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Making America Great Again Requires Acting on Scientific Knowledge


#1

Making America Great Again Requires Acting on Scientific Knowledge

Elizabeth Hadly

When I was 15 years old, I learned that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) from sprays such as shaving cream to pesticides could lead to “…the possibility of end to life on earth”. After I read that article, the world seemed smaller and humanity larger.


#2

Doesn’t everyone know that the call to make America great again means basically to make America white again? It is a white nationalist slogan. It shouldn’t be used in the context of scientist. It is what the racists want. It means great for them but not great for non-whites.


#3

The question this author is asking…Why doesn’t our present leadership acknowledge and respond to scientific evidence that human activity is destroying the planet…is one that I have wondered about as well. Why? Big multinational corporations, money, power, all of these will die with the planet! So why do they continue to exhibit ever increasing actions to control the world? Do they really believe that the science is wrong?


#4

The basic tenets of the Science is self-reinforcing. If you have antecedent, behavior, consequence, this article starts with behavior and then provides consequences by the question asked. It also does not provide the antecedent. It is not the best question and that is why the consequence don’t really provide the information that is needed. One in three people will have cancer in their life time. That can be attributed to science as well as the conversion of the goal to make cancer a chronic illness. This is a scientific paradigm not a natural one.

Edited: It doesn’t touch on how we got chlorofluorocarbons to begin with or why anyone thought we needed them in the first place. Or why these studies were not completed before there were billions of them made.


#5

The political and economic forces aside, another problem is that low numbers of young people are taking interest in nature - and those that do rarely go beyond the superficial level of the “scenic overlook” or commercialized “outdoor adventure” (especially those awful “ziplines”).

Since my early boy scout years, I’ve seen changes to the natural environment of the central Appalachians where I live - the extirpation of entire formerly common tree species and with the trees big declines in the species like the native brook trout and hellbender giant salamander - which depended on the deep shade of the now-gone hemlock trees to keep the streams temperatures and oxygen levels in the habitable range.

Introduced pests - along with acid rain/snow and fog are largely to blame, although global warming had a big role to play in allowing the pests to survive winters - particularly true with the wooly adelgid which has wiped out or soon will wipe out the hemlocks below about 41-42 deg.latitude or 4000 ft. elevation.

And I’m only noticing the obvious stuff - not the less charismatic critters - who knows what is happening to them.

But what percentage of USAns, particularly younger ones, can even identify or notice the obvious stuff? What percentage can recognize an eastern hemlock - or even noticed the total extinction of the three species of ash tree over a single season a couple years ago? How many can recognize the call of even, say, a song sparrow?

Recently at a local brewery taproom, this guy (didn’t get his name) who was a long-retired Pirates player was donating one of his Louisville Slugger bats to the brewery. I asked him how are they going to make Louisville Sluggers with the ash trees gone? My question went entirely over his head. He didn’t not even know anything about the wood his bats were made of…


#6

I’m not surprised, most adults can’t identify different species of wood or their best use. Young adults have grown up in the “tech” world, and they were not taught about the science and environment around them. I bet you were taught civics in school, a great deal of importance was put on it when I was in school. Most don’t even know what that is now days. Our beautiful earth will heal its self when were all gone.


#7

fern…are you saying that the (antecedent) reason and/or agenda of those disregarding scientific evidence is on purpose? If not, I am confused by your comment.

How is cancer attributed to science? What do you mean by “the goal to make cancer a chronic illness?” And, what is a scientific paradigm not a natural one?


#8

What I am saying is that this is not a full representation of this issue. Both the origins and the consequence of chlorofluorocarbons is scientific. At what point were findings ignored and by whom.

What are the causes of cancer, what contributes to the increase in incidents of cancer, such as all those items listed as these premises use chemicals known to cause cancer, these treatments increase your risk of cancer. Those are scientific incidents. Recently published methods of treating cancer are not to cure cancer but to make it a disease you can live with. That is considered an improvement and also a chronic disease based on scientific understanding.


#9

Right now science is teaching us that an extinction crisis exists, which is likely to include us soon!


#10

Okay. I see. Thanks. And I agree…no one, especially the big multination corporations is investigating WHERE all this cancer is coming from. Cancer is a lucrative disease for the drug industry.

My dilemma is: Where do all these multinationals and drug execs, etc., plan to live after they have helped destroy the natural world?


#11

Well yes, that is a good question and an urgent reason to change the contingencies to protect the natural world. We have hundreds of years of evolution to rely on that should give us some inherent self knowledge to protect ourselves and our living world.


#12

Outreach - that’s what we have here !

Thanks for that outreach, Elizabeth Hadly, and for the tidy summation in the quote above, and from a professor at Stanford no less - impressive.

What am I thinking?

Well - that millions and millions are busy in ways that are counterproductive - Chomsky’s ‘consumer society’, John Kenneth Galbraith’s ‘affluent society’.

