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'Justice for Laquan!': Jury Finds Chicago Cop Guilty of Second-Degree Murder for Fatally Shooting Black Teen 16 Times


#1

'Justice for Laquan!': Jury Finds Chicago Cop Guilty of Second-Degree Murder for Fatally Shooting Black Teen 16 Times

Jessica Corbett, staff writer

Activists and residents of Chicago chanted "Justice for Laquan" after a jury on Friday found a white police officer, Jason Van Dyke, guilty of second-degree murder for fatally shooting 17-year-old African-American Laquan McDonald 16 times on the evening of Oct. 20, 2014.


#2

This will go down in history as one of the early and essential victories for sanity in a world hijacked by Citizens United and corporate greed ripping the fabric of society by institutionalized criminality.

Words cannot express my gratitude to the families and all of those who have held the institutional ‘feet to the fire’ on this.


#3

My post was just generally meant, not a response to you theoldgoat. Sorry, pressed the wrong reply.
I agree this was a very important outcome. But just don’t understand how he is not guilty of official misconduct.


#4

There may be a ray of hope…

Chicago has had one of the worst police forces ever (Hell, I remember Daley and the '68 convention… yes, I’m damned old…), and the fact that he was actually convicted, gives one some hope.


#5

Yes, FINALLY FINALLY something JUST happened in a courtroom in this country!! I hope that killer enjoys his time in prison. He stole the life of that young innocent man.


#6

It’s a good conviction, but doesn’t heal us from all those cops that got away with killing mostly unarmed people. We will see if this conviction is followed by others.


#7

I’m just sorry that Rahm F…ing Emanuel didn’t have to pay any price for this, other than not running again for mayor. He has cut funding for help for the poor, closed schools in black neighborhoods, was instrumental in withholding the video, etc, and knew he was going to lose, with Chicago being 1/3 black citizens. What an a**.


#8

Why aren’t the people who tried to hide the video for 13 months on trial?


#9

It’s about time. I remember watching this video countless times, dumbfounded that he was immediately shot and that the shots continued even after he was obviously down and incapacitated. This didn’t have to happen. So sad that his family and friends had to go through such a lengthy process to receive some sense of justice.


#10

And to relive the horror time after time after time.


#11

I am glad to see this verdict but I couldn’t help wondering if this case might not be appealed all the way to the Supreme Court where, as we all know, the ideals and lofty principles of Justice will insure this verdict is upheld.


#12

The Cop that pulled the trigger was a murderer, plain and simple and just looking for any reason to kill another person. These kinds of peoples exist everywhere in a society so what makes it worse when it a cop?

It because the other police officers rally around him and tried to cover this up. At least seven cops were involved in a cover up and likely committed perjury. Had these Police officers DONE THEIR JOBS and arrested this killer form the get go and charged him the Police Force could have retained the respect of the people. Those Police officers that colluded in the coverup of this crime , the Police chiefs that side with them, and the Police Union spokespersons that indicate they going to appeal and get this guy off are all acting to the detriment of law enforcement. It is not a problem with the Public, It a problem with the Police.

I would point out that the Officer that claimed she went into the wrong apartment and shot a black man dead spent LESS time in jail then did people protesting the fact that she was not arrested. The Police investigating that killing got a search warrant to investigate the home of the victim but did NOT get a warrant to investigate the home of the person who pulled the trigger. Again it was an immediate attempt to coverup the crime and rally around “one of their own” and in doing so the Police send the implicit message “we are all like this and would have done the same thing s/he did”.


#13

I avoid interaction with police as much as possible. If I’m at a social gathering and a cop is there on or off duty I leave. If I need to fuel my car and there’s a cop car at the gas station I move on to the next one. Cop car at my favorite dinner? Not stopping there this time. Cop at the post office? I’ll come back later. If I can’t avoid them I’ll be quiet, unobtrusive and as low key as possible. If you believe you need to call the police for any reason be aware that there is good chance that YOU will be arrested or injured or killed by the police. If there is a dog on the premises it will most likely be shot to death as a matter of Standard Operating Procedure. If you cross a police officer, on or off duty there is a good chance evidence of a crime will be planted among your possessions, and you will be arrested and framed. Always lock your car if police officers are anywhere nearby. Avoid them at all costs. Remember, you are guilty unless you can prove your innocence. Police will generally withhold exculpatory evidence if possible. Most of them are corrupt in that even if they are “clean” they protect the dirty ones.


#14

This isn’t over yet. He hasn’t been sentenced, and the judge has latitude in sentencing. He won’t get probation, but he could get the minimum sentence, with all counts to be served concurrently, possibly much less than a total of 10 years, with time off for good behavior. The fact that he was convicted at all is pretty extraordinary in a city known for corrupt racism against it’s African-American population, so don’t be surprised if he continues to get far more sympathy than his victim. The black community has every right to it’s outrage, but until it is converted into effective and ongoing political clout little will change.


#15

Wow, if we didn’t get a conviction of a murder in plain sight, and captured on camera, then we all better get a gun.


#16

Yes it is a victory in the struggle for fair treatment from our security personnel. But I wouldn’t call it justice as the article says. It is never just , and cannot be, when a life is destroyed, or when violence is done.


#17

What will it take?_Revamping police training? Reviewing how we choose our police personnel? How do you police police?

I don’t believe sending police to jail is any more of an answer to social ills than sending other criminals to jail.


#18

Part of the problem is the hierarchy that is in place wherein the Police forces are seen by the state as just a means of keeping the people under control. Just by way of example several years ago a major Police Department announced it was changing the color of the uniforms of their Police to all black. That might seem trivial on the surface but when asked why , those making the decision stated “Because a black uniform is more intimidating”. In other words when you see a Police officer you are not to feel safe , you are to feel intimidated.

That in a nutshell demonstrates how the Police not seen as Public Servants but as “Authority Figures”.


#19

Poor officers. Black is so much hotter. I’ve seen that trend outside the US too. One US export is police equipment.


#20

It’s all part and parcel to the militarization of the police that we’ve seen since the “War on Drugs” (emphasis added). Couple that with surplus equipment (I mean really, does a small NH town really need an armored personnel carrier?) and a bias towards hiring ex-military, and is it any wonder that you have an increasingly “us/them” divide between the police and the population at large?