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'I Know This Is Shocking,' Says Sanders, But Trump Is 'Lying About Medicare for All'


#21

This is ridiculous, is Bernie the only politician fighting the deceptive lies of the Greedy Republican Party and their leader the Bleach Blonde Bigot??

The Republicans just wrote themselves a giant welfare check in the form of a tax cut and now they want to pay for their windfall by taking away benefits from Seniors.

What a damn disgrace, the Trumpster promised to Repeal and Replace Obamacare. He managed to destroy the program and of course he never had any intention of Replacing it.

Apparently there are enough Bigots in America to get this lying bastard re-elected. It does not matter if his Base is suffering financially so long as there fearless leader keeps the Mexicans and Muslims out of our country he will have their vote.


#22

Trump has been a master compulsive prevaricator most of his life, a common characteristic of a narcisistic psychopath - a mental sickness that 27 psychiatrists and psychologists stated in a letter that Trump has. In his announcement of his presidential candidacy, Trump “humbly” claimed that he alone understand’s America’s problems and he alone can solve them. This comes from what he claims is his unique bond with America’s middle class. Actually, median income of the Trump voter in 2016 was well above the national median income. That says that many, if not most, of the Trump voters were not the workers who had lost jobs, or were working at survival wages - like millions of workers are today despite the BLS reported 4% unemployment figures

Spurious propaganda pumps up his systematic, virulent attacks against most who disagree with him, including the performance of prior presidents: Obama’s Affordable Care Act for all, the FBI, the Justice Department, the press, the bureaucracy, international institutions (e.g., NATO, UN, all Trade Acts). Trump’s autocratic, isolationist-nationalist mindset has gone so far that being against him is being against Americans in general - not just his followers who accept carte blanche his daily ad hoc twittered one-liner attacks.and underhanded ways.

At this time, elections are the ultimate control-tool we have of our democracy, not ignoring the general public cynicism about such a statement. Voter turnout by Democrats must EXCEED the less than 55-58% range of past elections and be at least in the 65-68% range to win back the House of Representatives - thus restoring our Constitutional checks and balances system to some measure of rational, citizen-shared political sanity. (See: Francis Fukuyma’s new book, “Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment”).

But the Democrat Party will not win if the party leaders and candidates focus too much on specific “identity group” politics, thereby marginalizing pragmatically addressing concrete actions/solutions to the critical common issues our nation is facing: burgeoning income & wealth inequality; tax cut budgets that predominately enrich the already rich while accelerating national debt and interest cost in good economic times; a costly, privatized health care system that at least ±30 million Americans still cannot afford and even millions more must accept poor coverage to meet premium & deductible costs; obsolete infrastructure and poor quality pre-college educational systems that have become 3rd world realities; huge job destructive trend in force from accelerating digitilization, artificial intelligence , robotization; rapidly expanding atmospheric CO2 concentration that is threatening the livability of planet Earth and a Trump Administration that trivalizes and ignores the overwhelming peer-proven science of fundamental climate change that is geologically a near-term planet threat to all living species. And let’s not forget that world onshore/offshore oil and gas reserves will be depleted and/or technically unproducible by 2075. That’s only a TINY +55 years from now!


#23

Way ahead of any politician or party, the biggest obstacle is the massive integrated US medical-insurance industrial complex - like my state’s “UPMC” - whose CEO has stated that UPMC intends to become the “Amazon of Healthcare”. They will resist - perhaps through Chile-style economic sabotage an violence, before they would accept a national single-payer system.


#24

The US is NOT a Christian country. Let me count the ways: untreated drug addiction, enormous prison population, undernourished children, homelessness, ever-at-war, and a we-don’t-care-unless-you-have-money health care system.

It is meaningless to argue on the Christian/non-Christian fault-line, but I couln’t resist commenting.


#25

Are his lips moving? Then he’s lying. Medicare for All is way past its time in this country. While every other developed nation offers it to their citizens, we stubbornly and selfishly watch our friends, neighbors and family die of treatable conditions and diseases. We should hang our heads in disgrace and shame.


#26

Fact Check This Statement.

"Trump Is A Proven Pathological Liar."


#27

I know it is a longshot, but hopefully this will wake up a few of the scientist currently working on groundbreaking technology in America and have them emigrate somewhere civilized.
It could mean a few less killing toys for the mic if nothing else.


#28

You need some new material. That joke was outdated 10+ years ago.


#29

There were two Bleached Blonds in the 2016 presidential election.

Lord save us, or Mr. Mueller, from having even one in 2020.


#30

Or not even a service - but simply part of its public infrastructure - like roads and clean water.


#31

Following are just two links to Trump’s severe narcisistic personality disorder and compulsive lying as described by psychiatric/psychological professionals :


#32

Sure would and your point is well taken.

