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Meat Tax Crucial, Says Analysis, to Combat Climate Crisis and Global Health Threats

Meat Tax Crucial, Says Analysis, to Combat Climate Crisis and Global Health Threats

Jessica Corbett, staff writer

"Driven by a global consensus around meat's negative contributions to climate change and global health epidemics such as obesity, cancer, and antibiotic resistance," meat may soon be taxed like carbon, sugar, and tobacco

meat

I can see it now. The Beef Council isn’t going to like this!

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But the major consumers of such products are the wealthiest in the nation who, with the blessings of the tantrum tyrant, will pay little to NO other taxes if he has his way. The 99% will bear the burden of more taxes and many will simply not be able to afford any meat.

“Starve the lazy worthless bums so we, the wealthy, do not have to look at them begging/sleeping on the streets or in their cars on our way to the gala. Scoop them up and hide them away somewhere.”

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I can see it now. Soon there will be a crucial tax on oxygen…

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I hope your being fasicious.

I can no longer deny the devastating costs to my health and the health of the climate of a meat & dairy based diet. As someone raised eating all those foods we all love, it was not easy to change my diet. But through education and awareness, I have made the switch. I am a nurse practitioner and I see the medical problems these foods are causing. I recommend watching What the Health on Netflix, Dr. Michael Klaper’s videos and Dr. Melanie Joys Ted talk Carnism. Just keep an open mind, if only for your own health. These foods are so unhealthy and corporations are making a lot of money on keeping us in the dark. Thank you.

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the liberal solution to everything: tax it. then tax it some more. place a higher financial burden on the poor and the rich continue to consume as they please. but now hamburger helper costs twice as much.

if it matters this much, the fair approach is to ration. the poor are constantly getting spanked by these kinds of proposals. cigarette taxes crushed the poor and working class–at least for the ones who couldn’t quit. now meat. then pop tarts.

it would be nice if we could start finding solutions that were less egregiously imperial and classist and start doing things less on the ability to pay and more in terms of decreasing universal availability.

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Tax the hell out of it for all I care. I rarely eat meat, and we’d all be better off eating it rarely as well.

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Most overdetermined result ever: economics, ecology, human health, animal ethics all point to the same conclusion. Go vegan.

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As a practitioner of Yoga for many years, one of the best things I ever did was remove meat from my diet. Almost all corporate food is unhealthy because it is not made for health… but for healthy, profits. Why do you think the big corporate, food companies put preservatives in food? Of course, to preserve their profits!

Just like corporate news rots mentally our brain; corporate food; especially processed meat, physically rots your whole body! And all the proof you need is how unhealthy so many American people are in this country!

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“It is clear that if we don’t do something about the emissions from our food system, we have no chance of limiting climate change.”
Perhaps it is not the food but the “system” that is causing the problems of human and planetary health. Before the invasion of the plow, the Great Plains supported a 100 million large grazing animals, uncounted small herbivores, their predators and scavengers including humans. The carbon rich and moisture laden top soil was 6ft deep and the aquifers were overflowing into year round streams loaded with fish. Now the dead top soil is inches thick the aquifers are almost empty and what year round streams remaining have no non toxic fish.
Instead of taxing meat, perhaps we should remove the subsidies that make the animal feed and therefore the meat, cheap and unhealthy. Most of the corn and soybeans grown on the plains is GMO Roundup ready that is treated with many other chemicals which end up in our food and environment and our bodies. Plowing and chemical application destroys the natural biome of the soil and releases huge amounts of carbon. In top of that the animals are treated with hormones, antibiotics and other chemicals which also end up in our body and their poop.
As a nurse practitioner, you will enjoy and learn from Dr. Zach Bush.
http://www.chalenejohnson.com/podcasts/dr-zach-bush-on-metabolism-chronic-health-issues-and-gut-health/
Before the most proficient predator ever to exist (T Rex was an amateur) the grasslands of the world supported billions of ruminants and there was no raise in CO2 and methane levels and much less desert. Allan Savory gives a good Ted talk that discusses this.
To me the solution is not to tax meat but to remove all the tax payer subsidies that make corn and soy cheap and therefore meat cheap.
We can all do our part to reverse global warming by eating organic or biodynamic produce and wine or grow your own and by eating grass fed meat, eggs and dairy.

