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Hundreds of Thousands in Streets as General Strike Engulfs Catalonia After Violent Crackdown


#1

Hundreds of Thousands in Streets as General Strike Engulfs Catalonia After Violent Crackdown

Jessica Corbett, staff writer

People took to the streets in Barcelona and across the Catalan region to condemn a militant crackdown by Spain's police forces during last weekend's referendum for independence


#2

This is what needs to happen in the USA. Shut the odious machine down.


#3

Yes! General strikes are a necessary aspect of non-violent revolution. The U.S. has never had a full-on national strike, though there have been a number of local ones and I think railroad workers struck nationally at least once. But we must also remember that this is not a one-off spontaneous event, but follows decades of organizing and struggle in a nation that was formally fascist until Franco died in 1975.


#4

Three days of this against trump and the rest of the republicans and you’d have yourselves a new government. It’s really that basic.


#5

Stand Tall this is Your Time

Godspeed


#6

let’s remember that for many years, Spain was ruled by fascist Franco - sounds like the current “socialist” has not unlearned his predecessor’s tactics. ugly. Go Catalonians - Barcelona is the best of the best of Spain. May you find your freedom.


#7

One reason for the Railway Labor Act that restricts the rights of union railway workers to negotiate and strike. This was extended to unionized airline employees as well.


#8

It’s cute that you think that Trump is a Republican.

Perhaps you didn’t notice that he ran against the Republicans as well as the Utterly Corrupt Clinton Political Machine®.
Everyone from the Bush’s, the Koch brothers and the neo-con rags such as The Weekly Standard and the National Review opposed Trump.

That’s why he was elected. Total disgust with both parties. I live in MN and he only lost to Hillary by 1 1/2 points.


#9

Wishful thinking.

Millions of us marched against the invasion of Iraq, to no avail.

The Bush administration dismissed us as a “mob,” and the majority of Democrats voted with Bush.


#10

I’d love to know the backstory on how the push leading up to this independence vote. What were the strategies of the proponents?


#11

I wouldn’t be a bit surprised to find that the issue isn’t Catalonian independence but with the rest of the nation joining in.


#12

It could have been the administration acting like it couldn’t do its job. Oh wait, maybe I have things muddled a bit.


#13

Why do you want them to split off from Spain?
I’m a Southerner, so I’m generally in favor of secession as a concept, but I know nothing about the politics of the region.
I’m interested in hearing more about this issue.
Yes, Franco was an actual Fascist, but that was a long time ago. What is it about the current regime that has these folks so pissed? I’m sure there’s some solid reasons or there wouldn’t be this vote and passion, but don’t know really anything about the area.


#14

A march is not the same as a general strike.

The American left should take note. This is how you get things done.


#15

“15,000 people”?? O, pleeeeease! Where on Earth did you get THAT estimate?


#16

My thoughts exactly.


#17

Unfortunately the “formerly” part isn’t exactly true. A good part of the reason for the present problems is that the conservatives in Madrid were/are carrying on the Franco tradition. Granted it wasn’t nearly as bad as under Franco, but the same colors tinted everything the central government did.


#18

Yup. I should have been more clear on that. The “conservatives” are direct descendants of Franco’s Falangists and I think the Falange still exists as a formal party on some levels. Thanks for this important correction/addition.


#19

Your reply makes no sense. Trump is the standard bearer of your party. Like it or not (and what’s to like?), you own him. Trump is indeed today’s republican, and so are you. You can’t have it both ways.