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'I Can't Afford That': Trapped and Injured in a Subway Station, Woman Begged Bystanders Not to Call Ambulance Due to Expense


#1

'I Can't Afford That': Trapped and Injured in a Subway Station, Woman Begged Bystanders Not to Call Ambulance Due to Expense

Julia Conley, staff writer

As Americans across the country celebrate Independence Day with parades, barbecues, and fireworks displays, the story of a woman begging bystanders not to call an ambulance after she was injured in an accident went viral this week—with universal healthcare advocates pointing to the incident as clear evidence that a Medicare for All system would bring gravely-needed relief to all Americans.


#2

Not many people these days can afford the cost of an Ambulence, the hospital tests, doctors fees and more. This will become worse. Medicare for all is not the same as Single Payer. I’m assuming a young wtiter is saying this and has no idea how corrupt and costly Medicare is. This is not the same Medicare my parents had. It will bankrupt you if you have to see a Specialist or go to the Hospital. Medicare sucks. Single payer is the only way. However, with this Admin, forget about either one ever coming into play. They want us to have… Nothing!


#3

I was hit by a car while bicycling (hit and run), crawled into a park area near the road, and spent three hours in agony hoping I could recover enough to drag myself home instead of going to a hospital. I failed.
I had a totally broken upper femur. The ambulance was $950 and the ambulance people were rough and mean.
They refused to take me to the good hospital I wanted to go to because they get bribes from a shitty hospital.
The surgeon was great but the hospital staff and conditions were atrocious.
They hooked me on dilaudid, morphine and Oxy and only because of medical cannabis could I kick those fatal drugs.
I owed thousands of dollars and am still paying.
If this injury had happened in Canada, Finland, Denmark, Norway, et al, I’d have had far better car, for virtually no fee.


#4

Was a traction splint applied to you’re leg ? If applied properly it should have given you much needed relief until the doctor was ready to splint it or prep for surgery. If not, you have one hell of a lawsuit, those splints have been the norm for years.


#5

The problem isn’t so much access but the actual cost of health care which no one but the very rich could afford. The women needed some protection about how much she could be charged. In my state there are provisions for that it is called Medicaid. Medicare for All isn’t going to solve that, instead it redistributes and flattens health care costs. It transfers those costs to patients and in states that can’t afford those costs proposed cap and trade. Either way, it doesn’t address many of the issues in the US that other countries face with single payer. It is just a redistribution. I’m for single payer when these issues are addressed. So far that hasn’t been determined in other words it is still just an idea.


#6

I’m very saddened by your story. I took my last oxy at 2am today w/o mmj to back me up. Oh my the world we live in.


#7

Most of us have medical war stories. I wont go into details, but clipped on a motorcycle with no medical ins.
Ambulance ride (no care provided) - $1500
ER visit (handed a sling for broken clavicle, total time there 30 min. and failed to diagnose multiple rib fractures, and referral to orthopedic surgeon) - $3400
Doctor bill in ER ( saw him 5min.) - $1200
Radiology in ER ( 3 chest x-rays) - $2200
Orthopedic surgeon would not see me with no medical ins., had to have my vehicle ins. carrier call them on my behave to get an appointment for care and pay out of pocket every visit, while they knew the bills were going to be covered by ins. of person who hit me. Still don’t have a total on this.
Are system is awful and getting worse by the day.


#8

On the 12th of this month I have a visit with a new Doc for injections into my spine. If he doesn’t have a hardship program or is willing to take Medicare assignment only I will not be able to afford the injections. I cannot sleep, walk or drive my car for extended periods. Quality of life is the issue. It took me 10 months to pay off my last MRI, I’ll not have another.


#9

The woman’s statement confirms the hypocrisy of ACA advocates claiming that so many more millions of Murkins were given insurance by the ACA.

Insurance with limited coverage is not health care reform. Insurance is a financial product, not a health care product.

When I had what was considered to be good insurance (not Cadillac, but Chevrolet and much better than Yugo) I was covered for ambulance rides only within 50 miles of where I was employed. After having to cough up a grand for an ambulance ride I kept crutches and a wheelchair at the ready so I could call a taxi if I needed to get to a hospital. Even if I gave the driver the biggest tip he ever got it would cost me a small fraction of the ambulance cost.


#10

Just one of the barbarous consequences of resisting eco-socialism.


#11

It doesn’t explain why 11 states were prevented from participating in it which would have lowered costs or the many other things that were meant to obstruct it. No, it wouldn’t be perfect because it too doesn’t address the real elephant in the room but it still provides benefit to many people and could have been much better as it was intended to be. The same can be said for Medicare before it was partially privatized.


#12

I don’t now your history Ditton but have you seen a neurologist?


#13

Ok , help me get a grip on this as I am unclear as to how the system in the US works.

Now I understand Medicare for people happens at 65 years but I am under the impression that even people of that age have to pay out of pocket for regular expenses and supplement their coverage with more insurance.

How exactly does it work and how much can it amount to out of pocket if there no supplemental insurance?

Was this always how it worked or has the system been “eroded” since first implemented?

If over 65 and requiring care and if unable to pay those extra costs, is access to treatment cut off?


#14

Wealthcare isn’t Healthcare… only monkeys and feral sub-humans don’t get it. When profit is introduced care exits and greed enters.
There isn’t any exceptions, greedcare always fails at everything except enriching psychopaths.


#15

I am just starting to use Medicare for myself as over 65 but I coordinated care for the disabled for many years.
Medicare was expanded with Medicaid. So if a medication and treatment was denied by medicare you can ask for a waiver and have it covered by Medicaid. You only got that if you knew it existed and someone applied for it.

Having said that now if medicare denies something as medically unnecessary you have a right to appeal that based on medical need.

Everyone pays a contribution to medicare through work tax deductions and employer contributions. They deduct it from your social security if your receive that. So if something in not in a formulary, you can buy insurance to cover it or use Medicaid. Part D is for pharmacy coverage.

Medicare Advantage (MA) Plans combine Part A (hospital insurance) and Part B (medical insurance) together in one plan. They can also be combined with Part D prescription drug coverage creating a Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug (MA-PD) Plan. AKA privitization


#16

in the US, Medicare for those over 65 is nothing close to the coverage the provinces provide to everyone under your single payer syatem. The only coverage that the govt provides is the “Part A” - hospitalization (and diagnostic tests in hospitals? someone please clarify). For the rest of medical care - i.e seeing doctors (Part B) and getting medications drugs (Part D) (forget dental) - and of course, ambulance service - you are required to buy you own insurance on the private market.

And yes, it has always been this way - but the difference is that the part B supplemental insurance used to be very cheap.

It sucks.

The US is barely better then the Dickensian healthcare syatem of the UK prior to NHS.

Be very thankful, every day, that you are a Canadian.


#17

No I don’t think it has always been that way, are you thinking of medical transport? When I fell and broke my leg and couldn’t work. I received state disability and all my medical expenses including the ambulance were paid.

Canada has a higher cost of living as well.


#18

Another thing…As a civil engineer who does accident investigations, I can’t fail to notice that this totally preventable accident was due to the utterly shoddy state of public transit in in the US. It is not rocket science to design platforms and subway cars with a sufficiently narrow gap and other human-factors devices so that a foot cannot fall through. And look at those subway cars! If it weren’t for that “T” logo, I would have thought that was a subway train in Kolkata, not Boston!


#19

Was it a an occupational injury? And Canada has higher wages too.


#20

I have seen many. They always find interesting things :-).