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'Jaw-Dropping' Report Reveals Rampant Wage Theft Among Top US Corporations


#1

'Jaw-Dropping' Report Reveals Rampant Wage Theft Among Top US Corporations

Jessica Corbett, staff writer

A "jaw-dropping" wage theft report out this week reveals that many top U.S. corporations—from Walmart to Bank of America to AT&T—"have fattened their profits by forcing employees to work off the clock or depriving them of required overtime pay," based on a review of hundreds of labor lawsuits.

"While wage theft is pervasive, it is also preventable."
—Adam Shah, Jobs With Justice Education Fund


#2

In the not too distant past “Wild West” if you stole another person’s assets, that person was justified in killing you.

Don’t be surprised if some of these thieving CEO’s start meeting tragic ends.

Deservidly so.


#3

Where I work, most people don’t get paid enough to steal from, but also, few people get annual or any kind of review. Raises are usually in cents. The company throws nickels around like manhole covers, yet seldom allows for any overtime. It’s a “family owned” business, with a non-family general manager who doubles as a “human resources” manager.
He is essentially the enforcer for the family. Sound familiar? He does the “hard work” the owners don’t feel comfy with.


#4

Revisit Zbigniew Brzezinski’s book “The Grand Chessboard”

Link to taped reading of theGrand Chessboard

PDF download of The Grand Chessboard

“America’s withdrawal from the world or because of the sudden emergence of a successful rival – would produce massive international instability. It would prompt global anarchy.” (p. 30)

If and when one chooses to read this slim volume, do so with dedication to looking up the ACTUAL definitions of ‘trigger’ words, such as anarchy. Great media treasure has been expended to normalize, demonize and mythologically elevate interpretations of words like ‘anarchy’. That is to say, its actual meaning is different from its use in media rhetoric, which has become synonymous with ‘threat’.


#5

Surprise, surprise - it’s built into the system. Corporations aside, intentional miss-classification has been happening in Academia in plain sight for a quarter century at least, where the preponderant majority of teaching is done by adjuncts paid multiple times less than full time faculty with the same exact qualifications, and often better.


#6

If these companies had there way we will all be working for slave labor-- It is already on other countries were all U.S. clothing and apparel come from.


#7

it’s called corrupt corporate capitalism. now that you know what will you all do about it???


#8

What do you think of this 1%er who thinks we should raise minimum wage to $15?


#9

Wow, this is an interesting report.

I have a friend who works for one of the large medical insurance call centers, and he has been abused by this sort of corporate action for years. I have encouraged him to report it and take legal action, but he is too timid to do that.

I’m glad some of these crooks have been exposed.


#10

let corporations regulate themselves and what do you get?


#11

I do believe someone pointed about 160 years ago that the very nature of the capitalist mode of production is
“wage theft”, that is the the source of profit, or in his term, “surplus value”.


#12

Union yes!!!


#13

The most American thing that any company can do is make profits and more profits. Some do it by making products that people want and need, some by clever marketing and many by stealing time, money 9and dignity) from their employees. No matter how they do it they are following the American dream (corporate dream, workers are not allowed to dream). Organize a union or accept the status quo.


#14

I’m too embarrassed to mention the highest pay I’ve ever received working in Florida throughout my employed life. To have survived is nothing short of a miracle.


#15

There are skimmers and scammers galore. Even those of us that don’t always ferret out the data, know in their gut that they are being shortchanged on their labor. But this institutional theft that seems to be legal needs people to fight back. Let’s see, in the old days they called that belonging to a union. G


#16

Maybe we should be grateful that the “Company Stores” have gone away. Back then your boss could take what’s left of your pay by overcharging you for rent, food, clothing, and these days, medications as well. G


#17

That seems to be in progress already. We can no longer support our Empire as the corporate interests refuse to pay for their own protective army. When you cut taxes simply because you do not want to pay them you weaken the ability of the nation to support itself and Everyone will feel the lack. The corporate sector is not immune.


#18

This article addresses only the trivial aspect of wage theft, sad to say.

The primary form of “legalized” wage theft (there’s nothing genuinely legal about it) occurs when wealthy corporations bribe Congress and state legislatures to artificially suppress the minimum wage, and to prevent unions from arising.

In the case of the Walmart fortune, where six members of the Walton family are now worth $170 billion, at least $160 billion of that money is the difference between the wage Congress and state legislatures were bribed to set as the hourly minimum wage, and the amount that would constitute a minimally livable hourly wage for Walmart’s workers. In 2016 over 800,000 of Walmart’s ‘sales associates’ were paid an average of $8.81 an hour–a pittance, and in the wealthiest country the world has ever seen.

Thus one of the world’s largest fortunes was gotten through wage theft over decades, with millions upon millions of working Americans suffering for it.

The Walton family fortune isn’t close to the only fortune so stolen, and we need to be aware that this kind of theft comprises the overwhelming majority of wage theft.


#19

Another day older and deeper in debt?


#20

atelios, If i may, the minimum wage should also include a share in the ownership of any corporation’s means of production.

Had the minimum wage kept up with productivity gains for medium-sized and large corporations, we’d also be looking at a $22 an hour minimum wage.

That figure of $22 an hour is also why for-profit prisons are so profitable. In addition to being able to charge taxpayers amounts guaranteeing profits of $30,000 to $40,000 per year for housing a prisoner, a reasonably healthy prisoner through his or her stolen labor will create an additional average profit for the corporation holding the prisoner of $44,000 per year.