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Medicare For All Can Reshape the ‘Art of the Possible’


#1

Medicare For All Can Reshape the ‘Art of the Possible’

Richard Eskow

Bernie Sanders unveiled his Medicare for All bill this week, and 16 Democratic senators signed on as cosponsors. The last time he introduced a bill like it, not one senator was willing to join him. They considered the idea impossible, utopian.

Times have changed.


#2

Funny how our ruling party wants medicare for none
Really funny you don’t even notice … but then, humans often seem to function better when they’re clueless …


#3

“The goal must be to take over Congress, not surrender to a hostile one, so that the “possible” is redefined. This bill can help make that happen.”

Well put. And that means helping Republicans understand that this should be a litmus test for their Congressional candidates as well. That is not as far-fetched as it may sound. It is in everyone’s interest. And people can be made to see that.


#4

Lying Donnie says Single Payer will bankrupt the country.

Will somebody Please tell the senile sissy in the White House, he’s already doing a bang-up job at accomplishing that task single handedly.


#5

What Obama called “our unique American health care system” when he was promoting the ACA in 2009 is ALREADY bankrupting the country.


#8

Thank you, Mr. Eskow, for a clear-eyed, optimistic, and realistic analysis of this very important development.


#9

Bernie very cleverly used this term “Medicare for All” during his campaign. It conveys very well the meaning of his proposal.

But in reality, healthcare by right for the “lower classes” exists outside of medicare too. As if you are a congress person, you have a right to publicly funded healthcare, same if you are a federal employee, same if you are in the military, same (in principle) if you are in prison, same if you are a destitute (but with children), same if you are a poor child, same if you are over 65. What we have is a nightmare of course (and public funds go to private hands), but as far as the principle of right to health goes, many categories have it - so it is hard to find the reason why the rest of us commoners shouldn’t.


#10

I watched the video and he seemed to be saying exactly the opposite about single payer systems. His emphasis was on “unless you change the funding system…” because he was asking about how the Canadian single payer system provided so much better of a cost profile. In particular, that video was prior to the time when the federal government substantively negotiated Hospital and Doctors charges - so the rate schedule just followed the private market and was unsustainable.


#11

Medical care is like Niagara Falls. It’s a beautiful thing if you run it right.

Niagara Falls run by private companies circa 1900:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c4/Harnessing_the_Niagara_River's_power_in_Niagara_Falls,_New_York,_c._1901.jpg

Niagara Falls run by government circa 2000:


#12

All, I repeat, ALL the other civilized wealthy democratic countries have some form or version of universal health care EXCEPT the US. In those other countries, everyone is covered, no one goes bankrupt from medical costs and the drugs cost a fraction of what they do in the US. It’s 2017 and we still do not have true universal health care!!! WTF! When is enough enough? Yes, taxes will go up to pay for single payer BUT you will not go bankrupt from medical costs, the drugs will be cheaper, there will be no or much lower co-pays and there will not be high deductible crappy insurance plans. Why don’t we adopt the systems in Germany, Holland or Switzerland? I am not optimistic. Maybe in 600 years we will have true single payer or Medicare for all? 1,000 years?