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In Major Win Over 'Corporate Bullying,' Seattle Approves Tax on Amazon to Combat Homelessness


#81

As most of the world recognizes from experience, it is Capitalism which is evil.

It’s a system intended to move the wealth and natural resources of nations from
the many to the few – and it has done that successfully all over the world.


#82

All of those countries killed thousands to millions of their own people. That has nothing to do with the US. You’re just as evil as those leaders if you are going to sit here and blame every atrocity committed by those countries, some of which are the worst in human history, on the US.

I’m not going to defend the US’s meddling in foreign affairs. I’m against it, as well. But I’m not going to say that Mao’s extermination of his own people through summary executions of dissenters and his self-induced famine that killed tens of millions was the fault of the US.


#83

tv –

No one has killed more people than the invaders/Founders here –

US/CIA has killed millions all over the world – and for openers committed Genocide
vs the native people here – 112 million of them. Too bad they didn’t have a WALL.

300 years and more of the enslavement of Africans here –

Recently 1 million Muslims killed in US/CIA “illegal wars of aggression.”

What did US do in Vietnam?

Or two wars in Iraq?

Or the land they’ve taken with and without war – Mexican land – Hawaii.

Wherever you look in the world, the US is responsible for death and destruction.

PS: If you don’t like communism, consider that it is likely that Elites created it.
You can’t have your own system under challenge – you need an enemy system.
James Marrs, among others, writes on that subject.
I guess I should write something about that in one of my next posts.


#84

I’m not going to sit here and defend US interventionism abroad. As someone who would be described mostly as an isolationist who thinks that the US’s only purpose for ever using military intervention is for if our national security is at risk, I will generally claim that our entire military history of the 20th and early 21st century has gone beyond that threshold with the exception of World War II.

But it would be insane to not differentiate between the US military killing Taliban fighters and Mao summarily rounding up and executing dissenters of the Chinese communist regime. Certainly the deaths attributed to US military intervention includes civilians. But you can’t just add up every death from the US wars and claim that they are equal to what the communist regimes did to their own people.

Similarly, I also highly question your number of native Americans killed by the US. While certainly that many people may have died subsequent to Europeans landing on American shores, most were attributed to natural exposure to new diseases. That’s not genocide. And our history is deplorable. But I wouldn’t even attribute it to “capitalism” either, or at least “free market” capitalism. Free market capitalism involves protection of property rights. A government arbitrarily claiming land from people who rightfully own it is not free market capitalism. In a free market system, the white Americans would have had to purchase that land in a voluntary exchange. So the confiscation of the land was the absence, not the culmination of capitalism.

In general, and just as a starting point, what you’ve done is conflate international military interventionism with economic systems. What one system of government does with its military can be separate and distinct from its economic system. If I want to compare the 30 million murdered by Mao to an equivalent phenomenon in the US, I wouldn’t compare it to the Iraq War. I’d have to compare it to a non-existent situation in which people were rounded up and executed for…well, I don’t know, because it’s never happened here.

I can cite the millions murdered by socialist regimes because they are inherently an extension of the economic/political system. In order to have a dictatorship of the proletariat, you can have no dissenters of the government. An dissension must be stomped out by any means necessary. In contrast, you cannot cite slavery or the deaths of native Americans in the US, because those historical facts are not aspects of capitalism. They are the antithesis of capitalism. They are the purest form of the violation of property rights. Ones own body is her first and foremost form of property rights. Slavery is the confiscation of that right. And the theft of land is obviously another. So you could consider those historical facts blots on our history because we strayed from capitalism. But you cannot say that slavery equals capitalism. Doing so slanders the definition of free market capitalism and leads to a straw man discussion.


#85

tv –

“National Security” label is BS which is used to hide US criminal behavior.

Our Founders still lead – along with “Christiantiy” in deaths – based in earliest works of the invaders.

Latest number on native Americans is 112 million dead in genocide to steal their land.

“Natural Exposure to new diseases” … ?
You mean the filth the invaders brought with them.
And which they purposefully used to kill native people here?

Rather the GENOCIDE went on even into the period of “Church Schools” run by the Catholic
Church and the Mormon Church under control to our government – which existed for the
purpose of disconnecting native children from their parents – brainwashing them – destroying
knowledge of their own language, families and traditions. In those schools they were beaten,
mutilated, murdered, hung – sexually abused. Their parents were not permitted to see them.
Often the children were kidnapped from their parents.

Where did “free market” capitalism protect the PROPERTY RIGHTS/land of the native people here?
Even today, our Congress continues to co-opt native natural resources and prevents them from
sustaining themselves – and continues a war on native people with the purpose of continuing
the land theft.


#86

Again, even if I take everything you just wrote at face value, what you’re describing is the effect of the US government on the native people, not free market capitalism. I already explained the distinction. Stealing someone’s land is the antithesis of free market capitalism. So the US “theft” of native lands is not an example of a free market failure; it’s an example of the absence of the free market.


#87

tv –

There is no such thing as “free market capitalism” …

What exists and what we have is …

“Welfare for the Rich – And Free Enterprise for the Poor.”

Read the UN article, for instance – isn’t that why you’re here to read and learn?

Scathing UN Report Condemns Trump and GOP for ‘Deliberately’ Driving Up Already Devastating Inequality

"At the end of the day, particularly in a rich country like the United States, the persistence of extreme poverty is a political choice made by those in power."

And I’ll repeat it for you …

the persistence of extreme poverty is a political choice made by those in power."


#88

You once again are talking past me, hopefully not deliberately.

