Home | About | Donate

In Colorado 'Sacrifice Zone,' Break Free Protest Escalates Fight Against Fossil Fuels


#1


#2

Protest is in the air. People are awake and getting angry at how they are being taken advantage of by the status quo oligarchy.

It is okay to protest. It is your right as Americans. Some folks consider having a gun is a right ...

And other people consider having a voice in what is done in their names is a right.

Protesting is your right!


#3

With over 50,000 active wells in the state Coloradans know what an industrial sacrifice zone is. And yes protest is a right protected under the free speech clause in the first amendment of the U.S. Constitution. But just as important is the understanding that self defense is also a right. People have to learn that energy extraction is an assault on the living and as such should be fought with as much tenacity and ferocity as possible. Already the self defense defense has been used successfully. Use it a lot. Make the oil boys pay and pay and pay for their assaults on us. They have benefitted enough at our expense. Lobby your congressman and senator to stop subsidies to energy companies and to close tax loopholes to take away the obscene profits these boys make. Enough is enough.


#4

If you don't like fossil fuel,

a. Use less of it to heat your home.

b. Help to engineer a slightly better way of saving solar heat for heating your home at night. Many little improvements will add up, and soon nobody else on eaarth will use fossil fuel either.


#5

"The right that corporations have to [extract fossil fuels] does not usurp our most basic rights to an atmosphere that can sustain life as we know it," saidMicah Parkin, executive director of 350 Colorado, the state affiliate for grassroots group 350.org, which is backing the global movement."

"Colorado and the public lands of the West are being treated as a sacrifice zone, with corporations profiting from the destruction of our communities, the landscape, and the people’s health,"

Why, and I will repeat, why, should the public continue to stand for corporate - government collusion to maximize profits while minimizing health considerations of nearby citizens, to include young children and school children. The answer is 'we aren't'. People around the world are rising up. Revolution is in the air. The fossil fuel industry is killing the Earth and it's living inhabitants with the blessings of our government. This is unsustainable. Colorado's governor Hickenlooper and our US Senator Bennet are both Democrats, and are both backing and even encouraged and instigated the Colorado lawsuits against our local communities efforts to protect the health of local school children and citizens from the proven health hazards of fracking and other oil drilling hazards to air and water (I am a democrat). Their political careers should end here with their outrageous records as tools and puppets for and of the oil industry. We don't allow liquor stores in residential areas and near schools. Why in hell should we allow the oil-gas industry to invade our neighborhoods? The why is political corruption and money. It's our duty to the next generation to stand up to industry and government on behalf of the next generations. While we are at it, let's send Hickenlooper and Bennet packing. A little tar and feathers might send a good message!


#6

Citizen lobbying does no good. Vote them out of office. We don't have the money or lobby influence that industry has. We do have the votes, though. The parties give us candidates; we give them one term to prove themselves then we vote them out. This is Constitutional revolution.


#7

“Sentiment without action is the ruin of the soul.”

― Edward Abbey

Give 'em hell!


#8

Bravo Colorado, please help preserve the beauty of your state, I'd love to join in on your civil disobedience actions when I can it is a worthy cause and our moral obligation.


#9

We also have the numbers increasing by the year as poverty strikes what's left of the middle class.


#10

At first, I thought BLM (Bureau of Land Management) stood for Black Lives Matter, and thought "wow, the various movements are really coming together and supporting each other's cause". It may not be quite so, but it's still a great mobilization.


#11

Hey Deirdre & Common Dreams, Please change the photo credit to Olivia Abtahi, Survival Media Agency, as she is the one who took this image. I can provide links if you need to verify.

Thanks for your assistance. Get in touch if you have any questions.

Shadia
Break Free 2016 Photo Curator


#12

It's commonly used in the western states to mean public lands


#13

Here in Montana it has gotten the nickname Bureau of Livestock and Mining...similar to the United States Forest Circus.


#14

We are terribly disappointed in our Governor Hickenlooper and the state for allowing oil and gas to call the shots. We are very close to the spring run off from snow melt and when it runs it runs hard and often over rides the banks of rivers across the state. This water feeds farms across Colorado and other states that depend on it. The last time it flooded farm land and wells in the Northern part of our state the rivers became polluted from wells that were in the flood plane. Many downstream had to stop using the water while it gushed pollution. We are sick of being sold out. Our state is important to so many that depend on our water we cannot allow the oil and gas companies to destroy our air, water and way of life. We appreciate the activists that have come to help us fight these sold out politicians that make a deal with the devil and then expect us to be quiet about it.
Hickenlooper didn't want marijuana to be legalized and said it many times, but when you look at him and his involvement in Craft Beer sales you see why. He has no problem with alcohol since he has always been heavily invested there and in fact had a beer tap installed in the Governors mansion. What a guy! He's the typical blue dog democrat and he wonders why Republicans took so many seats in the last election.


#15

Hickenlooper was also a geologist for the petroleum industry in the 1980's.