, 11.


#7

Were it not for the torture he might reasonably have been tried long ago. He should be freed.


#8

Like what? He knows less now than when he became a prisoner. Everyone knows about the torture. So what are you talking about?


#9

This story doesn't have Trump, Clinton, or Stein in the headline, so minimal interest among CD readers.


#10

He can't be tried because he was tortured.
He's being held illegally.
But since when has illegal or legal have anything whatsoever to do with the way Obama operates?

Zubaydah is still in Gitmo because the US oligarchy wants him there and for no other reason.


#11

He was not tortured under Obama. But now the extrajudicial incarceration must be addressed. And only by his release.


#12

Despite what the unidentified government official says, Abu very most likely should have never been arrested in the first place. I remember the bounty Afghani citizens were paid for turning in the bad guys by the Bush/Cheney regime. What happened? Everybody and their brother was getting turned in for being the bad guys. Then, hundreds of these so called bad guys, to include Abu, were sent off to torture chambers across the globe. Bagram Air Base, then Gitmo. Release them all. This will go down as one of the most evil sick chapters in the history of the human race.


#14

\4. Torture is illegal and torturers should be investigated and prosecuted. There should be a new Nuremburg for the US going back to 2000 with full exposure in trials for everything that went down.

Any thoughts on why Obomber hasn't freed him already or closed Guantanomo or started #4 for that matter?


#15

Zubaydah was not like the poor taxi driver who died in the course of torture in Afghanistan. He had some connection to Al Gaeda. But that can no longer be an issue. He needs to be released.


#16

Yeah, that'll happen. After we exhume Truman to stand trial for Hiroshima and Nagasaki. And those guys who wiped out the Pequods too. History must adjudicate. Or as someone once suggested, in a way, let that government without atrocity cast the first indictment.


#17

Aside from the general absurdity of your comment: When did Obama become Dubyas brother? Anymore than you are?


#18

If only any government without atrocity were to cast the first indictment, no-one, but no-one could indict anyone for criminality.And the Nazi junta of 1933-45 and their offspring, would still be running Germany. Don't forget to exhume Roosevelt for fire-bombing around 38 Japanese cities in which more people died than at Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

W e can only stumble on with the governments we have got, trying to do better next time, unlike Obama who never bothered to take his feet off the table in the Oval Room.


#19

Even if he really had been a high-ranking member and was in on plans, arrangements, methods, etcetera, by now he would be so out of touch and out of date to be useless for any kind of information.

Actually, what they should have done with all of them, instead of torture, put them up in luxury-hotels, made sure that they had access to the internet and other communications and just listened in as well as talking to them in mutual respect. The latter worked for WWII interrogators far better than other methods. And if you give them opportunities to get in touch with their families and friends you will have a far better chance of getting information from their exchanges. A prison, however, stops all that and the harder you work to get information the less you get and the less the quality.


#20

How the F did he lose an eye? I am sickened, saddened and shamed that any of these activities were done in service of the US. Full restoration and compensation should be made immediately. Unfortunately, given that he was tried and convicted in absentia in Israel I don't believe it will ever come to pass.


#21

Just now discovering this article. I wasn't being a liar, I was just being an idiot, as I had taken a quick look but overlooked what you were talking about.

Agree with your post on this, and yes you are correct, my comment regarding the NPR ombudsman is fitting with this article.