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In Defense of My Fellow Sanders Delegates


#1

In Defense of My Fellow Sanders Delegates

Tom Gallagher

By now everyone who cares to knows that some Bernie Sanders delegates did some booing on the first day of the Democratic National Convention. Even booed Sanders himself when he spoke in support of Hillary Clinton. And then some of them even walked out of the convention hall after the roll call finally gave Clinton the nomination. Understandably, the usual condemnation has followed – from the usual sources. Well, I’m a delegate who did no booing and did no walking, but I want to say a few words in defense of my confreres.


#2

Gallagher writes near the end:
"Hillary Clinton is no way what we wanted in a president. So if it takes some of our people, particularly the ones who are new to politics, a while to reconcile to the situation that there’s no way around the fact that either she or Donald Trump goes to the White House and that she is the better option, well, I think we give them some time."

Sorry Tom, and thanks for your work, but there's a lot of evidence that Clinton is not just "no way what we wanted," but is in fact a hugely risky and dangerous person to put in the White House. Irrespective of Donald Trump. Picking "Who's worse?" between two horrifically dangerous people is not a game i'm playing. BOTH are "worse."

Booooo, and walk out on both of them.


#4

Gallagher doesn't think the election for the nomination was stolen? How would he describe it? Just "rigged"?

Those of us who donated more money than we could really afford, and put in countless hours working for Bernie, are walking out of the Democratic Party, along with our delegates. #NeverHillary #JillNotHill #DemExit .


#6

This Gallager guys seems to be WAY out of touch. It is the scum that stayed and supported the corrupt Hillary Clinton who were "badly behaved".


#7

I appreciate Gallagher's position. I've been arguing the same thing here and elsewhere, though I think this kind of talking is a valuable way of doing, and one of the lessons that the mainstream parties need to learn if they are to survive (which I don't mind if they don't). I may take a glance at his book, especially curious about what he may have to say about 3rd parties, but from scanning his "about," I'm unlikely to spend $15 toward an argument that the 2-and-only parties are the way of the future rather than the past. I hope Gallagher may rewrite from what he's learned from inside the Sanders campaign, which demonstrates that independence is the way of the future, and of principled governance.


#8

" So if it takes some of our people, particularly the ones who are new to
politics, a while to reconcile to the situation that there’s no way
around the fact that either she or Donald Trump goes to the White House
and that she is the better option, well, I think we give them some time."

I am not new to politics, Tom. I remember Nixon. Candidates to his right will never get my vote. Period.


#9

I am at a loss to understand the mindset of the Democrats who fail to see the corruption and lies within their party even after it was shown to them in the leaks. With the exception of those of us who are leaving the party (as I am doing this week, changing my party affiliation-- although I had already left, emotionally, after voting for Stein in 2012) , most members are focusing on the source of the leaks ("Russian hackers," Putin trying to influence our elections).


#11

Tom, Ever hear of Jill Stein. ??? Write about Jill's platform, if you dare.


#12

Sorry Tom, but the Bernie delegates who are not willing to go along with the Dem-alt version of oligarchy do not need any defending, they are the future. That Hillary and the DNC gave not an inch to the progressive agenda is proof that they are clueless to the reality of their own vulnerability. Many delegates walked out of the convention and threw away their credentials as it became obvious that what the Democratic convention offered progressive America was little different than the Republicans except for the much improved production values. The lack of substance of last night’s affair portends a profound lack of support (certainly enthusiasm) going into the general election, something certainly not in short supply in the Trump camp. The movement did not come to Philly to fix the system, they came to overthrow it. If the idea was to co-opt and harness that energy, the HRC campaign failed miserably.


#14

This groveling apologetic defense is totally unnecessary -- instead, Bernie delegates should have been even more "badly behaved" given what is at stake (only the planet) and the way millions of his followers have been shafted. Revolutions are not polite.


#16

I'm getting more than a little tired of these sorts of pieces on CD, to the point I'm about to stop looking at the site.

As others have suggested, and I emphatically agree, there should be more coverage of Jill Stein and the Green Party, owing to their platform being virtually identical to Bernie's.

There are more than two choices.

