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House Intel Report Is 'Accidentally Exonerating,' Says Snowden


#1

House Intel Report Is 'Accidentally Exonerating,' Says Snowden

Nika Knight, staff writer

The House Intelligence Committee on Thursday released a heavily redacted, declassified version of its report on National Security Agency (NSA) whistleblower Edward Snowden, and Snowden charges that the "parade of falsity" contained in the report is "accidentally exonerating."


#2

President Obama,PLEASE pardon Edward Snowden (and Chelsea Manning as well). Not that either one ought to need pardoning. They both deserve our gratitude, admiration, and respect for their sacrifices made in an attempt to enlighten and educate the American people. Pardon, apology, and then compensation for all they've had to endure!


#3

1) Alan Grayson stated something I guess has been clear all along - No one is put on the intelligence committees who won't go along with the conclusions they are told to reach.

2) For all that I agree Snowden should be exonerated, my understanding is no one can be pardoned unless they've been convicted which, to my knowledge, hasn't happened. Anyone?


#4

One of the herds of hephalumps in the rum is the song and dance of the generating of the reports - and the on-record lies under oath causing a bad national case of the clap, I mean clapper. The conversation might go something like this....
OK, dispense with statements in hearings, we'll get the combers (committee members) big fat black magic (gotta love it) markers...". Otherwise known as the 'mad-libs' version of a 'counterability because no matter what the public response is, it can be countered.
The obscene license granted for high crimes and mischief taken by the revolving "lobby" coup-in-slow-motion- to-trip-everything-up is and has been so that you think the coup is still in the future and yet to come rather than stalking you from behind.


#5

Didn't President Ford pardon Nixon for any crimes he "may have" committed while president? With no charges or conviction, if I remember correctly.


#6

Indeed he did .. and at the time it baffled me for the same reason ..
But what do I know?


#7

The evidence: On a final trip to Europe, Obama, in an interview with the German news weekly Der Spiegel, asked whether he would consider pardoning NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, replied, “I can’t pardon somebody who hasn’t gone before a court and presented themselves, so that’s not something that I would comment on at this point.”

This facile answer is simply wrong. The founders deliberately gave presidents unlimited pardon powers, exempting only the right to pardon him or herself in the case of an impeachment — a logical exclusion. Otherwise there are no constraints on and no power to undo a presidential pardon. Nor does a pardon have to follow a person’s being convicted or even indicted.

President Gerald Ford’s pardon of his resigned predecessor Richard Nixon is a case in point. As Obama, the “Constitutional law” expert, surely knows, Nixon, though impeached in the House, was never tried by the Senate. He resigned rather than face that trial, which his advisors convinced him he would lose. President Bill Clinton also issued a pre-prosecution pardon to financier Marc Rich, who had fled the country rather than face federal racketeering charges.

In other words, President Obama could easily pardon Edward Snowden if he wanted to. Instead, he fell back on a convenient fiction, perhaps hoping that the German reporter and his editors would be ignorant enough about the US Constitution and about US history that his lie would slip by them.


#8

Thanks!


#9

GHWBush pardoned Casper Weinberger before he stood trial, as I recall, for his involvement in the Iran-Contra scandal. Do a quick search.


#10

Persecution makes whistleblowers escape to safe places, often to the antagonists. Whether or not the person cooperates with its guest country is not the point. It is the stupidity of forcing them into that position.


#11

Yes, here is Ford's pardon, the important part:

"Now, Therefore, I, Gerald R. Ford, President of the United States, pursuant to the pardon power conferred upon me by Article II, Section 2, of the Constitution, have granted and by these presents do grant a full, free, and absolute pardon unto Richard Nixon for all offenses against the United States which he, Richard Nixon, has committed or may have committed or taken part in during the period from January 20, 1969 through August 9, 1974.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and seventy-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and ninety-ninth.

GERALD R. FORD"


#12

No. That is not true. Bush I pardoned Casper Weinberger and several others involved in Iran-Contra for any charges that might be made against them. It also saved Bush himself from potential charges.


#13

Snowden needs to be making plans for going underground. His days as a semi-free man are numbered after January 20 when his usefulness to the Putin government ends.


#14

Try November 22nd 1963.
;-})


#15

The shattering crash and sound of ripping and burning following Ford's speech was simply the destruction of the Constitution of the United States of America. It tended to stand in the way of Fascism and Nazism, which seems to have been and is, the current plan.
;-})


#16

Unfortunately, if Snowden does accept a pardon and returns to the US Fourth Reich, he will undoubtedly be tragically killed by a "lone crazed assassin" funded, probably, by the CIA. Or, perhaps, he may be run over by a bus or fall into the path of an oncoming subway train.
* No, Richard, probably best to stay with a friendly country or go deep underground. Remember Assange.
;-})


#17

Or to be more exact, Snowden's usefulness as pawn ends and his usefulness as a gift to Putin's good friend and fellow plutocrat Trump begins


#18

Russia will cease to be a "friendly country" after January 20. Surely you can see that.


#19

"It's not illegal if the President does it." President Richard M. Nixon

I guess it must come down to that since I agree with you that traditionally one has to be convicted of something in order to be pardoned for it.


#20

Can't fix the water in Flint?

It's because the Military/Intelligence Money Sponge absorbs a Gluttonous Amount of our Tax Dollars and wastes it on Wild Goose Chases like this, persecuting an Actual Patriot for performing a Public Service.