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Intelligence Official Overseeing Whistleblowing Cases Blows Whistle Himself


#1

Intelligence Official Overseeing Whistleblowing Cases Blows Whistle Himself

Deirdre Fulton, staff writer

An official charged with investigating whistleblower cases within the U.S. intelligence community is himself blowing the whistle on alleged "public corruption," according to new reporting by McClatchy.


#2

Until accurate reports by whistleblowers result in their promotion and success, we know we do not live in a real democracy.
Praises to all the honest whistleblowers who put their careers and personal health on the line because they are true patriots who want to be socially responsible!
The fascists can't stand that.


#4

Thank you Daniel Meyer for your service. I hope there are more civil servants with your chutzpah, who also come forward. Corruption runs so deep inside the beltway, it will probably take hundreds of whistleblowers--maybe thousands--to uncover it all.


#5

Mark, I created an account to add my agreement to your comment: I didn't exactly blow the whistle, but I did draw attention to some major corruption issues in the organization that I was with-- it was a very costly and damaging experience. Whistleblowers, truth tellers, generally get slammed. Principals are costly to live by, but I'd hate to look back at life and know that I lived as a coward. Cheers to you, brother.


#6

As a former intelligence analyst myself, I can tell you this is a common organizational hazard in any context. 'No one likes the tattletale!" goes the truism.
Rocking the boat generally comes with you in the water without a life jacket, and a half dozen oars poking at you to make sure you can't get back in the boat.

This is why people who tel the truth in these circumstances are so brave. Most people know they're going to pay a price of some kind for, at the very least, making the boss look bad.


#7

When a government spies upon a free people we are no longer free. And so it continues. Their foundation of tyranny is almost complete. Except for limited areas of governmental responsibilities such as defense only a minimal amount of secrecy is required concerning the welfare of We, The People and those who serve Us in our government.
The secrecy sprouting like dark vines from the minds of those whose aim is to oppress, control and exploit We, The People is unwarranted, undemocratic and the gruel of dictators.


#8

Obama has plenty of time to strip this man of his clearance, have him fired, charge him, ruin his career, destroy him financially and put him in prison. He has done that with every whistleblower since he took office. HRC will take the short cut: Gitmo for all and the firing squad since she loves guns and violence. Remember Qaddafi and that cackle of hers?


#9

Every time I hear that cackle I see the faces of the drowned refugee children whose lives she ruined for all time.


#10

Its like being the lone white sheep in a herd of black sheep.


#11

Reading through the comments above mine, I see that people are trying to describe their emotional feelings in words. I see in practically all of the posts feelings of hopelessness setting in. Am I, me personally, alone in this interpretation? A feeling of hopelessness by enough people is one of the big steps toward revolution.


#12

Absolutely. Posters should be held up high at the DNC reminding everyone what she has done and WHO she really is. Put that clip of her laughing about his death: We came, we saw, he died, on the wide screens and all cell phones and play it loud and clear. Drown out all their BS speeches.


#14

It's kind of Nixonian: if a whistleblower does it, it isn't a whistleblow.