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"It's About the Students!" 50,000 LA Teachers Join Protest, Accusing District of Hoarding Funds Instead of Investing in Schools


#1

"It's About the Students!" 50,000 LA Teachers Join Protest, Accusing District of Hoarding Funds Instead of Investing in Schools

Julia Conley, staff writer

Los Angeles teachers set out to provide a "show of force" on Saturday, with tens of thousands rallying in the city's downtown area to illustrate the power in their numbers, ahead of a potential strike next month.


#2

This, my fellow Americans, is what Democracy looks like.


#3

I see a wonderful display of unity, a strong force. It is about what is right ie education is a civil human right.


#4

“Power to the people, right on.”


#5

A bit of Christmas Cheer for everyone…


#6

Feels almost as good as a shot of brandy.


#7

Seems that the teachers in LA have donned red shirts instead of yellow vests. Hopefully this uprising by the people will spread beyond supporting school children and education to confronting a totally corrupt and captured city government.

Love the courage and steadfastness of these teachers!!


#8

Here’s my last shot of the evening sir…

https://youtu.be/eT1F0AN9-PE


#9

Hmmm…600,000 students / 50,000 teachers = 12 students per teacher. I wonder how accurate that 45 students per class is. Certainly can’t be across the board. Plus, in the corporate world, other than management, who the heck is getting three percent raises per year? Plus, very few corporations currently offer pension plans, other than a 401(k), which, nowadays, is a comparatively risky vehicle… – Give some thought to this, before laying into me. I had 95 students in a university class, with no additional help; so, I’ve some understanding of how bad 45 students per class is, especially if one is teaching more than one class.


#10

Your comment says more about the state of non-union jobs than it does about teachers who have some protection with union membership. My wife works in public schools and she regularly works 60, 70 hour work weeks. And 3%, even if you got that, the cost of living is going up faster than that. Worker productivity has gone continuously up, but wages haven’t tracked productivity since about 1970. My non-union job, with its paltry raises, in terms of purchasing power, I make less now than when I started my job 3 years ago.


#11

Good points all. I worked far too many hours at my non-union university job, trying to do well by my students (which is why I eventually opted for a different career); and, I saw my mom do the same when she taught elementary. I guess it really comes down to the fact that workers need to bring back unionization; and, we, somehow, need to hold the government’s feet to the fire regarding its manipulation (lying) about inflation, which, according to John Williams at shadowstats is running at nine percent, when calculated via the method used by the government in 1980. – But, I’d still like to see a comprehensive class size distribution analysis (plus the raw class size data, sorted by school) for that 600,000 students to 50,000 teachers ratio in LA.


#12

Excellent. Everyone was tight yet playing in their own zip-code. Absorbed.
Love the drummer and want some of what he was enjoying. The bass (probably my favorite sound) was great too, but the camera was on the drummer all the time. Good choice @ 6:45 p.m. here. A wake-up.


#13

In 1970 I was enjoying oj’s and walking on agent orange sand while these concert goers were enjoying max freedom. Wish I could have switched places.


#14

Wish you could have been concert going in 1970 as well.

In 1970, I saw in concert at the University that I was enrolled at:
Grand Funk Railroad
BlackSabbath
Blue Oyster Cult
Black Oak Arkansas
Three Dog Night
and elsewhere,
Led Zeppelin.

Those are the one’s that I can remember.

This musician, Jimi Hendrix, played twice in 1970 in our area, and each time my friends asked me to join them in buying tickets, I declined.

I have kicked myself ever since.


#15

Wow, you were quite the concert goer. All great bands. I’m sure you remember some of the good times you and your friends. I’ll never forget the guy, a friend, sitting next to me at the Grand Funk concert in Seattle, 71.
We were on the upper level and happened to be in a spot where the music bounced off the ceiling and back wall. The numbers being passed through the crowd were cigar size, and a bottle of wine would come by every once in a while, but we already had our bottle of electric wine. Always a little different concoction where ever we partied. My friend was pounding his hands on his knees, to the beat, so hard he couldn’t walk for a while after the concert was over. Thanks for sharing the tune.


#16

Those certainly were the days Gandolf.

I’d roll several beauties before a concert and share some sweet dreams with everyone around.


#17

I have one short reel of John Mayall. It’s got, if I remember, one song on the A side and maybe two on the B side. Play it often when I have the old TEAC up and running. Good stuff.

Must be a pretty unsettling country if there are are protests, strikes, and boycotts everywhere you turn. What we don’t seem to want protest anymore is our 17 years of steady warfare in the middle-east. Have we signed off? Don’t care? Too much else to deal with? It’s scary that so little attention is paid to our foreign entanglements.


#18

Perhaps there is too much contentment in the country. Perhaps everyone is self-medicating.

Appears so as every election, 95% of those who vote, choose the status quo.

It’s very depressing.

I think I’ll go roll up some sweet dreams and watch a little news.

Maybe see Trump put a 45 in his mouth.

Can’t be that lucky.


#19

Ah ha, more self-medicating and contentment. Sounds like us old farts need our rest too.


#20

And, our medication…

Here’s some now.