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'Historic First': Nebraska Farmers Return Land to Ponca Tribe in Effort to Block Keystone XL


#1

'Historic First': Nebraska Farmers Return Land to Ponca Tribe in Effort to Block Keystone XL

Jessica Corbett, staff writer

In a move that could challenge the proposed path of TransCanada's Keystone XL pipeline—and acknowledges the U.S. government's long history of abusing Native Americans and forcing them off their lands—a Nebraska farm couple has returned a portion of ancestral land to the Ponca Tribe.

"Repatriating this land to the Ponca Tribe raises new challenges for the Keystone XL pipeline and respects the leadership of Native nations in the fight against the fossil fuel industry."
—May Boeve, 350.org


#2

Water is life.

This is inspiring, and, I hope, contagious.


#3

Kudos to Art and Helen Tanderup. This is also another innovative strategy on the part of the native communities working with 350.org and the family farmers trying to fight the KXL. The Tanderup’s have been fighting the eminent domain proceedings that would have their 160 acre farm taken away from them - back in 2014 this couple were named “farm heroes” by Farm Aid and they have continued to stand firm in their battle.


#4

Mni Wiconi! Jah be Jahmin’!


#5

I wish there were more I could do, but NRDC has a petition alert to stop the Keystone XL

Body of letter that can be personalized:

Dear Sec. Pompeo and the State Department:

I’m writing to express my opposition to the proposed Keystone XL pipeline.

This pipeline would transport 830,000 barrels a day of dirty tar sands oil from Canada’s boreal forest through America’s heartland.

I urge you to not just analyze the pipeline’s new proposed route in Nebraska, but to carefully consider how it threatens our land, wildlife, drinking water, and the nation’s clean energy future, as well as the risks the pipeline poses to farmers, ranchers, indigenous people, and other communities along its route.

Your approval of Keystone XL was based on a stale environmental review from 2014 and violated our nation’s bedrock environmental laws.

But even though you plan on conducting a new environmental assessment, the facts are still the same: The permit is still illegal, and the pipeline still threatens our environment and our health.

I demand that the State Department, the Bureau of Land Management, and all other federal agencies deny any future permits for this project, and revoke the existing cross-border permit, immediately.

Thank you for your time.


#6

Those pushing the treasonable pipeline need to face justice…


#7

I applaud the Tanderups, but I don’t think 1.6 ac. is gonna do it. An acre is 208 x 208 ft. pretty easy for the pipeline to go around. I hope I’m missing something.


#8

Good point, ReconFire. Also, maybe, I’M missing something: Did the farmer GIVE BACK or SELL that acre? A gift would be music to my ears; SALE, not so much. And if it WAS a sale–how much $$$$?


#9

It was a gift of the land that the Tanderups have let the Ponca people use for the last five years to plant sacred corn (Google this family and you’ll see the many good things they have done over the last ten years against the KXL and in support of the native communities around them). This particular plot was also going to be bought by eminent domain against their wishes and also happened to sit on the Ponca “trail of tears”.


#10

Thank you, dpearl for the information. Good on those people.


#11

This is excellent. And, probably the only way right now we can get and increse momentum-smaller acts (this of course large in here and now) but we need to see more, piece by piece, of terrritory repatriated. It’s not going to happen in any one fell swoop, But this type of act can snowball andl lead to larger things.
One of the biggest issues is the feds AND the bulk of American citizens simply need to know that there is a growing mass of us who are fed up. Crap like Bears’ Ears can only get rammed though permanently if the weasels perceive no one will back up the native tribes. We are a pretty “yin” force-big and powerful without their white bwana yang oppression. In the long run, we can win.
The entire symbolism, with small native women being hit with water cannons at Standing Rock says it all. And Ameiricans need to see the archetype to let it sink in and feel the shame.