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In Latest Fit of Censorship, Facebook Deletes Video Detailing Brutal Legacy of Christopher Columbus


#1

In Latest Fit of Censorship, Facebook Deletes Video Detailing Brutal Legacy of Christopher Columbus

Jon Queally, staff writer

With nothing but a vague "violation of community standards" note and offering no ability to appeal the decision, Facebook has once again blocked a piece of critical journalism—this time a short documentary video depicting the brutal legacy of Christopher Columbus—from its global online platform.

"Monbiot’s piece of video journalism was about the airbrushing of history; therefore, there is a great irony in the fact it has now been airbrushed from their platform." —Yannis Mendez, Double Down News


#2

Why are you still on Facebook?? I have read the excuses on previous posts but if censorship of the treatment of the First Nations who have been brutally and unjustly treated by not only the first white invaders but also by too many of their descendants today who continue this legacy then you need to examine both your conscience and your heart. Your head has already done its part in the excuses and rationalizations. Native Peoples are presently being disenfranchised in North Dakota to further silence them. Indigenous peoples and their cultures are a life line to answers to dealing with our collective ecological crisis.


#3

The “first nation” Aztecs enjoyed human sacrifice as recently as 500 years ago. In one day they sacrificed some 20,000 people if my memory serves. The Apache were so brutal to neighboring tribes that the arrival of the US Cavalry was actually the only historical development that saved some of the surrounding tribes from extermination. (Carey Mc Williams, North from Mexico)
All people have viciousness in them.
Censorship is evil.


#4

I am aware of the history of this Turtle Island and what the Aztecs did does not justify what white folks did and continue to do to the indigenes all while claiming a “christian” ethos. The experiment of the USA needed to have occurred in England. Thank you.


#5

Exactly, two wrongs do not make a right.


#6

Facebook started becoming weird five or six years ago. Try something new. How about email?


#7

I can be a wee-bit radical at times, it’s true. Months ago I found myself blocked by f/b for a second time. Which is fine by me but I cannot get there to delete my profile all on my own. I’m just blocked. I feel bad for those locked up inside. Much like foxnews, they are the great arbitrator of the “real news”. So bad it has come to this but wasn’t it a long way down?


#8

Skype chat for family. Put them all in your Skype group.

You can also get a free chat board and have your family and friends chat there. I’ve used FreeForums.net for this.


#10

If it wasn’t for the internet, we would be discussing the weekly book burnings.


#11

The truth is destabilizing.


#12

Interesting, free forum? https://www.proboards.com


#13

The video is very compelling. And as far as i can see is the truth. Today the same atrocities are being visited upon people all over the world.


#14

That link did not work for me Rainy.


#15

I use FB regularly. We have moved many times and I make good friends all over the country and the world. I also have family all over the country. Telling me to get off FB is stupid and ignorant - just because some people don’t have a wide circle of friends they want to keep up with doesn’t mean everyone does. Your ‘ solutions’ , writ large, clearly would not be convenient or workable.
I just posted this article ON FB. So my many peeps can go to the link which i know quite a few might.
Try getting out of your own heads thinking everyone in the world is like you for a damn while.


#16

The danger of censorship is it allows us to censor the real motives for our actions. This can have disastrous consequences. It stops us facing the critical questions. Most importantly today: why have we fought two world wars in the last hundred years, and look as though we are going to have a third very soon?

It is because we are motivated by desire for power (manifested as interest). It is present in every conflict in human history – no exception. It is the one thing we will destroy ourselves for, as well as everyone else.

It blinds us to the truth that every nation/civilization eventually gets the war it is trying to avoid: utter defeat. This applies as much today as any other time in history. Deterrence doctrine will fail because of its very success. Leaders and decision-makers delude themselves into thinking they can avoid their fate – they can’t. If survival is threatened, there is no alternative to war, however destructive. They can’t see it.

https://www.ghostsofhistory.wordpress.com/


#17

Historical nonvisionism


#18

If anyone is really interested in the “real Columbus” I recommend Columbus and the Quest for Jerusalem by Prof. Carol Delaney (or look on YouTube for talks by or interviews of her concerning her book).