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I’m sorry, but this is just oh-so typical nonsense from puritanical lotus-sitting liberal old hippie snobs trying to impose their personal values on the rest of us. What’s next - a punitive tax on beer to subsidize pot-smoking? The carbon footprint from meat production is not inherent in raising meat itself - it is from the farming methods and transportation that is currently used for that meat production. Meat can be produced sustainably provided it is eaten in moderation as part of a balanced diet. Humans are omnivores who have eaten meat for more than a million years.

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They raise taxes because the industry will never give up their tax loopholes and subsidies, they will have to be pried from their cold dead hands.

yes. This is another third rail issue. This would backfire in so many ways Progressives shouldn’t even be discussing it lest word get out. Can you say “prohibition”? Let it be instead a massive public education/awakening/shaming campaign. Voluntary Meatless Mondays, then Wednesdays, then Fridays too. And maybe some subsidies to bring down the cost of healthy alternatives…

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Yes!

Not just the carbon footprint, but detrimental effects in general (factory farming comes to mind), and not just meat but food in general. Remember a few years ago when nobody had heard of gluten? Now being gluten intolerant is all the rage. One only has to go back a hundred years to discover a world where all grains were organic and all breads were an artisan sourdough. Could be modern methods are the real problem.

As a culture we do eat far too much meat, it’s true. But as you said above and as countless others have pointed out, ‘moderation is the key.’ Meat itself isn’t an inherent evil. Indeed, bone broth is a premier super food.

One thing I can’t handle, even in moderation, is supposed progressives calling for more taxes on basic commodities.

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Thank you so much for this antisandman.
I agree with all you say and you said it beautifully. I am going to these links now.

I really try not to antagonize people because food is such an emotional topic, almost as much as the tax system! I just see all the heart disease, cancer, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, obesity (along with destroyed knee joints/surgeries), the pills people have to take everyday to survive, and it breaks my heart. If those people were on a plant based diet they would not be suffering day in and day out. I know this is the truth.

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I wish we could tax the creation of more humans.

I mean, damn, isn’t 7.5 billion enough?

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You don’t need to eat meat.

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How about we tax meat 30%, just like the initial retail tax on recreational bud in Colorado? (since marijuana is such a danger to life and planet–just like pork, beef, chicken)

I prefer the simplest tax schemes that solve the problem. So to the extent that meat production’s GHG impact can ultimately be traced back to a carbon fuel input - I agree with you that we should tax the carbon fuel and stop there (that is the whole point of a carbon tax - to make all products reflect the externalities of carbon use).

However, my understanding is that there is a significant factor that would not be tracked through the carbon tax which is the extra methane production. I’m not as well versed in the numbers, so if someone starts going on about how many buffalo before Columbus …, I don’t have the answers. But at this point if we can reduce our methane output (leaking fracking wells or cow farts) we should want to do it (because even though methane breaks down into CO2 + H20 in the atmosphere, it still takes a while and in the meantime it is a more powerful GHG than CO2.) I agree that this tax idea isn’t going anywhere in the US in the foreseeable future (we’ll get Medicare for All first, maybe a general carbon tax and these won’t happen in the current administration obviously - a good reason to vote these bums out).

I’ve been mostly vegan for the last 20 years, vegetarian for 35+. I’m not that persuaded about the human health arguments (anti-cancer, etc.) though I don’t think it hurts (the protein deficiency garbage was a big distraction). I made my choice only on ecosystem health and world wide food availability (the Diet for a Small Planet argument).

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