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NC Voter ID Law 'Intentionally Discriminatory,' Rules Appeals Court


#1

NC Voter ID Law 'Intentionally Discriminatory,' Rules Appeals Court

Nika Knight, staff writer

A federal appeals court on Friday struck down North Carolina's controversial voter ID law, ruling that the 2013 law was created "with discriminatory intent."

Civil rights groups hailed the decision as a major victory.


#2

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#3

I am about finished with Jane Mayer's Dark Money, which I highly recommend. According to her, NC has been Koched with all burners on max (OK, my words, not hers).


#4

Disenfranchisement of minority voters is heinous and the courts (all levels) have to keep these states in line. This is GOOD NEWS!


#5

Let's not forget that NC legislature passed this discrimination-laden bill within days of the Supreme Court gutting the Voting Rights Act.

This is why we need regulations and laws for protection of equal rights for ALL people.


#6

In other news, rain was ruled to be wet...


#8

I, too am reading Dark Money...very well written, engrossing, and the info is enraging! The Koch Bros. pandemic began with their John Birch father and they have ratcheted up the rancor and injection of lucre 100-fold...canvassing all levels of governance nationwide and they have capitalized on Citizens United with a furor.


#10

Um aren't cha kinda fergettin that silly Supreme Court rulin back aways there?


#11

Yet people still vote for criminals and scoundrels like Hillary Clinton and Donald Drumpf.


#13

A few years back I tried to explain the voter ID issue to some friends in Slovakia. They were astonished that in some areas of the US one doesn't have to show any form of ID to vote. They were uneasy with the idea that one could simply show up, state their name and cast a ballot.

While the intent of this law (and many like it) may be minority disenfranchisement I think, overall, having to show a valid photo ID to cast a ballot is a sound idea.


#14

UUuge!


#15

Thats fabulous! I had a similar response - The garden song...


#16

Funny thing is, voter ID fixes a problem that never existed. The voters are not the problem. Election fraud is though.


#20

It is possible, perhaps. that in Slovakia, it is required that all citizens must carry state-issued IDs, possibly at all times. In that case, the objections, that exist here where citizens are 'free' to not have such an ID card and where there are requirements that make getting one burdensome, would not exist.


#22

And let's not forget the Dutch's gift to South Africa - Afrikaners.


#23

Attorney General Kennedy is going to hand them their heads on a plate. This isn't the 50's anymore. These are modern times.


#24

In the case of voting, or the case of doing banking functions, or acquiring concert tickets, the legitimacy of those transactions is not based on 'identification' but on the 'validity' of those transactions. You registered with Common Dreams and provided a username and a password. By using your password with your username, you have provided 'validity' to Common Dreams. But no identification. (A 'username' is described in the world of computing as a 'text identifier'. That's merely an example of a naming convention. It could have been called with equal legitimacy a 'textual aileron-defroster'). Additionally, voting, unlike making transactions at a bank or making purchases, does not involve the exchanging of property and/or money or its representation. You can gue$$ which kind of validating is considered more important.

The plastic card with one's picture embedded in it is a relatively recent method of displaying personal information. And despite it's moniker, it's also not an identification but a type of validation. Prior to plastic 'ID' cards, means used for validation were: associations, descriptions, comparisons to recorded information and other such connections that gave credence to the validations. Those are the same methods used now with contemporary technology. Historically, one's name and address in a voting log book along with their signature or a marking when a person votes has been such a validation in the past for the US and worldwide seemingly forever.

When 'driver license cards' or 'state identification cards' are deemed as a necessary validation for voting, the state is morally bound to facilitate getting those cards to the public. That's a responsibility of the state. It's also a responsibility of the state to avoid doing anything that is 'Intentionally Discriminatory' to those participating in their constitutional right to vote. And THAT holds forever.
Capisce?


#25

Voting is a right. Going to a concert is not.


#26

Scoundrel if you like, but in this country you still have to be convicted before a criminal.


#27

Thank you for explaining that.

Of course some stealth internet personalities would have you believe the nation is under attack by some massive voter fraud effort. This meme was crafted specifically to justify disenfranchising minorities.

This is another of the big lies frequently heard on Fox "News". Many Republicans still claim illegal alien voters is the only reason Obama was elected.