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No Safe Harbor: How NSA Spying Undermined US Tech and Europeans' Privacy


#1

No Safe Harbor: How NSA Spying Undermined US Tech and Europeans' Privacy

Danny O'Brien

The spread of knowledge about the NSA's surveillance programs has shaken the trust of customers in U.S. Internet companies like Facebook, Google, and Apple: especially non-U.S. customers who have discovered how weak the legal protections over their data is under U.S. law. It should come as no surprise, then, that the European Court of Justice (CJEU) has decided that United States companies can no longer be automatically trusted with the personal data of Europeans.


#2

I forget what securiticrat said "IT", but I remember "IT": "Collect it all." If it can be collected, it will, by someone somewhere and more likely by multiple players with distributed resources. Privacy is dead. The new fight has to be ensuring that such breaches are NOT used against us to "authorize" investigations, and ultimately disappearances (or even assassination)--especially for "pre-crime" "activities". Nineteen Eighty-Four was a training manual, don''t you know...


#3

Operations that occur in the dark, well under the scrutinizing eyes of society--particularly that of a purportedly Democratic society--have no apparatus FOR accountability. So long has this culture--operating on the dark side--arrogated to itself the "right" to assassinate world leaders, infiltrate organizations committed to peace and the greater good, and over the past 10 years collect an enormous body of data--that calls to rein in this monster are like holding up a cross to a legion of hungry vampires.

What is to be done with all the data already scooped up? And how is it, exactly, that alphabet agencies long inured to lawful practices will suddenly come to respect them? On what basis can they be trusted to give up what they've taken on the basis of quasi-legal agreements?

There IS an entity--call it shadow elites, the underbelly of the MIC, the Deep State, or whatever--that has become its own monster and the tools for putting this beast to rest, if they exist, are incredibly difficult to access.


#6

...Hi Mark...and just why is it that all of sudden the big players in the game are pushing for it to pass and become law? apple, google, microsoft and others? because their machines, OS's and web-sites are vacuums, recording and reporting machines pumping all of it into the dark side...they don't need a back door, they fear encryption and hide behind the curtain, they don't want to be held liable for any tid-bit of anything to become public...I haven't "googled" your name, no reason, I've posted the same thing elsewhere and have contacted others about this...I will more than likely disappear but who cares, I'm trying to get the message out and if it does then I've done my days labor. If you are who you say you are and have done the things you say you have done, you are a Hero.


#8

You are more than welcome...Snowden announced he's willing to go to jail(?), I haven't read anything about it but the head-lines...if he's willing to got to jail, there first must be a trail, correct, he is only accused not found guilty by a jury of his peers yet, it would be nice if you were one of the 12 chosen :-)))...truth, accountability equal justice in my world but then again I've been accused of being delusional :-)))


#9

Who knows what is planted in operating systems? I don't think there is any reliable way to keep secrets nowadays in the tech world. You can take steps based on what honest experts tell you - but they do not know what they don't know. The whole sorry affairs stinks to hell of dishonesty, subterfuge and a mountain of lies. I wonder if I am really writing this or if it's someone else...