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"Nature Won't Wait": Break Free 2016 Begins with UK Coal Mine Occupation


#1


#2

Wael Hmaidan is correct: "We need more action, and faster."

Blessings to all fighters for Earth, Ecology, Existence.

Find people in your community, and get involved in organizing direct action. Very seriously: What have you got to lose?


#4

In US our best hope might be to try to get Congress to agree to an emissions tax on greenhouse gases as CO2 equivalent with a carbon tax as a down payment and revenue divided among: buying fossil fuel as reserves to keep it in the ground, retraining workers for jobs with renewable energy, adaptation to climate change (including desalination of seawater), mitigation of climate change (mostly capture of CO2 from ambient air), subsidizing equipment to harness renewable energy and to store energy to better match supply and demand over time of day and time of year, and covering the cost of using weather/earth-observation satellites to monitor emissions. It will be necessary to give our ten too big to fail oil/gas firms enough of the revenue to make up for prohibitive tariff effect of carbon and emissions taxes in order to get it through Congress. Too big to fail firms by definition have plenty of political clout to demand that the much needed replacement of fossil fuel with renewable energy is done at the expense of consumers, rank and file workers, and small business leaving to big to fail businesses at least as well off as with business as usual. It is bad that American politics is so corrupt, but that is the way it is..


#5

And here is me thinking that that arch-enmvironmentalist, Maggie Thatcher, had already shut down all the UK's coal mines long ago.............


#8

The major implication of too big to fail is that it is impossible to put them out of business. They will destroy any group that attempts to destroy them. Thus, the only way to stop burning fossil fuel is to buy fossil fuel as mineral rights at ready to burn prices from our ten too big to fail oil/gas firms. I do NOT know how Pres. Obama managed to put King Coal out of business--I congratulate him. Fortunately, all they want is money-- so it should be possible to buy them out over the 300 years their remaining reserves can be expected to last with business as usual. They are all publicly traded stock corporations, with published P&Ls. They are ruling class, and the ruling class always gets theirs first, ahead of the 99%. Also fortunately, the whole energy industry is only 9% of GDP. Also demand for energy is even more inelastic than demand for tobacco products. It will take a few years to phase in a high enough tax on first emissions, later energy regardless of carbon footprint to buy enough fossil fuel as mineral rights to replace the current income of those ten too big to fail fossil fuel firms.


#10

Well, let's name a few.
* No gas at the corner gas station.
* No natural gas for your kitchen stove, or your central-heating-unit.
* Very likely brownouts and blackouts of electric service, possibly no electric service at all.
-- The sort of life that socialist paradises like Cuba and Venezuela have or are already experiencing.


#11

As opposed to the fundamental basis for a living planet. Who could possibly opt for a living planet?


#12

To amplify on what Carol wrote about "locally produced", how about locally produced people powered politics, and undo the 'not-so-perfect union' that binds us to Washington DC?
-- Think what Burlington VT could accomplish if they didn't have to spend time dickering with Houston TX before deciding and implementing policy...?


#13

For you! A copy of the book 'The World Without Us'.
(According to some, that is what will best ensure a living planet...)


#14

Your world will end up "without us" far more certainly and far more swiftly than my world.


#16

My study of the evidence tells me that left-wing programs are more likely to result in mass-death, a la China's 'Great Leap Forward', than what we are currently doing.
-- I do subscribe to James Kunstler's 'Peak Oil' notions, and what we are seeing right now looks like one of the swings that destroys oil-industry infrastructure that he has described in his predictions. But the others swings, a recovering economy that drives oil prices up to $100/barrel, followed by recession -: I am not seeing that. ...