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Land Taken From Freed Slave’s Descendants for Amazon Data Center?


#1

Land Taken From Freed Slave’s Descendants for Amazon Data Center?

Richard Eskow

This is a story about property: real and imagined, legitimate and illegitimate. It’s a story about who gets to decide who can own what, and whom.

It’s a story of reality, both physical and virtual. It’s a story that begins with humans in chains, moves through Disney’s desire to make a theme park out of our most painful history, and ends with the descendants of slaves dispossessed by a company owned by one of the richest people in the world, a company named for a river.

That river runs through the churning electrical heart of the American internet.


#2

Wasn’t there a case a few years ago where the State of Connecticut attempted to “procure” land using eminent domain laws to facilitate private economic development rather than a public project ?

This Virginia case is an example abusing eminent domain laws AND the continuing failure of gubmit to pursue anti-trust against companies like Amazon that need to be broken up, AND the ongoing dismantling of anti-trust regulations ever since Saint Ron’s revolution and concurrent Democratic Leadership Council (DLC) formation more than three decades ago.


#3

Agree with Richard Eskow 100 % !!

Public utilities - that has a nice ring to it.

We are going to have to nationalize an awful lot of what is now private - dare I say it ?


#4

Bravo, Mr. Eskow! In this one article you have articulated much of what is wrong with 2017 America!

It contains a fundamental fact in one eight-word phrase: “…our stunted political vision and bleak moral landscape.” Stunted and bleak they are indeed!

Your final sentence is the cure for much of what ails our country. Ultimately we must regain and enhance our sense of the nation as a community that puts human values first. Failure to accept this and to do it will spell certain doom.


#5

That was the Kelo case. The Supreme Court - Stevens, Souter, Ginsberg, Kennedy and Breyer - the liberal wing of the Court - all said the state could seize the private property for whatever reason as long as there was ultimately a “public benefit” - even as tenuous as increased tax revenues.

This isn’t “Saint Ron’s” issue. When the case was in the Court, all the protests were from the Right, except for the NAACP and SCLC. All the supporters of eminent domain were governments, planners, or their supporters.

When you give government power, don’t be surprised when it doesn’t use it in your interest.


#6

Wow, gosh I never knew the left was so bad and the right was so good? So why is the right so bad now? I don’t see any right wingers complaining about your Kelo case decision today… And they sure as hell are taking every advantage with it. Otherwise DAPL never would have happened. If your precious right wingers was so bothered by the decision of the Kelo case then why are they using eminent domain as an excuse to grab what they want? There may have been a few protests from the RIght but the Right as a whole clearly was in favor of seizing private property for their bullshit “public benefit” excuses to get rich at the costs of everyone around them. Otherwise, where’s the protests from the Right now? I hear crickets… Your attempts to shame the Left fail!


#7

Big government and big business both love eminent domain. And the states with the worst eminent domain rules (worst defined as those where it is easiest for the government to take people’s property) tend to be “Blue” states - those with the worst ratings are: AR, CA, HI, MA, MS, NJ, NY, OK, and RI. (3 red, 6 blue including most of the large population blue states)


#8

Fascinating and important read concerning ideal property and labor rights, market regulation, and justice. Ideal, not partisan, for the commonwealth.