Home | About | Donate

Iran’s Unlawful Reprisal (and Ours)

Originally published at http://www.commondreams.org/views/2020/01/08/irans-unlawful-reprisal-and-ours

It seems that the missiles that Iran launched were not precision instruments by any means. Surely they have such weapons. In other words, they were shooting twentieth-century spitballs. They had to respond to try to placate their population that is rightly enraged at the murder of their national hero. Likely, they will take the temperature of their people before see what, if anything, needs to be done next. Persian roots run deep, much deeper than we Americans can understand. Having a man-baby at the helm is just about the worst scenario possible in juxtaposition.

3 Likes

A “tit for tat” but let’s not forget who started that.

1 Like

The author of this article is feckless and wrong.
Iran is in full compliance with Article 51 of the UN charter:
“Nothing in the present Charter shall impair the inherent right of individual or collective self-defence if an armed attack occurs against a Member of the United Nations, until the Security Council has taken measures necessary to maintain international peace and security. Measures taken by Members in the exercise of this right of self-defence shall be immediately reported to the Security Council and shall not in any way affect the authority and responsibility of the Security Council under the present Charter to take at any time such action as it deems necessary in order to maintain or restore international peace and security.”

3 Likes

He’s wrong in spirit, at any rate. His concern about involving the UN is laughable–as if they have accomplished much in this area previously.

4 Likes

This is the kind of lawyerin that says it is ok for US to torture.
The USA does not care about the rule of law at home or abroad.

We have been harassing Iran for decades. Sanctions are a form of military embargo, an act of war.

They are entitled to stand up for themselves and this is the first time they have.

3 Likes

Inquiring minds want to know: What is stuff like this doing here on CD?

2 Likes

Sure. Just let the UN take care of it. They’ve done a stellar job so far in tempering US militarism, and Israeli war crimes, and Saudi war crimes … Sure.

2 Likes

Wow came home to “SHOCK & AWE” 17 tears ago to a dark house where only sobbing could be heard when I opened the door. Then intense worry sets in and the only thing we could do was send packages hoping for our loved ones return. Prayed everyday and wished we would have chained them into not serving while we visited our war senator and congressman’s office only to be recorded and shunned. This morphed into imagining the intense suffering going on in areas where women, men and children ARE the victims of men with the biggest weapons >insanity and lust for land and resources. American greed coupled with the desire to fulfill a religious destiny for some fucked up religious hegemony has determined the stupidest in the world can be the most destructive when given license through a deity, who has never been truly represented by any man.

Iran’s response was cool and calculated.

And as much as I differ with the theocratic nature of the hardline leadership in Tehran, I support Iran’s right to wanting, fighting for, and achieving respect and credibility in their region.

As of right now, Iran has come out the clear victor in Trump’s tantrum. Pulling the US from the JPCOA has been counterproductive by any measure. And Trump is demonstrating that while his base loves it when he talks tough, they are in no mood for another unwinnable quagmire in the MidEast. If we couldn’t handle Iraq and Afghanistan, we sure as hell can’t handle Iran, much less the entire Shiite Crescent.

2 Likes

Rationality, civility, cooperation demand the societies of the world make serious efforts to create and maintain the formations of international laws for just those reasons of rationality, civility, cooperation, and everything else that promotes sanity. The 20th century has found real efforts to do that. But the actual effect is only as strong as the participants make it. (Just ask the Palestinians, the populations in Central and South America, the victims of imperial/colonial aggression in Africa, the Mideast, Asia, Eastern Europe, where to be free of the old Soviet Block is to be a 3rd world society for western investors).

There is no intergalactic overseer to force implementation or make decisions on areas that are not already sufficiently addressed. Elite, wealthy and powerful sources that have created the present international status quo and fight with all their capacities to maintain it, are the greatest enemy to the establishment and effectiveness of international law. Except of course, in the domains of trade, monetary policies, copyrights, corporate welfare, all of which have legal priority over sovereign laws. The president of the most influential country, which is also the greatest obstructionist country on the planet towards international law, is a criminal. A dangerous, unstable criminal. It doesn’t make him the first, just the dumbest and probably the worse.

In the 1930s and into the 1940s Japan was involved in horrendous crimes with it’s military in Asia. They were doing what western powers had been doing for centuries. But those western powers didn’t have much of a footprint in Asia. And they wanted to extend their exploitations there. But Japan objected, saying that the west had their own victims to rob, thus keep your hands off of ours. That didn’t go over well with the west. The Japanese could read in US papers such as the NY Times about how vulnerable Japan was to bombing attacks with their wooden structures that were like tinder. How the US was moving military forces to its west coast. How FDR sent a naval frigate to where Japan was doing naval maneuvers in the Pacific ocean to induce an ‘incident’. Japan knew where they could best exercise their aggression and it wasn’t in the Americans. But they damn well were not going to be passive about obvious threats. Threats openly expressed. Cause and Effect.

Appropriate procedures through appropriate channels tend to lose its legal grip
by threats and aggression. The American-British ‘regime-change’ in 1953. It may be SOP in the US foreign playbook but both countries would call such actions against them as an act of war. The threats and actual attacks by the US and certain useful ‘allies’, with the latest being the murder of Qasem Soleimani to further the tensions to the point that increased military actions are inevitable. This is all transparent to the world thus the propaganda get directed, as is always the case, to the one source that the aggressors must convince. Their own population. And how will ‘corporate speak’ react. And all the ‘mayor Pete’s’ in our fair land.

1 Like

Not only have the UN been a complete wash out at controlling rogue states like the US, the US is the country which twists all matters out of proportion in the Security Council by constantly vetoing any and all propositions that would help bring more peaceful solutions. That one veto is all it takes to override every other country on this globe.

1 Like

Older missile design. Some one placed the red dot target light on the pavement.
The damage photo flashed across the TV screen a few hours ago.

We had guys inside Baghdad with laser pointers that targeted for our incoming missiles during desert storm. We missed Sadam about 30 times!! Too many look alikes.

Some airports have problem of laser pointers aimed at pilots eyes upon landings.

This is a silly article, at best. Of course Iran had the right to respond. There was no evidence the U.S. was about to cease hostilities following the murder of Iran’s diplomat (he was travelling under a diplomatic passport). The Iranian retaliation can therefore be seen as a proportionate defense against further attack from the U.S. bases that they struck. Also, let’s not forget that the sanctions the U.S. are still applying against Iran are themselves an act of war, to which Iran has every right to respond.