Home | About | Donate

Italy: "I Say No"


#1

Italy: "I Say No"

Gwynne Dyer

“Today saying No is the most beautiful and glorious form of politics....Whoever doesn’t understand that can go screw themselves.” It could have been Donald Trump before the US election two weeks ago, or Boris Johnson during the Brext campaign in Britain last June, but it was actually Beppe Grillo, founder and leader of Italy’s populist Five Star Movement.


#2

Interesting article and subject, but I think Mr Dyer goes way too easy on Matteo Renzi's constitutional reform plan, which would severely hamstring the democratic process in Italy. Renzi has already taken the Italian workers to the cleaners, in terms of job security and guarantees, with his ridiculously titled "Jobs Act" (which he and the media peddled with those exact American-sounding words), which heavily favors employers and corporations and vastly increases the precarity of the workforce by making even easier to fire people or hire them with no protection whatsoever, with the vague promise that this "flexibility" for employers will create more jobs. Sound familiar? That he would want to lay it on even thicker by reducing popular representation in the government with his constitutional reform is just too much. I hope he loses. Let the chips fall where they may. Beppe Grillo is a lot less appalling than Donald Trump, though if he has to ally himself with the racist Northern League, things could get ugly.


#4

Is this yet another representation of a world-wide dilemma? The "center," "left," "democratic" parties move to the right and curtail democracy, as Renzi is trying to do by restricting democracy in order to make it more "efficient." More "efficient" translates to more controllable. Other so-called center and democratic parties sell out to the financiers and corporations. The only available response to this is for the voting population to move to the extreme right because Renzi IS "the left." What happened to democratic and socialist parties which truly stood for the rights of the ordinary person?