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'I've Been to the Mountaintop': The Final Speech


#1

'I've Been to the Mountaintop': The Final Speech

Martin Luther King, Jr

The following is the transcribed text of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s final speech, delivered on April 3, 1968 at the Mason Temple in Memphis, Tennessee.


#2

The true eulogy of Dr. King was delivered one year earlier on 04-04-67. Titled, “Beyond Vietnam, A Time to Break Silence” it was a prophetic vision of where the country was headed if the Vietnam war continued as it had been and the past 50 years has shown it to be a true vision. You can either read the transcript or hear the address here:

http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/mlkatimetobreaksilence.htm

This was the unpardonable sin that “the dreamer” committed against the people who manipulated the levers of power in the US and for which he was crucified.


#3

Main stream media won’t touch it. They sanitize his message. He was hated then for making this speech by main stream media.


#4

Such powerful and moving words! They still move me after all these years.

They may have killed his body, but his words are still alive. Still true. Still important.

I love the line quoted above. I had not noticed it before, surrounded as it was by so many
other eloquent statements; But it would, if applied widely, prove to be a much-needed and
beneficial medicine for the sicknesses afflicting America 2018.


#5

And by Main Street America as well, mostly.


#6

While MLK and others provided the salvos needed to push back on the Viet Nam occupation, the critical mass to change public opinion on Viet Nam would not happen until a significant number of “privileged white kids” took to the streets.

Joining privileged white kids in 2018 pushing back on assault guns to muster the critical mass needed to significantly change public opinion has reminded me of the anti Viet Nam occupation activities that I participated in a half century ago.


#7

I’ve reached the point that I can no longer read Dr. Kings speeches or especially hear his words without succumbing to anguish and tears. Those were times or tragedy but also optimism. In those days, I cold not imagine a world in the distant year 2018 that would not be a far more just one. That’s all gone now.