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New Analysis Shows Federal Marijuana Legalization Could Raise $130 Billion, Add 1 Million Jobs by 2025


#1

New Analysis Shows Federal Marijuana Legalization Could Raise $130 Billion, Add 1 Million Jobs by 2025

Jon Queally, staff writer

In addition to putting dent in failed 'War on Drugs,' legalization could put hundreds of thousands of people to work and generate billions in revenue


#2

But that money wouldn’t be flowing into the corporate drug and alcohol corporations and that is simply not okay in the USA. To say nothing of the private prison industry. And its never really about jobs in the USA, its about the corporations bottom lines and they make much more money by outsourcing jobs nowadays.


#3

There have been indications that Trump wants to over extend federal authority over states such as California that have legalized marijuana. The feds under Trump have wanted to regard marijuana in the same category as Heroin. I am for legalization but I am also in favor of having a breathalyzer test for marijuana developed to establish standards for driving vehicles while under the influence. It is definitely not in the same category as Heroin but precautions are needed.


#4
legalization could put hundreds of thousands of people to work and generate billions in revenue

folks,we’re talking about a weed, here! not everything should be about growing the economy!
ugh! capitalism! :roll_eyes:


#5

There are a lot of excellent reasons to legalize cannabis, from filling gov’t coffers to emptying prisons; but to me, the virtually limitless uses of industrial hemp constitute the really big prize.

It was largely due to hemp’s threat to DuPont’s profits that “marijuana” was demonized and driven underground. Now that public opinion on pot consumption has undergone a sea change, there’s no longer any credible basis on which to prohibit the rise of industrial hemp agriculture, which is widely accepted outside the US.


#6

…plus, if Hemp was used to replace wood and plastic for paper products and as a replacement for plastic bottles, those numbers would most likely double or triple.


#7

A large percentage increase in industry and jobs would be generated by vast increase of products from Industrial Hemp (IH) - 1001 uses - products, foodstuffs, oils, paper, cloth, a safe non-petroleum plastic, etc, etc, etc - the increase in economic activity and jobs would be enormous!

Legalize It! End The Prohibition! Save the Planet!

https://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/ncnu02/v5-284.html - Hemp: A New Crop with New Uses for North America - examies the vast economic benefits and diverse products and jobs that would be associated with decriminalization/legalization of IH and increased economic activity! Please read and spread widely.

http://jackherer.com/emperor-3/ Jack Herer author of “The Emperor Wears No Clothes” a brilliant historical account of why Cannabis and IH are illegal and why/who is responsible!

The conspiracy to make the most diverse in uses and valuable plant on the planet illegal and keep it so since the 1930’s has cost our nation and world trillions in lost productivity and millions of victims of the “War on Drugs” the freedom of their lives!

If there is no absolute right for the people to grow for their own needs (at least) this marvelous plant , there is NO real legalization! Legalization must not be allowed to be corporatized for profits only!


#8

I am astounded that the mental giants at Visa and Mastercard haven’t penciled out the revenue they are losing with pot sales currently an all cash transaction nationwide.
The Banksters should be yanking the leashes of their puppets in Congress to re-schedule pot.


#9

…and, say what you will about Marijuana, it’s usage is an excellent way to maintain your Mental Health.

It’s a Stress Reliever Extraordinaire.


#10

Here is a comprehensive article on the legalization of marijuana world wide:


#11

Thank you E, for I am leery of framing this initiative solely in terms of the economy and taxes. Firmly establishing this right would not significantly put a dent in the expected returns to either of those concerns. Many users have brown thumbs, do not have the patience, or would not forego the convenience of just going to the corner store to get a doobie.

And thanks to the others that have again pointed out the marvelous usefulness of hemp. Does anyone here know how any of the current legislation has addressed the repression of industrialized hemp?


#12

I do believe that cannabis has long been included on the list of Schedule 1 dangerous drugs. This is not something brought about by Trump and his demented minions. What is nucking futs is that cannabis is, and tobacco and alcohol are not.

While it is not impossible to become physically addicted to pot, it is not generally observed; many do acquire a psychological dependency, but also “grow out of” or move beyond that syndrome. The same can not be said of tobacco and alcohol.


#13

My emphasis on Trump are the things said and done in relationship to California, who legalized marijuana. This is the first type case where there will be a debate over federal and state authority. That’s what makes this controversy new and different.


#14

I’ll do an extra bong hit to these wonderful statistics…
It’s way past time to end marijuana prohibition.
Someone needs to kick the Attorney General Keebler Elf in his ass. Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III needs to go down harder than Stephen Bannon.
Free the weed.
Onward through the fog of Fascism.
:herb::v:


#15

Cannabis was placed on Schedule 1 under the Controlled Substances Act of 1970, but its use has been restricted since 1937. Schedule 1 prohibits use because, allegedly,

"Substances in this schedule have no currently accepted medical use in the United States, a lack of accepted safety for use under medical supervision, and a high potential for abuse.

“Some examples of substances listed in Schedule I are: heroin, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), marijuana (cannabis), peyote, methaqualone, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (“Ecstasy”).” (From MedShadow)

Note that these substances vary widely by effective dosages, physiological and psychological effects, and potential for addiction. In other words, it’s a decision based in politics rather than in medicine.


#16

Thinking about this just the other day, perhaps after that second hit, I had a vision of the young elf walking home from school and being accosted and teased by a group of “miscreant stoners” and wondered if maybe that explains his visceral hatred of pot smokers. “Hey little Jeffy! c’mon get loose. Free your mind, and your ass will follow!” (with credit to George Clinton and Funkadelic)


#17

Thanks for that refresher. As someone who’s had the experience, you’d have to be a dedicated masochist to “abuse” peyote more than once or twice.


#18

My brother just gave me, and I just finished reading, the autobiographical works of Richard Feinman, the Nobel Prize winning physicist and all-around gadfly. He talked many times of his desire to try LSD but did not wish to take the chance of damaging his thinking machine. It was only near the very end of the second tome What do YOU care what other people think? that I came across the admission that apparently he was a regular pot smoker.


#19

In California, marijuana was legalized and taxed. Then the tax revenue going to the state became the big reason for the “high” level of acceptance - for even those who were not getting high.


#20

Plus sheeple wouldn’t have to watch all those soap operas they are ADDICTED to.