I have never claimed that the US exhibits pure free market capitalism. It is certainly closer to a free market system than Nazi Germany or Mao’s China. But it is still a mixed economy with massive government intrusion: healthcare (Medicare and Medicaid, no price transparency); education (subsidized tuition rates); energy (subsidies for favored industries, like oil, solar and wind); and numerous other examples.

It’s interesting that the article uses the term “extreme poverty.” America doesn’t have extreme poverty per global standards. Socialist/communist/dictatorship countries do.


#89

tv –

It seems that you see a “people’s” government as “massive government intrusion”
on the system of capitalism which is a “for profit” system for private interests – and
often protected by the US military.

You also continue to misrepresent democratic socialism practiced by many Western
European nations. As well as alleging there have been “communist” countries where
in reality there has NEVER been a truly communist country, only dictatorships.

Neither am I aware of any other RICH country the United Nations has called out in this way…

"At the end of the day, particularly in a rich country like the United States, the persistence of extreme poverty is a political choice made by those in power."

Again, I repeat for you:

… the persistence of extreme poverty is a political choice made by those in power."


#90

No. You just seem to be defining corporatism or state capitalism as free market capitalism, when they are not the same. Trying to claim that they are the same would be claim that the economic system that existed in Nazi Germany was equivalent to the economic system that existed in America in the mid-to-late 1800s, which is the closest we’ve come to free market capitalism.


#91

Again … Let me repeat this for you so you’re perfectly clear on what I am saying to you …

In America … now more than ever … there is only –

"WELFARE FOR THE RICH – AND FREE ENTERPRISE FOR THE POOR."

and …

… the persistence of extreme poverty is a political choice made by those in power."


#92
  1. What you wrote is an opinion and not factual. The poor are getting richer in America.
  2. I’m not even defending the current economic system as a beacon of laissez faire capitalism. I’ve written to that effect ad nauseum. There are numerous aspects of our economy that are socialist and that hold us back; numerous examples of subsidies, partial or full nationalization, taxation, etc.

#93

tv –

What you are writing is your opinion and also not factual –

  1. The poor are getting richer in America.

  2. There are numerous aspects of our economy that are socialist and that hold us back;

You’re suggesting that all statistics about growing poverty in America –
and the United Nations observations – are all wrong?

And the suffering of impoverished Americans we see every day are just lies?

and additionally …

Libraries and fire departments “are holding us back”?

Guess you also mean public education?


#94

Evidence (I note that these initial articles are about global poverty, but the dynamic is the same in America):
https://www.forbes.com/sites/kenrapoza/2015/10/04/not-only-are-the-rich-getting-richer-so-are-the-poor/#702a890077d3

You picked two hilarious examples: libraries and fire departments. You presumably side-stepped what you knew I’d be referring to: subsidies for college tuition, Medicare and Medicaid, subsidies for oil and renewable energy, farm subsidies, tariffs, price controls and rent controls, licensure laws that force almost half of all jobs in America to have some form of a license (which hurts, first and foremost, the poor), the minimum wage, taxes on behavior and personal choice… Those are just a few.


#95

tv –

So you didn’t read the United Nations article – or any other article – which

makes clear that the 1% continue to steal from and further impoverish the 99%?

And you’ve become even more disingenuous in suggesting that "The poor are

getting RICHER in America." Or, revealing your delusional thinking. Which is it?

Subsidies for college tuition? The government has been making a profit of tens of BILLIONS from Student Loans bankrupting former students. And the government’s encouragement of corporate takeover’s of our colleges and universities have increased the wealth of the and Real Estate of those Institutions while triping and quadrupling the yearly tuition rates, making them unaffordable for the majority of students. Local and Community colleges have also only INCREASED tuition fees for students.

Medicare costs paid for by Seniors continue to be INCREASED which the coverage continues to DECREASE. Both Medicare and Medicaid programs are being reduced and FUNDING CUT in order to pay for the DECREASE in corporate taxes which is a WINDFALL for corporations.

No fossil fuel nor nuclear facility should be being bailed out or subsidized as they represent increasing danger for the planet and humans.

Corporations have pretty much bought out all of the family farms, so you are talking about subsidizes for large corporations and unfortunately many factory farms which also are doing great harm to our rivers, lakes and streams. Again, you are talking about rent control which basically no longer exists in the US as the New Deal regulations have been largely overturned by corporations using their wealth to buy our elected officials. The Minimum wage is now .25% LESS than what it was worth in the 1950’s.

The answer to your opinions is either delusion or misinformation –

but, again, it is embarrassing to reply to you and from here you will be talking to yourself.


#96

Actually, the fact that Seattle all but bans the construction of multi-family housing in most of the city (through zoning) has created the housing shortage and skyrocketing in rental costs.

When you restrict supply in the face of rising demand, the price goes up.


#97

Sadly interesting –

Since this homeless and impoverishment of citizens began it was
discovered that those trying to protect them from the elements here
in NYC areas were only allowed to put them up in hotel rooms – they
weren’t permitted to seek apartments for rent/lease for them, though
the costs would have been less – and the results better. Don’t know
if that’s still the rule, but it makes clear that these are filthy political decisions.


#98

And now, confronted with the fact that businesses are willing to challenge the law with a referendum, the City Council backed down and repealed the tax they created scant weeks ago.

Apparently they realized that the notion was so unpopular that it wouldn’t survive a ballot fight.


#99

Why are you posting under two user names (“Jim_Schmidt” and “jimschmidt”)? Shouldn’t one do the trick?


#100

I don’t think they have voted on the repeal measure yet - though it does look likely to pass.

The tax amounted to a 14 cents per hour per employee charge for large employers - the fuss that amazon has made over this is completely disproportional.