Home | About | Donate

Learning 'Inside the Blast Zone': Oil Trains Put Millions of Children at Risk


#1


#2

I guess if they can't get these neanderthals to budge when given common sense safety scenarios to consider, they have to up the ante by pointing out that children are at risk. I am not sure a callous businessperson whose sole interest is accumulating wealth regardless of the consequences to others will be swayed by discourse that highlights the risks to junior "others." They just don't care.


#3

The rail danger is not unlike that of exposing children and their families to the poisons emanating (and/or leaking) from toxic waste incinerators that are customarily built adjacent to or within low income (poverty) neighborhoods or in rural areas with small populations...neither of whom have the means or the numbers to combat their construction nor the attendant transportation of those substances to the incinerators.

Like nycat said, "They just don't care."


#4

A natural gas blast took out one square mile of Cleveland in 1944, killing 130 people. But that was before safety was invented, so you don't have to worry now.


#5

More scare to put wings into building pipelines.


#6

In the small city where I live the middle school sits just a few yards from a very heavily traveled freight railroad. I have checked and that rail line does carry petroleum tank cars. There is also at least one elementary school which is about one block from the railroad.

The governor has proposed improved safety measures for all tank car trains in the state. The legislature will not pass anything the governor proposes. I have not heard anything from the railroad but they usually oppose any state regulations claiming they are engaging in interstate commerce. Congress will never approve anything the president wants.


#7

Have studied the issue pretty closely. Live in the Bay Area, which has five refineries.
The risk is extremely high, as outlined here. But we are an extremely exceptional country, thank goodness.


#8

Yep, great points.


#11

I call it seeking authorization based on fear mongering something our propagandists are very good at.


#14

In many cases, these may be robot drone trains with nobody aboard. This saves railroad massive pension plan expenses (the number one unfunded liability for transport companies) and other expenses, and averts the risks of strikes. Computer automation never Unionizes. The MSM used to always include whether or not the engineer who crashed had been over the alcohol or drug limit.

The last several bomb trains, there's been zero mention of this previously hot topic for journos. It's not adding up. One of the Canadian crashes the railroad claimed that the engineer stepped off to make a phone call and the train took off by itself.

Now, just how the hell could that happen? With the new falling asleep protection, an engineer has to constantly step on the accelerator of locomotive engines or the engine goes into idle and the pullman brakes kick in.


#15

Rail is the most efficient and least energy intensive
way of transporting passengers &/or freight from point A to B. Unfortunately expanding rail and enhancing safety are not the top priorities they should be.


#16

Recently, in the small town where I live in Virginia, I pulled off the road to watch an 80 tanker train roll through town within about 500 yards of the high school and athletic field. This was right after a train derailed and several of the tankers exploded in a town only 25 miles away. My only thought was about how vulnerable our school is.