The current revisionist history about Columbus, the Terrible, equal of Cortez and Pizarro as well as Genghis Khan and Hitler, is even more myth than the old flat earth one, and has been cooked up out of self-righteous posturing and political correctness as much as incompetent scholarship by Howard Zinn, Kirkpatrick Sales, Hans Konig, and now Mombiot, plus many others who parrot such views to feel as if they have the “true history”. The facts to be gathered from his Journal, letters and Spanish documents tell us that he, for his part, generally admired and had good relations with the natives but could never control the rapacity and brutality of the men under him. He often instructed them in person and in letters not to take from or abuse the Indians or rape their women, that the Indians were good people who had been hospitable and helpful whose respect must not be lost. (The only natives he could not get along with and made war on, and enslaved, were the Caribs, a tribe who were the bullies of the region and enemies of his Taino Indian friends, and cannibals worst of all.) A criticism often made of him is, that he was not a good administrator. The Spanish crown relieved him of that function after they determined he had been unjustly hauled back to Spain in chains for executing and abusing, not Indians, but Spaniards for their rapacious and murderous insubordination. He was, however, otherwise admired and sent back to the New World to continue his explorations twice more. As his Journals testify, he was a great explorer and navigator and are full of his uncontainable wonder and excitement and keen observations of everything he saw, the people, plants, animals, and the coasts of what he began briefly to think was not of Asia, the Indies, but an unknown new continent.

Another worthwhile book one might look into is, Columbus on Himself, an autobiographical compilation of his writings, journals and letters, edited and interestingly footnoted, .by the great Spanish historian Felipe Hernandez Armesto. To understand Columbus, in relation to the new world he opened for Europeans, as well as new age his discovery initiated in humanity’s history, our complicated Modern Age, one must discover him in context (as we people who really study and care about history say).


#19

Glad to see that such an important article has been reposted. I am not a Facebook user but it apparently can be a source of information that we all need to know. Our history textbooks which had the Catholic Imprimatur meaning it was okayed by the Church neglected to tell us what happened to the native populations after Columbus landed. It is a tragic and gruesome story overshadowed by a puff piece about what a great hero Columbus was for thinking that the earth was round. Lots of people at the time thought that. When we are taught to be simplistic we turn into simpletons. But life is not simple; it is complicated. Every event involving people can be good for some and perhaps not so good for others. Only telling us about the good parts does not prepare us for life. People who want to celebrate Columbus Day could make the world he discovered a better place by recognizing and mourning the events that happened as a result. It should be a day of remembrance and atonement and respect for the Native peoples whose world was destroyed by Columbus personally, and all those who followed him across the ocean, enslaving the natives, insisting that they follow the religion of the Europeans, and all the evils that came after. We cannot act appropriately about things we never knew about. There are plenty of things to celebrate in our daily lives but Columbusis not one of them.


#20

…Facebook, probably ten times larger than Ma Bell was…it’s about freakin’ time to ‘break it up’, this overlord crap is boiling my blood, fuck you Facebook and the despicable greedsters that you rode in on…


#21

I don’t know what words Yannis Mendez uaed, but the article refers to
publications as “content” and says it is legitimate to delete
“inappropriate” publications. The term “content” disparages all
publications, regardless of what is good or bad about them.

See https://gnu.org/philosophy/words-to-avoid.html#content

There are valid reasons to delete some publications, but in order for
a reason to be valid, it must be statable in a concrete way.
“Inappropriate” is never sufficient.

See https://stallman.org/antiglossary.html#inappropriate.

If you access the video (or anything) on youtube, for your freedom’s
sake I urge you to do it with youtube-dl rather than by running
the nonfree software that youtube.com sends in every page.

See https://gnu.org/philosophy/whats-wrong-with-youtube.html

Publishing on or via Facebook feeds the power of that company.
The best way to protect yourself from its censorship is to publish
elsewhere.

See https://stallman.org/facebook.html for why we should
not be used by facebook.