I happen to love their slogan -
"The Greater Good Not The Lesser Evil"

Green 2016


#17

In fact, from her website:

“My Power to the People Plan creates deep system change, moving from the greed and exploitation of corporate capitalism to a human-centered economy that puts people, planet and peace over profit.

It offers direct answers to the economic, social, and ecological crises brought on by both corporate political parties. And it empowers the American people to fix our broken political system and make real the promise of democracy.

This plan will end unemployment and poverty; avert climate catastrophe; build a sustainable, just economy; and recognize the dignity and human rights of everyone in our society and our world. The power to create this new world is not in our hopes, it’s not in our dreams - it’s in our hands.”

Check it out! http://www.jill2016.com/plan


#19

Will Hillary ever lead in the polls again?


#21

Yeah. Don't be too hard on those poor naive children who think they can change the system. They've not become accustomed to losing. Maybe, after a few batons to the head, they'll realize the futility of their actions and fall in line.

"We are at war with (Middle) Eastasia. We have always been at war with (Middle) Eastasia. Vote $hillary."


#22

You're absolutely right. Independence is the way of the future.

Depending of which polls you consult, the percentage of registered Independent voters is somewhere between 39 and 42 percent. That puts both registered Democrats and Republicans in the 25 to 30 percent range.

If the Bernie or Bust people want to make a real statement, they can change their voter registrations from Democrat to Independent.

If they are willing and able to stay organized and begin work on 2020 now, the critical mass of the disenfranchised Sanders voters just might make a difference in the next election.


#27

I plan to send out the form (required in NJ) yet this week or early next. I changed from unaffiliated to D only for the opportunity to vote for Bernie and was waiting only for the word from Bern/end of the convention. We need to work toward fully privatizing all parties and removing party designations from those in office. Government must be independent. Close the aisle.


#28

How can you participate in a conversation about an article without reading the article? That's rude to the community.


#31

Tom Gallagher, that has to be the most bassackwards, left-handed defence of anyone or anything that I have read in a long time.

What's the matter?

You want to tell me that a) the deck was stacked in a high-stakes game, but that b) you did not get robbed. Come on, Tom; I've played cards. The deck was stacked, and even the DNC had to admit it after Wikileaks blew the whistle. That's theft. It's fraud.

It is an act of despotism. Is that not relevant?

And Sanders is not the only one who got robbed and defrauded by Clinton, the DNC, and the sitting president when they decided to abrogate the democratic process.

Walking out of a meeting is just the start, Tom. It is a kindness designed to make it visible to the DNC and to you and to me the results of the DNC actions in aborting the democratic process. It is not some kind of slip or immature oversight, or something done because people do not want to stay at their desks and work. Booing Sanders when he endorses Clinton is an attempt to communicate and a kindness. We ought to have the wit to see it.

The delegates tried to communicate to Sanders, but also to you, to me, to the DNC, and to each other. We have no deal with the Clinton machine. In point of fact, Clinton has not to date offered one.

Misguided, apparently little thought-out attempts to "unify the party" fragment the movement. Look at the options we are left with:

  • Someone might reflexively or habitually vote Democrat, though robbed. Tom, I think that's you; supply a better argument if you have one.
  • Someone might vote Donald Trump as a least-worst candidate, choosing to ignore his sexism and bigotry and apparent perversion to avoid Clinton's warlike neoliberal-neoconservative global corporate fascism. At present, that includes most of the Sanders supporters that I have met.
  • Someone might imagine that it is not worth voting, since the system is obviously rigged--and because, Tom, anyone and everyone knows that rigging a card game is theft, theft, theft. I suspect that this includes well over 50% of the people who otherwise more or less roughly agree with you or I about politics.
  • Someone might vote for a 3rd-party candidate and take the loss that will come anyway in the hopes of building towards a real victory.

I would say that is logical, and that booing Sanders and walking out of the undemocratic convention is a logical place to start.

You-all want to lead a movement, you have to get out in front and start going the right direction. It's moving.


#33

Even further off topic and rude to those of us here for civil discussion.


#34

Bernie will go back and continue to do good work for us all, standing in the middle of the partisan aisle in the Senate. And if the Ds manage to retake the Senate, he's in a position to chair the budget committee. That may well be part of what he required, along with the platform planks, for his nonconcession.