Aware - but not aware in any meaningful way, i.e., actions not only speak louder than words, they are key, far and away more important than prose or poetry.

Lots of hand-wringing, lots of utopian thoughts - but vanishingly rare, the actions that are necessary.

With China and Russia’s leaderships having effectively dismissed term limits, with warlords running many failed states, with theocracies far more prevalent than one would expect in the time of multi-messenger astronomy and Elon Musk and his vision for Mars - who still champions democracy?

Not progressives - for populists are objects of derision.

Pity - there really are none so deaf as those who will not hear, or so blind as those who will not see.

Inequality - suck it up and act for the common good as an individual and as families.

There is nothing but our own prejudices and ‘wants’ preventing us from doing what is necessary.


#13

They know the science is correct.


#14

Project DRAWDOWN

“All of life is comprised of self-organizing systems and the Drawdown EcoChallenge is exactly that—people coming together to share, learn, support, imagine, and innovate for a better world. We are honored to be a part of this significant and brilliant initiative.”


#15

Many of you posters are addressing issues that are most accurately characterized as business and politics co-opting science. Evidence based science isn’t the culprit. Business and political operatives manipulating scientific applications for their own benefit are the culprits. Universities funded by such operatives are some of the worst offenders.

For example, there is nothing inherently wrong with the science of GMOs, while there is everything wrong with business and political operatives eliminating transparency, establishing GMO monopolies and extortion rackets that include toxic applications.

Science is evidence based, while Murka and its political duopoly are faith based. Those of us who insist on connecting dots are regarded as unpatriotic heretics.


#16

I wouldn’t count on it. We’re not likely to leave much as we go and may take everything with us as wars, including nuclear wars increase. Conflicts over refugees and disappearing food, water and power are certain; how much they destroy depends on how much we do to both avoid and prepare for climate catastrophe in the next 7 years.


#17

Here’s someone who makes a lot of sense:

Empire Files: Peter Joseph & Abby Martin on Abolishing Capitalism


#18

Yes - I just watched a few minutes of this video - it does make total sense.

I was a stockbroker for one year - enough of that - I was out of there, but it did give me an inside view, which is what I am sure I was after all along.

Your video explores this in more depth - good - thks for posting it.

If I seem too harsh on the ‘progressive’ movement, it is not because I don’t believe in progress !

But what I have found as a veteran blogger is that ‘we’ seem as misguided as the neo-cons.

Just because you want all good things for all people doesn’t make one progressive - it rather defines you as utopian - having ‘bought in’ like the good consumer of your video - to an attack of advertising - what James Kunstler describes as magical thinking.

I.E., ‘The road to hell is paved with good intentions.’

So I am reading Per Molander’s “The Anatomy of Inequality”, and next Pinker’s “Enlightenment Now” - for the same reasons I became a stockbroker - to walk a mile in someone else’s shoes - a very Zen-like or Buddhist way of doing things.

Seven years climbing full-time, ‘for to see an’ for to admire’, taught me definitively, conclusively, that the spin and advertising of modern society is unbelievably corrupting - up is down and black is white type of thing.

We need to get back to reality.

Science is a form of reality - scientists, for all their human flaws - are at least studying the natural world - like we all did when we were evolving here on Earth for many millions of years.

BUT - if we believe in democracy - then we have responsibilities - and lots of them. Self-education, lifelong, is one of these responsibilities.

And actually opting out of the consumer society is another.

It is much easier to simply ‘assume a virtue, when you have it not’ - which aside from being hypocritical - is entirely ineffective - indeed - corrosive to the very ideas which these utopian ideals apparently espouse.

Wait until all is equal - until the world looks the way one wants it to look - and you will have a long wait.

Do something now - and all will be well.


#19

About a year ago, I was driving home from work, and saw a tree being removed, many large logs (limbs), each about 3.5 ft long were loaded on a trailer. Diameters average around 12". I asked the if I could pick from the logs and they said fine. It was an ash tree.

I loaded all I could by myself, using a pry bar, ramps etc. into my truck.

Painted the ends that very day. Still no checks/cracks in any of the cut ends:grin: Plan to resaw within 6 months, then continue air drying until moisture content hits equilibrium, which will get it in the ideal moisture content range for hardwood in this climate.

It was going to be made into mulch. I am glad I saved what I could, as it gave its life in giving beauty, health and shade to those homeowners/visitors, passers by and the neighborhood. But it can live another life after death.

Everyone should try hugging a tree–you will feel its positive energy–and it will make us smile, a gift that keeps on giving.

I bet trees need hugs too.


#20

ErictheRed, Science is teaching us but trump wants to hide science. Taking scientific facts off the websites of the EPA and other govt. agencies makes it harder for the common man to learn what’s happening. It’s all right there if trump & his minions don’t hide it.