However the opposite is often true. We haven’t always “created” (educated) the world’s greatest minds, in the past they immigrated to US from somewhere else. For instance, we have a German to thank for rocket technology and the space program in the US, Werhner von Braun. The men on the Manhattan Project were all immigrants save for one. Many of these people were escaping Nazism and war in Europe and believed the US to be a safer place to live, it was – then.

But heck, we have our own Nobel Peace Prize winning president, the Drone King. If this is any indication of things to come, the next democratic president after Trump will be awarded some sort of Nobel too. (We all know Obama was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize shortly after he won the election for not being Bush, Jr.) Seriously, I don’t think the committee will make that mistake again.


#33

“I do not like your Christians. They are so unlike your Christ.”
–Mohandas K. Gandhi


#34

COMMONDREAMS: Why don’t you have Share buttons for this article? It makes one wonder if you do not want it traced to you, and is not in keeping with what other progressive online organizations do. It also diminishes your reach which is not good since you are a great source of REAL news!


#35

If you examine enough of the nobel recipients of the past, it becomes abundantly clear that the “peace prize” is now nothing more than a propaganda tool used to whitewash warcriminals.
In fact, the prize itself was intended to whitewash the history of the man who invented dynamite. He also built a vast fortune from arms sales.


#36

Could be because the corporations typically attatched to a sharebutton (google, youtube facebook and twitter) are all involved in active censorship of real news.


#37

…Medical prices are controlled in various ways in the rest of the developed world. In Japan, the land of $100 melons and tiny $10,000 per month apartments, all medical care prices are listed in a book, thicker than the Manhattan telephone directory. The prices set in the book are usually less than a third of those in the USA. An MRI that costs $1,200 in the USA costs $88 in Japan. Japanese insurance companies are private as are most doctors. Japan spends less than a third per capita on medical care than America. However, the Japanese are greater consumers of medical care than Americans. They visit doctors and hospitals more often, have much more diagnostic tests such as MRIs. They also have better health outcomes as measured by all metrics such as life expectancy. They also wait less for treatment than Americans do as Japanese doctors work much longer hours for their much lower incomes.
Japan’s explicit price controls are roughly emulated in other countries via the use monopsonistic systems. Monopsony, meaning “single buyer” is the flip side of monopoly. A monopolist sets prices above free market equilibrium. A monopsonist sets prices below free market equilibrium. It does not matter if there is an actual single payer or many buyers (or payers) whose prices are set by the government or by insurance companies in collusion with each other…
http://seekingalpha.com/article/1647632

I cannot see any scenario where current Medicare beneficiaries are not given substantial economic incentives to support the new arrangement. Those are the only ones who have to be given enough if monopsonistic healthcare price control system such as Medicare-for-all has any chance of being enacted. After that, there are various interests that may or may not be given incentives or compensation to go along. Those incentives could be permanent or phased out over time.

There are two major obstacles that must be addressed before any Medicare-for-all legislation could have any chance of being enacted. One is the way it will be financed and two is what would be the status of current Medicare beneficiaries. The latter is the more interesting, in that potentially a powerful group could be switched from extreme opponents of it to allies.

The first reaction from many current Medicare beneficiaries to the idea of Medicare-for-all, might be related to the issue of others getting immediately what they have paid into for many years while they did not get any benefits. At minimum, current Medicare beneficiaries would chafe at the idea of having to pay new taxes to pay for Medicare-for-all, and not getting anything for those taxes, other than the Medicare already have now.

The challenge of convincing younger people to pay taxes in return for not having to pay for medical care and/or health insurance premiums either directly or through their employers is surmountable. The USA spends about twice as much per person on health care as other developed countries. However, the prices paid by Americans or their insurance carriers for medical procedures are typically about triple what is paid in other developed countries. Hence, Americans consume less health care services than many of their foreign counterparts. The money saved from a monopsonistic healthcare cost control system like Medicare-for-all, could be allocated among those who now pay for healthcare, leaving almost all better-off, except doctors. Convincing many people of that would not be easy.

The proposed status of current Medicare beneficiaries will be the key factor if a Medicare-for-all type system has a chance of being enacted. To put it bluntly, current Medicare beneficiaries will have to be bought-off. One fair way to garner the support of current Medicare beneficiaries would be to grant them a special deduction that could be applied to their adjusted gross income for Federal income tax purposes. The special deduction could be the total amount paid for Medicare tax by both themselves in all years that they were not receiving Medicare benefits. This would be above $100,000 for a typical couple. It might be capped at some amount so as not to benefit very high earners who may have paid much more in Medicare tax.

This special deduction could be used to reduce taxable adjusted gross income, like the way that IRA contributions do now. It could be applied in whole or in part in any tax year and any unused portion could be carried over. This would cause an increase in the Federal deficit. However, the fiscal impact would diminish over the course of a few years, since there will not be any new individuals who had paid Medicare tax but not obtained Medicare benefits. Thus, it would be essentially a one-time cost. This concept is not unlike the $2 trillion one-time cost that was assumed in the various ideas to privatize Social Security. However, the cost to the treasury would be more like $800 billion.

