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NPR Shreds Ethics Handbook to Normalize Regime Change in Venezuela

Originally published at http://www.commondreams.org/views/2019/08/06/npr-shreds-ethics-handbook-normalize-regime-change-venezuela

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NPR shredded the ethics handbook long ago. See, for example, the Criticism section of the Cokie Roberts Wikipedia page, if it’s still up.

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I think we need to start calling them by their adopted name: “National Propaganda Radio”, at least until they decide that their listeners are more important than their government handlers.

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Shameful. My charming wife listens to NPR, and believes everything they say. When I called out NPR on their Venezuelan coverage, she thought I was going conspiracy theory on her. She doesn’t want to listen to that, since NPR is “liberal”, it must be progressive and cool. She thinks I’m right wing for questioning NPR. Ronnie Raygun’s strategy of making NPR a corporate stooge worked very well.

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I’m curious: was there ever a time when PBS or NPR said anything to inconvenience imperial aggression? Seriously: can anyone think of a single example?

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During the early 80s I could walk to the studio of Austin City Limits. I learned so much about classical music from NPR. I trusted NPR. I don’t know when I became suspicious about their news because frankly, like so many others, I was just too damn busy to question it. Late in the 80s as the S&L bullshit hit the fan and NPR’s narrative differed little from MSM’s I became wary. By Kosovo, I knew. When they cited the Cato Institute and the Heritage Foundation to support Iraq/Bush Blunder II I positively blew my top. Well, you get what you pay for folks, and guess what–we ain’t footin’ NPR’s bill–not me anyway.

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I gave up on National Privatized Radio a long time ago when they were water carriers for the Bush Regime and its appalling “war” in Iraq. There are much better sources for real news than these sellouts. The same goes for PBS. I also live close enough to Canada to get the CBC on FM. They have succumbed to the same disease of “infotainment” as this country.
Our corporate media, as exemplified by this latest $1.4 billion merger, is a disgrace. I wonder how long it will take before our "news"papers look like the one that Montag reads in the dystopian film “Fahrengeit 451”. Its all graphics and crap while his wife, Linda, watches her “family” on the huge TV screen in the living room.

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One U.S. federal employee, a young Princeton graduate, at radio free europe created the Hungarian Revolution in 1956.

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I’ve been calling NPR, National Petroleum Radio.
Venezuela has oodles of sweet crude…the monicker fits, in this instance, quite literally.

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Can’t think of one.

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I was thinking National Fascists’ Radio, but yours and BeijaFlor’s will work.

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I’ve been waiting around for a disappointed NPR fan, outraged at the shredding of that sacrosanct ethics handbook in the case of Venezuela. I don’t want to sound like I’m making fun of the article: Koerner does a good job running down some history. I’m just mystified by friends of mine who still think NPR & PBS are somehow incorruptible, despite it all. Good lawd, remember that McNeil-Lehrer snooze hour?

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NPR and the snoozehour are a kind of comforting narcotic to older liberalish folks. The lack of outrage is because people long ago gave up on it and no longer see the point. I expect it will age out.

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National Pentagon Radio has been on the wrong side of every issue I care about for the past 50+ years. Once I found Pacifica in 1966, I couldn’t listen to NPR news from then on. How has it taken others such a long time to figure this out? But then, I guess I should just be grateful that more are finally awakening.

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I quit listening to NPR when I realized the station gushed imbeded pro war propaganda, circa 2002.

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NPR shredded any “ethics handbook” long ago. I’ll never forget actually getting a personal call back from the NPR ombudswoman at the time (intentionally forgotten her name) who was apparently impressed enough with my voicemail she felt the need to defend herself. My call was regarding her “guidance” at the time to NPR talking heads not call torture TORTURE. This was after everything had come out about systematic torture engaged in by those in the Bush Administration and military. This was at the time that NPR gave the two psychologists who actually helped formulate the torture program unopposed interview time (certainly unopposed by the NPR talking heads that didn’t utter the word “torture”) to defend their actions in having formulated the program and indeed witnessed themselves torture happening while they were present (that didn’t come up in the interview of course but there was credible reporting of it at the time)

I had a civil conversation with the person defending herself (yes ironic), and she made her case for a good 30 minutes on the phone while I repeated my critique like a broken record. She was quite annoyed with me.

One of the best phone calls I’ve ever been a party to.

Cluck.

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“The trend could affect revenue for NPR and its member stations.”

One can only hope.

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“Enhanced interrogation.” You know, like interrogation, only better.

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No kidding…a few that were runners up but didn’t get the catapult…

fortified
fun sized
super duper
dope
gnarly
unconventional
radical
distasteful
ungodly
cruel
criminal
illegal
sick
hideous
vile
and several others…

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Yep. I stopped listening to NPR when they began to feature “color commentary” on the Iraq War from retired Generals.

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