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Michigan Flood, Says Group, Shows US Unprepared for 'Nightmarish' Threat of Nuclear Disaster Combined With Pandemic

Mine too - in nuclear war, like love, luck favors those that strike first; especially if you can do it before your opponent acquires more weapons. The fly in that ointment is Russia, which still has enough nukes, even if many are dated, to do considerable damage to the US. Of course we ‘stir the pot’ in other nations, just as Russia and China do over here - yet we act surprised when they do. IMHO, when (not if) China invades Taiwan, that’s where the war will start.

OBTW, my research indicates Uraguay as an alternative, Equador trending toward economic instability due to the oil price crash and of course Covid. Economic instability often leads to political instability.

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How much uranium do you think is stored in a fuel rod?

About 140 fuel pellets per rod, with around 120 rods per fuel assembly, 250-300 assemblies in a working reactor.

And how much is in a fuel pellet?

Don’t forget some water and food rations.

An ‘unused’ fuel pellet weighs only about an ounce with most of it being non-fissionable U-238 and about 3-4% being fissionable U-235. Un-used fuel pellets are essentially non-radioactive. After a few cycles of use, while the weight remains the same, the elemental makeup now consists of various long-lived fission products such as Plutonium-239 and a host of short-lived elements such as Iodine -131. After a bout 5 years most of the short lived products decay to stable elements, but the longer lived stuff must be stored and protected - can’t have that Plutonium in the wrong hands.

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Exactly. It can be 30 c outside but weather stations say it’s only 26 or something.

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Good point! I hadn’t considered Uruguay, but I like the sound of Panama because it is on the US dollar, for however long that currency remains viable, and Portugal, along with Costa Rica and Thailand. Anyway, I have grandchildren here in the US, so leaving is probably a pipe dream. However, if they cut my SS, I may have no alternative but to leave.

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My question to @PaulK was intended to be leading. Even at conservative estimates you’re looking at over 5,000 KG of uranium fuel in a nuclear reactor.

Historically we have used as little as 57KG of HEU with 85% enrichment in a nuclear bomb.

So my immediate question is, how does a reactor with nearly 4 times the fuel of a nuclear bomb experience an uncontrolled criticality event and not level the entire city?

Additionally the explosions occurred days after the initial meltdown event. Fission reactions aren’t really known for having delayed fuses, so how did this delay occur?

I keep trying to look for any scientific evidence of the criticality event that PaulK is referring to, but perhaps he or yourself can show me. My understanding from pretty much every site, has always been that there was a hydrogen explosion at the plant due to the release of built up gases in the reactor containment. When the gases were released the venting lines were damaged in the earthquake and tsunami and thus hydrogen escaped into the secondary containment area where it experienced a reaction with oxygen in the air and exploded.

Critically requires not only fuel but a ‘critical configuration’. During a loss of cooling accident the fuel tubes are destroyed fairly quickly allowing the pellets to drop into a pile at the bottom of the vessel. A ‘critical configuration’ no longer exists and the reaction shuts down. Decay heat may still exit (in significant quantities) to melt through the bottom of the vessel (and release significant contamination) if cooling not restored. Explosions at damaged reactors are usually steam explosions caused by overheating of cooling water, or hydrogen explosions resulting from oxidation of reactor components and disassociation of water molecules occurring when subjected to intense radiation.

I’ve seen an Australian documentary on the same subject. It was horrific. Minitrue has first hand experience of this abomonation.

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Make sure you are certain of the residence requirements. In europe you have to have half a million euros before a residence is granted to anyone outside the EU.

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The Dow Chemical reactor is a TRIGA pool reactor, commonly used for education and research. There are dozens of these in use at universities because they are so safe. The Dow reactor is used to generate neutrons for materials testing and their radiochemistry program. It is licensed for operation to 300 kw peak, and TRIGA reactors have been demonstrated to be capable of safe pulse peaks of up to 22,000,000 kw.

Being a pool-type reactor, the main threat that a flood would pose would be that it might wash dirty water into the clean reactor pool water. This would be an inconvenience and would require cleaning, but it poses no threat of losing control of the self-regulating fuel. The main threat to the public from the flooding of the Dow facility is from chemical contaminants. Not from their research reactor.

If you can buy insurance to compensate for injury or environmental damage I would like to know who provides the policies?

Credible accidents for TRIGA and TRIGA-fueled reactors were evaluated in the light of contemporary knowledge and the long operating history of this class of reactors. Seven categories of accidents were analyzed:
" excess reactivity insertions
" metal-water reactions " lost, misplaced, or inadvertent experiment
" mechanical rearrangement of the core
" loss-of-coolant accident " changes in fuel morphology and ZrH x composition
• fuel handling.

You appear to be referring to Fukushima. Those were version 3 BWR reactors with Mark I containment.

"they melt down inside. Then in the meltdown, way too much uranium congregates in one spot and an uncontrolled fission reaction takes place. Then everything vaporizes inside. Then the top of the reactor pops off and a rather miniature mushroom cloud takes all of that vaporized radioactive metal straight up.

That did not happen. The reactor vessels failed by the fuel melting out the bottoms. The tops of the containment vessels all remained intact and in place. The mushroom cloud was from a hydrogen explosion outside the reactor and containment vessels.

“Then the government makes all reporting about the casualties a state secret punishable by jail.”

So secret that nobody has been able to find the law that says that, nor an example of anyone who has been prosecuted for reporting about casualties, or Fukushima in general.

“Then the radioactive cesium in the ocean drifts toward other countries and gets taken up in the food chain.”

At levels that are insignificant compared to natural sources of radiation in the ocean food chain.

And their conclusion was that the only credible accident that might produce significant offsite doses involves a fuel element that sustains major damage during a fuel-handling accident. That is not a reactor operation or loss of control hazard. That is a materials-handling hazard. Same would apply to the handling medical radio-isotopes, but is Beyond Nuclear calling for the shutting down of all radiotherapy programs?

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~https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/are-babies-dying-in-the-pacific-northwest-due-to-fukushima-a-look-at-the-numbers/

Quote: “Only by explicitly excluding data from January and February were Sherman and Mangano able to froth up their specious statistical scaremongering.”

“Mechanical rearrangement of the core might result from extraordinary natural phenomena such as an earthquake or similar large forces. Even if this resulted in a criticality excursion in combination with a major loss-of coolant, the activity released would not be sufficient to present an offsite
hazard.”

~ttps://www.nrc.gov/docs/ML0836/ML083660125.pdf

It is probably to cheap to meter too.

I suppose it makes some sense that we would nuke someone. Probably because we have NOT been able to win a conventional one since ww2. And God knows we keep trying, or at least pretending to try.

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My Sister lived in Costa Rica for awhile, and liked it a lot but she likes New Zealand a lot better. She tells me Panama is a hell hole. I do not know anyone that has moved to Ecuador; however, I have lived and worked all over Mexico and you can live like a king there on one of there beautiful beaches on your SS if you know where to go.

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