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How to Be a Good Digital Citizen During the Election—And Its Aftermath

Originally published at http://www.commondreams.org/views/2020/11/01/how-be-good-digital-citizen-during-election-and-its-aftermath

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Thank you for this article, as it will be very helpful to so many. Although I do wonder about people who seem to use facebook for their news. source.

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I’m worried. I think that I may be unconsciously perpetrating thoughtcrime and disseminating mis-information detrimental to our open and fair election system here in the homeland.

If the author could please direct me to the ministry of truth website I should like to re-align myself with the unadulterated state-sponsered truth.

Our great country has been overturning democracies and disrupting elections around the world for the better part of 100 years - they’ve gotten pretty darn good at it. Maybe… just maybe, the focus of these patriotic good men in black coats has been turned inward towards the great homeland??

Just look at what you’ve written. This situation you’re describing is both absurd and dystopian. It’s more descriptive of a 3rd world or totalitarian culture than a functioning democracy - every voter should become a “full-time” sleuth to double and triple check every bit of information before ultimately self-censoring in deference to the officially accepted party line. You’re description reads like a list of side-effects from some pharmaceutical company offering:

"In particular, you may end up seeing misleading information shared about voting in person, mail-in ballots, the day-of voting experience, and the results of the election. You may see stories online circulating about coronavirus outbreaks or infections at polling locations, violence or threats of intimidation at polling locations, misinformation about when, where and how to vote, and stories of voting suppression through long lines at polling stations, and people being turned away.

We likely won’t know the results on Election Day, and this delay is both [anticipated and legitimate] There may be misinformation about the winner of the presidential election and the final counting of ballots, especially with the increase in mail-in ballots in response to the coronavirus pandemic. It will be important to know that not every state finalizes their official ballot count on November 3, and there may be narratives that threaten the legitimacy of the election results, like people claiming their vote did not get counted or saying they found discarded completed ballots.

What if the source of misinformation is … you?

There is a lot you can do to help reduce the spread of election misinformation online. This can happen both accidentally and intentionally, and there are both foreign and domestic actors who create disinformation campaigns. But ultimately, you have the power to not share content."

I sincerely mean no disrespect. I’m still trying to unpack this article, but it sure as heck reads like some weird kind of psy-ops to me. But then, I could be a russian spy and not even know it - or perhaps I’m just an thoughtless persuadable rube. Again, if you could please direct me to the ministry of truth website it will be most appreciated.

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