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In Secret Filing, DOJ Opposes Release of Hunger-Striking Gitmo Prisoner


#1


#3

Obama and those who surround him are vile, contemptible individuals.


#5

This is what happens when government and the people in it time and again, year after year get away with criminal actions; crimes. There is no excuse for this action. There was no excuse for the "Tiger Cages" in Vietnam. There is no excuse for the torture which occurs in prisons to prisoners in the United States today. The extra-Constitutional powers that are in control of our government, our resources and our collective wealth have destroyed any sense of morality we claim to have as a nation. Our nation is a cruel, empire. Accept it or do something about it.


#6

But it's one of of God's first names. That and five dollars will buy you a cup of coffee and do nothing for this man.


#7

"Oh beautiful, for spacious skies...Oh shit, who are we kidding?"


#8

How many times during 2007-08 did Mr. Obama preach during his campaign, "If I am elected president, I will close Guantanamo Bay prison"? One thousand times?

What a fraud he has been, in small matters and in large. Whenever I hear him speak, I get nauseous.

My daily prayer begins, "Deliver the oppressed," and I will add Tariq Ba Odah's name in my prayer, and I will ask his forgiveness for my complicity in his false imprisonment.


#9

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#10

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#11

With regard to moral depravity, this is the absolute nadir. Yes Max, Nuremberg stuff. There's nothing left to say about these pyscho freaks.

But even for their sick purposes, what does this do? This man's situation is right before the world. Are these monsters really like grade school kids who think this kind of stunt does anything at all? I just don't get it. Somebody help me out here. Or maybe Tariq Ba Odah has some very ugly stories to tell.


#12

Either secrecy or democracy, there isn't a third way.


#13

I don't get it either. "Cleared since 2009..." What the hell does this mean? Who decides to keep a man who has been cleared (and even worse has never even been charged with a crime) in prison? Is there rule of law or rule by whim? Do we keep this man in prison until he dies simply because we didn't feel like letting him go? Is that who we are? If we don't respect justice, if we don't respect our own laws, if we don't respect honor and decency then exactly what do we respect? Autocratic whim?

Is this the future we create where people are imprisoned without charge and based on evidence (if it even existed) that is secret? A star chamber proceedings? Imprisoned without any means of recourse and held for as long as somebody feels like keeping them there?

What will we write on his gravestone?

"We kept him in prison because we just felt like doing it until he died."


#14

Words simply become useless at this point ...


#15

Dynamically (psychoanalytically) oriented psychologists actually use that. It's called "countertransference". When you identify that sense of nausea, it's an indication that the person you're dealing with has what's known as a "character disorder". Such people appear normal, they are not eg. psychotic, but there is a deep level of illness. They can recover, but it takes years of work.

Don't ask where such illness comes from. Etiology is not psychology's strong suit, but it does have a well developed phenomenological system.


#16

Well, at least one commenter here understands why those prisoners are still locked up.

Originally they were jailed to make it look like the US was doing something about "terrorism"...but ever since it's been about silencing those imprisoned...can't have them speaking out in public about their experience or why they might have actually been anti-American.


#17

Obama's maliciousness recalls Richard Nixon.


#18

And most of them were not anti-American, ever before.

They were anti-US Terrorism.

Most still are.


#19

And the US lectures Cuba about human rights. Total hypocrisy.


#20

Will the US government continue to argue that the death of any detainee in Guantanamo is proof that the detainee was a "terrorist"?

Suicide by those detained at Guantanamo is "not an act of desperation, but an act of asymmetric warfare against us." - Admiral Harry B. Harris, Jr., US Navy, 2006

I wouldn't be surprised to learn that Grand Inquisitor Tomás de Torquemada (1483) issued similar commentary.


#21

It also raises a systemic question about something never discussed in these cases - the role of advisers who found their advice on statistics. Election cycle loyalties and wave after wave of distortions wouls seem to point in this direction. So obviously a political decision, it would seem to indicate that statistics regarding expected public opposition is perhaps still not strong enough to override a pathological dependence on the projected 'coherence' of interrelated statistical advantages. The implications of dehumanization in relation to power date back to Doctrine of Discovery, the "legal" rationalization for genocide of indigenous peoples, and how those get 'written into law'. A certain set of terminologies, their actual meanings and implications massaged into 'causal' oblivion never disappear, but heir consequences inevitably arise. Probably one of the most entrenched poisons in western "civilization", it seems to continually feed a culture of violent institutionalized brinksmanship.


#22

Accept it as real AND do something about it.