It would be very easy for current Medicare beneficiaries to estimate how much they would gain from the special deduction. The Social Security website shows the total amount than any individual and their employers have paid in Medicare tax. The 55 million current Medicare beneficiaries are arguably the most powerful voting block in America. There are slightly less than 1 million professionally active physicians in the USA, about half being primary care physicians and the other half specialists. There is a question as to whether the proponents of a Medicare-for-all type system would be savvy enough to make it worthwhile for many of the 55 million current Medicare beneficiaries to mobilize for Medicare-for-all. If they did it would be difficult to block such a movement…"
https://seekingalpha.com/article/4111577


#38

M4A is vastly improved!
The Medicare for All bill H.R. 676 originally put forward by John Conyers in 2003, has recently been re-introduced in Congress by Keith Ellison and has 123 co-sponsors in Congress.

H.R. 676 is now called National Improved Medicare for All or NIMA.

Why is H.R. 676 “Improved” Medicare for All?

  1. Unlike traditional Medicare, H.R. 676 NIMA will cover everyone, rich and poor alike, so that its budget can not be cut or under funded. H.R. 676 NIMA will cover all medical, prescription, dental, vision, long term care, & mental health needs. Everyone will be covered from prenatal to end of life.

  2. H.R. 676 NIMA will have no premiums, no co-pays, no deductibles . H.R. 676 NIMA will be funded by using the federal budgets/funds from the current federal programs (i.e. Medicare, Medicaid, ACA, CHIP, FEHB ). H.R. 676 NIMA will also be funded by new taxes, but only for those who can afford to pay (progressive taxation).

  3. H.R. 676 NIMA removes all for profit insurance companies as well as removes all ACO’s and HCO’s (Accountability and Health Care Organizations) that siphon off even more millions for administration as part of the “oversight” and regulation/risk management of the current system.

  4. Contrary to what the President stated, H.R. 676 National Improved Medicare for All will not “eviscerate” senior’s current coverage but expand senior’s current coverage , allowing seniors their CHOICE of not only doctors, clinics, and providers, but most importantly their choice of Long Term Care (LTC)with Home and Community Based Services.

Currently, LTC is not covered by Medicare. You either have to purchase your own LTC insurance or be forced onto Medicaid, as proposed by Senator Sanders. Unlike Senator Sander’s proposal, LTC for seniors and the disabled under H.R. 676 NIMA will not be “Medicaid” . Medicaid is currently the main federal program where an individual can access LTC if they can’t afford LTC insurance. Because Medicaid only serves the poorest of seniors and other poor disabled of any age, if a middle class family needs LTC, they are forced to “spend down” and deplete all their assets in order to qualify and receive any LTC through Medicaid. Medicaid is currently 90% managed care so all federal money is going to big insurance companies where access to needed care is routinely denied. Medicaid does not cover everything, especially chronic and severe conditions, vision and dental. Medicaid pays very little so a limited number of providers can participate. Using the Medicaid program for LTC is one of the main reasons why Senator Sander’s single payer bill S.B. 1804 falls short. (Besides the fact that S.B. 1804 will still include the for profit insurance companies).

According to a recent article in the LA Times, long term care for an increasing population of seniors and chronically ill is one of the most important issues of our time.

“Who on earth is going to do this job for essentially minimum wage? You could go work at Starbucks and have a lot less stress in your life.”

’It’s been especially difficult for advocates to shake off the sense that caring for the elderly is a family matter, not one of statewide concern. Donna Benton, professor of gerontology at USC, said the strain that aging can cause for seniors and their families has long been seen as “a private affair.”

“But domestic violence used to be considered a private affair,” Benton added. “This is a public health issue now.”

We need to address this impending crisis of long term care for seniors and the disabled by enacting a comprehensive H.R. 676 NIMA.

In closing, as a home bound, disabled, low income senior (that is at present being denied health care under Medicaid managed care), I know that H.R. 676 NIMA is the only equitable way to address our health care needs.

H.R. 676 National Improved Medicare for All is the only Pro-Senior, Pro-Choice, Pro-Consumer health care bill.

I am not a Democrat or a Republican and according to a recent new poll by Reuters/IPSOS nearly 85% of Democrats and 52% of Republicans support Medicare for All. They apparently didn’t poll independents, a larger group than either major party, but other polls have found majority support among independents.

And even though the poll gives us valuable information, party affiliation should not be an arbiter of what kind of health care we receive. Enacting H.R. 676 NIMA will cover us all under one safe umbrella, including Congress and the President. And when H.R. 676 NIMA becomes law, it won’t preclude the President, Congress, or anyone from purchasing their own private health insurance if they so desire.
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