Home | About | Donate

Let’s Stop Sexual Harassment and Violence Before They Begin With Comprehensive Sex Ed


#1

Let’s Stop Sexual Harassment and Violence Before They Begin With Comprehensive Sex Ed

Melissa Goodman

When I was in middle school, I got some very basic sex ed. For one week, a very uncomfortable health/gym teacher taught me about body parts and reproduction, that sex — always heterosexual — can lead to pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, and that we should therefore abstain from sex or use condoms. I was lucky because most people I know didn’t get the condom bit.


#2

I will not disagree with her on this issue, sex ed. is great a thing…but…how to treat each other begins at home. What examples are on display at home? What discussions are being made at home? Character building begins and ends at the parents feet!


#4

Empire requires that all of us wear tunnel vision like some sort of crown - NEVER are the thorns thereon pointed out by those fitting the head locks.

There are only 2 polar opposite genders…Riiiiiight…no wonder there is so much abuse - one of the prime ‘externalizations’ render its adherents glued to permanent failing of coherence. Talk about a cheap trick: the FACT that nature is a spectrum, a continuum suddenly - MAGICALLY - stops at the tunnel of gender confinement under empire. Quick, step in and - for a price (your life) - predators hand over a conceptually addictive band aid.

Every civilization throughout history has realized the reality of and treasure of the full spectrum. Some of our finest societal contributions have been from persons forced to hide their true identities. And WHO BENEFITS???

Answer: the small percentage of thieves, corrupt parasites and predators beating those tunnel vision crowns of thorns into place. Why? the thorn thicket makes an excellent hiding place


#5

Indeed - it begins at home. But then ricochets back out into the larger world through the non-stop graphic violence and abuse that saturates the entertainment media, and surely affects attitudes as much as anything the parents or schools can do. As with the rise of the Orange Golem, what popular culture contains is now on full display. Everywhere.


#6

Why don’t women have the right to choose sex ed?


#7

That is precisely the reason it has to be taught in the schools, like physics, biology (just kidding), history (just kidding), etc.


#8

It is the teachers unions, and honest government such as it be, that have been the targets of Christian extremists who wished to REPLACE science, history, and culture with their creed (ideology).


#9

Sex ed in America begins with corporate media telling little girls and boys from the time they’re teeny how to behave. Little girls are told their job is to be as sexy as they can be for little boys, whose job it is to blow up every perceived enemy in sight to protect our freedom.
The upcoming Superbowl is a prime example of expected gender roles in the form of grown men slamming into each other at great bodily risk, while the super-sexy grown women cheer them on from the sidelines. (Hope none of their obscene nipples pop out unexpectedly! God knows how obscene it would be to unveil the most nourishing, love-giving thing on the planet. JJ’s blunder resulted in a half a million dollars in FCC fines and a decade of scandal.) The week before the Superbowl is also brings the silent scandal as the biggest sex-trafficking time of the year. Billions of dollars are spent glorifying violent, sexist sporting events for weeks before the Super-Duper One, culminating in an overload of testosterone for mass profit and gladiator-style social engineering that rivals none, (except the US war machine).
“Comprehensive Sex Ed” in America also comes in the form of a multi-billion-dollar industry convincing women that no matter how beautiful they are, they’re never beautiful enough. Surface is everything. Substance is secondary. What must little girls think when they see tabloids in every grocery store line shaming overweight stars as if their worth is all in their appearance?
Even if we did teach proper sex ed in schools, girls and women would still be bombarded with sexist, violent BS from cradle to grave. The patriarchy has a LOT to do with that, so until we get rid of the erroneous belief that the male sky God created women to be second class citizens, systematically dominated by men, they’ll continue to be harassed and violated.


#10

So true izzy…improve your mind, murder your television. Control of techie stuff at home is a parents duty.


#11

Yep, parents just breed and don’t teach.


#12

Yes. I don’t really disagree with the need for good and full sex education (what do farm kids know about their animals, at least?).
However, I just groan at not writing about the need to train boys and girls to be colleagues early on. Some of their behavior will separate out via culture and some will separate out via nature. But they can get together in various types of activities and studies and we need to develop them that way - bending the cultural part of their development in ways we wish to see in the future.
If you don’t have the regard for each other as equal colleagues in the first place there is little reason for rote sex ed. It won’t make sense in terms of the regard they already have in their “gut” as a matter of experience.
At young ages a number of sports can be combined before physical strengths and size begin to differentiate how they can cooperate (or compete). Science is available for both brains at more or less similar times. Dance is great for working together in a mutually supportive way. We can figure more, but just hoping that sex ed classes will fix the gaps in how we view each other and ourselves is too limited.


#13

The culture in the school in which I grew up in Oklahoma (of all places) in the early to mid-1950s was not that different from what you describe, and my parents, especially my mother, fostered that sort of outlook. They were outliers to some extent, and certainly the boys and girls developed somewhat different gender roles early on. But I think it’s fair to say that the emphasis on hyper-individualism in the decades since then, and the emphasis on technical training as opposed to general education (“arts and sciences”), coupled with the rise of Christian extremism (the “religious right”) have thoroughly dismantled that kind of education from pre-K through fifth grade in most parts of this country.


#14

I like, economagic, grew up at a different time which had a different mindset. I also had the advantage of being raised by a single parent, my Mother, who demanded equality and not just of gender. The collapse of the family unit began in the 70’s when people stopped breaking bread with each other at dinner-time. As a kid we all sat down at the dinner table and ate together every night or you didn’t eat. Family life ruled, that is no longer the case and it’s a damn shame.


#15

My family ate dinner at the table too, and I agree that “breaking bread together” has been central to human society for some ten thousand years, religious connotations aside. Probably not unique to my experience was the fact that my father was a TV addict, having switched from radio to the hard stuff as soon as his GI Bill based career enabled him to afford it. So we ate dinner to the accompaniment of Huntley and Brinkley, effectively offsetting the benefits of eating together. I am now living with my third TV addict, until recently not as hard-core as either of the others. I heard Buckminster Fuller say in about 1979 that the preceding year had been the first in which Americans ate more meals outside the home than in. That and TV are but two of many anti-socializing changes in the basic structure of society that have occurred in just our lifetime. Another was “disposable (insert consumer good of choice).”


#16

Sure parental behavior is a huge factor in their child’s actions. What if they live in a toxic family? What if dad beats the crap out of mom or junior almost daily? What if dad doesn’t respect a woman’s autonomy? Of if the whole system is down the crapper because of divorce or loss of residence? The kiddos need education and lots of it to navigate today’s society and norms. It’d be great if every family was like “Leave it to Beaver”'s environment but that’s rarely the case. Let’s educate as much as possible to make overall society better for all.


#17

We usually had dinner and then enjoyed dessert with a good dose of the horrors of the 'Nam as Huntley&Brinkley gave their insights on the war. But yes, we did do dinner together unless my dad had to go to Vegas weekly to get to the atomic test site during the cold war.


#18

Yes, precisely my point in Reply no. 7 above, counting the article itself as no. 1.


#19

Eloquent! And I sure wish I could opt out of sponsored “news” releases.


#20

I missed that one–thanks.


#21

Sadly, what you write about is the norm I fear. I know of such families and their off-spring and what they become.