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Judge Hands 'Horrifying' Five-Year Prison Sentence to Woman for the Crime of...Voting


#1

Judge Hands 'Horrifying' Five-Year Prison Sentence to Woman for the Crime of...Voting

Julia Conley, staff writer

Highlighting in the most "horrifying" and "insane" manner the way that many states disenfranchise convicted or former felons, a Texas judge is sending a woman to jail for five years for unknowingly casting an illegal vote in the 2016 election when she was on probation.


#2

What ever happened to “letting the punishment fit the crime?”


#3

This sentencing is a direct result of the repug. voter fraud BS. I’m sure Kobach is giggling like a child.


#4

The “punishment” for this “crime” should be obvious: disqualify her provisional ballot and inform her of her voting rights (or lack thereof).


#5

It’s fucking Texas, what else can you say?


#6

In Texas? That’s almost funny. The beatings will intensify until everyone learns where their place is. This poor woman’s place is obviously in a Texas prison for several years.


#7

My mind cannot wrap itself around this! Are you serious? Can any of us stand by while this woman gets swept off to jail for voting?!!! Her appeal needs to be supported by all of us! How can we do it? This is INSANE!


#8

This is just SICK. But then again, this is Texas. This kind of nonsense should never be tolerated in a civil society. Guess that leaves Texas out.


#9

SAY WHAT??! This is the ultimate travesty and puts the lie to all that pledge garbage “land of the free, liberty and justice for all” - it’s all BS as this POS “judge” and FOS laws and so very much more demonstrates beyond all sanity! ENOUGH!


#10

Judge is probably bucking for a federal court position.
What better way to impress the Supreme Leader than to provide a harsh sentence for ‘voting fraud’ by a person of complexion.


#11

I just realized I might have offended children with my comment, for that I apologize.


#12

My take, too. Voting on judgeships allows other elected officials off the hook for their lousy political appts. As bad as patronage since judges are a combination of theorist, teacher and practising atty.


#13

Trump is the biggest Fraud alive and he’s allowed to vote for himself?

And this woman gets 5 years in prison for voting?

This is the most fucked up country on Earth right now and it’s all because of Trump.


#14

Tex-Ass-Istan.


#15

I didn’t know that tax fraud was a felony but I guess it is. If I put myself in this dear woman’s position, probably with no great income and two children to provide motherhood for, this means food and clean, decent clothing and a bed and a roof over their heads, then trying to keep a little more of her income for her family seems understandable. Well anyway, so now she’s finished serving her sentence and then naively, while on probation decides she should vote. A judge decides she must serve five years in prison for this?
What would Jesus say about all this being someone who reminded the Pharisees of these words of God, “I desire mercy, not sacrifice.” Besides this, is this any way to encourage people to vote?


#16

I will volunteer to share jail time if another 1825 people will sign up one day each. This is America? How about “Gulag America”. Is this a sick joke by a sick “judge”? Please tell me this is the case.


#17

You are almost right. This is the most fucked up country on Earth but it isn’t all because of Trump. He is exasperating the problems though.


#18

I wonder how long until they start widening this precedent to conveniently include votes for candidates the ruling elites don’t agree with. I recall the quote from Mark Twain: “If voting made a difference they would have made it illegal”. Looks like they are starting to make it illegal.


#19

That this is a black woman and a Texas judge pretty much explains everything you ever want to know about this story. Surely this will be thrown out on appeal.


#20

It ought to be a crime to to vote when not eligible to do so. There are several reasons for the necessity of preventing, e.g., voting more than once, voting based upon identity theft, voting by non-citizens or those who would otherwise be eligible to vote, or voting by criminals whose probation or parole terms forbid such voting.

As with some other types of laws, at times, the results of prosecutions of certain offenders may seem unfair; however, it is up to the court to weight such matters, and consider the purpose of the law, and the underlying circumstances of the crime itself in handing out justice. Also, bear in mind that, in some types of cases, if the court makes untoward exceptions, then it opens up the door for wannabe offenders to consider breaking such laws with the knowledge that they can use the same defense as was used in a past case (with the same fact pattern) wherein the offender had received a relatively light sentence. After all, the purpose of certain laws is not only to punish but to act as a deterrent to other would-be offenders.

That said, I do believe that, in the case at hand, the punishment might be rather excessive; for, at first glance, the punishment does not appear to fit the crime. I don’t know how much weight was given to the fact that she was on probation when she committed the act of voting and whether such circumstances allowed for increased time. That is to say, versus illegally voting under other circumstances: for example, an immigrant who voted, but, because of its immigration status was not eligible to vote.