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In Massive Boycott of Standardized Tests, New York Students Take Stand Against Corporate Educuation


#1

In Massive Boycott of Standardized Tests, New York Students Take Stand Against Corporate Educuation

Nadia Prupis, staff writer

Tens of thousands of students in New York boycotted the annual state-mandated English Language Arts exams this week in a grassroots challenge to Governor Andrew Cuomo's controversial education agenda.


#2

I often complain about the over-reliance on public demonstrations because they can be ignored by the corporate media so no one notices them.

Boycotts are another matter, however. Even if the mainstream news channels give them no coverage, the corporations affected by them do notice. I'd like to know how much money Pearson is losing by not getting the fees for "grading" the tests that were not taken.

mcp


#3

To ascertain the professional quality of test graders, check out Craigslist for job adverts. I'm SURE the test graders are paid quite well, aren't you?


#4

However much the graders may be paid, it would be only a fraction of what the contractor would receive for their work.

mcp


#5

Good for all those students, their parents, and teachers and their supporters. End the testing mania.


#6

Good question!

But watch out. According to the superintendent of schools in Herrick /Long Island, New York has the cheap version of Pearson's tests.

And if NY buys a costlier version, there will be 100,000 questions available, thereby allowing teachers, students, and families to see all questions and answers.

Could this have been Pearson's strategy all along?


#7

Watch out. According to the superintendent of schools in Herrick /Long Island, New York has the cheap version of Pearson's tests.

And if NY buys a costlier version, there will be 100,000 questions available, thereby allowing teachers, students, and families to see all questions and answers.

Could this have been Pearson's strategy all along?


#8

I am a little puzzled about her claim that Common Core was produced by a secretive for-profit. According to the Huffington Post: "In 2006, a new bi-partisan group set out to create Common Core. It was funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and supported by publishers who realized they could make a mint with the new standards by providing textbooks, test prep material, and the high-stakes tests. Among others, Gates lined up the not-for-profit foundation operated by the Pearson for-profit educational publishing corporation to support Common Core. Because it was developed through the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers, Common Core supporters thought they could claim it was a state led initiative, not the work of the federal government or the publishing industry."


#9

It's very good that people are doing this but--My hunch is it is not only late in the game but also representative of the parent/school relationship that has evolved with all the technology being thrown at the schools. I don't know what PTA attendance is in their area, nationally it is down from when I attended public schools in California decades ago. This is a very busy generation of parents, so busy that many of them have yielded kitchen table learning that families used to have to the internet and the schools. One only has to go online and see the types of questions kids pose that are often common sense, learn at home type stuff.
These same parents probably went shopping after 911 like W Bush ordered, didn't bother to find out what NCLB was about, and gave Common Core minimal notice when it was enacted.
The time to ask for engagement is before an activity takes place, and I find it difficult to believe that a lot of parents did not see the writing on the wall with Common Core and endless standardized tests. Plus the fact that both mean massive amounts of profit for the private sector. That alone should have made people ask 'why?'