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Nestlé Wants to Steal More Michigan Water as Flint Still Forced to Rely on Bottles


#1

Nestlé Wants to Steal More Michigan Water as Flint Still Forced to Rely on Bottles

Lauren McCauley, staff writer

The state of Michigan has reportedly issued preliminary approval for bottled water behemoth Nestlé to nearly triple the amount of groundwater it will pump, to be bottled and sold at its Ice Mountain plant, which lies roughly 120 miles northwest of the beleaguered community of Flint.


#2

Another clear example of how "private property" leads to the loss of freedom.

The indigenous peoples of bolivia recognized this when water was about to be privatized.

What they could once get for free by dipping a bucket in the river when that water was part of the commons , would be something they had to pay money for were it privatized,

Nestlé makes it profits by theft.


#3

Nestle has a long history in Africa--pushing baby formula in places where there was no clean water. Telling the mothers it was better for the kids than breast milk. Hundreds, maybe thousands of babies died from diarrhea from contaminated water, but Swiss giant Nestle made millions.


#4

Privatization; making a public service as expensive as possible.


#5

Breaking news! Due to a lack of regulatory restraint on lower atmospheric advertising, Nestle is launching a square mile lighter than air billboard promoting their many wonderful products. Initially, it will hover over Detroit. It would, of course, block out the sun; but for a small annual fee it will be relocated to Flint.


#7

3 questions:
Does anyone know why this corporate abuse of a natural (public) resource is being allowed?
Why is the State of Michigan allowed to put corporate interests ahead of the public's?
How can this be corrected/addressed?


#8

Ya know, how about ole Govy Rick Snyder gets a pipeline built, real pronto, to move that nice, clean, clear marketable water on down to Flint, and stop selling it to the folks there who can't drink the stuff coming out of their faucets?!


#9

When corporations privatize public goods and services, two things are guaranteed to happen: the quality will decrease, and the price will increase.


#10

I see... first the corporations pollute our water then, they steal our unpolluted ground water so they can sell it to us because we can't live without water. Time we placed a monkey wrench in the machine: total, non cooperations.


#12

I'm going to order my air and sunlight early this year for the holidays. I already pay $7,000 a year for the ground that I own.


#13

This is appalling. A big punch in the gut of all in Michigan that are suffering from lack of or paying for poisoned water. Are they trying to start a revolt? How long do they think people are going to just lay down and take it? I am incensed and can only imagine how Michiganders are feeling. Like fighting I hope. This is just too much, they can't fucking have it all, as Bernie so aptly put it.


#14

All brought to you by your corporate overlords. You will be seeing more from them as they assemble around your new Queen Clinton.


#16

Questions for Snyder and his pals in the state houses. Obviously, they care far more for money than for the lives of the people of Flint and the state of Michigan. Selling water rights that are part of the public domain should be outlawed nationwide. In Oregon and Washington, Nestle has tried and failed with their attempts to usurp the water rights of small towns by approaching local mayors and city councils to make deals and empty promises. When word got out, the citizens came together and STOPPED the madness dead in its tracks. One mayor was given the boot as a result. Citizens being vigilant and watching closely the actions/operations of local and state officials and agencies is the key to stopping bloodsuking ghouls like Nestle from privatizing what by all rights, belongs to the Commons! Hopefully, residents of Michigan and Flint in particular come together SOON!


#17

Nestle' has the very same sweetheart deal in California and in British Columbia. I've tried to engage Jerry Brown and my House rep in order that this absurd and unfair program be halted. So far, no interest - business as usual (and both are Democrats [long ago gave up on Feinstein]).

If we ever experience rolling "dryouts" (if drought becomes exceptionally severe), so water is not available 24/7, I predict that the politicians will tell us: "Don't worry, there's plenty of water for sale at the store. See all of those cases and rows of Arrowhead (owned by Nestle')? And you thought there was no water, silly you."


#18

My sense is that conceptually and as a practical matter, the corporation is more powerful than the public. If we do not amend or remove the corporation, it will continue to run roughshod over the public.


#19

#21

So who has the right to give Nestle' the rights to water they don't own? The local governments can deal all they want but the bottomline is the water table belongs to everyone collectively. Again, you can't sell or deal with that which you don't own. That means every deal the local or state governments make with Nestle' are null and void from the start. Private property owners have the right to drill on their own property. Fine, but the water table doesn't stop at their property lines so they are stealing a public resource. Sounds like a really solid lawsuit to me!!!


#22

On another note, it looks like there is/has been a fair amount of fracking activity in the area. I'm sure the groundwater in the area is completely unaffected though.


#23

Change.org does provide a platform for public affirmative action, by way of initiating and promoting petitions.

Anyone with knowledge on where to direct such action is encouraged to pursue this. We the people do have a voice, and this is one way to use it.

Please, anyone who can guide or direct such a cry for action, log on and start it rolling. I will be proud to add my name.


#24

Ah Nestle. The company that promoted the sale of bottled-milk feeding to African women perfectly capable of breast-feeding.

Boycott, anyone?