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NSA Global Spy Stations Revealed: 'Sniff It All, Collect It All, Know It All, Process It All, Exploit It All'


#1

NSA Global Spy Stations Revealed: 'Sniff It All, Collect It All, Know It All, Process It All, Exploit It All'

Jon Queally, staff writer

A new batch of Snowden documents offer an unprecedented look into the close relationship of the surveillance agencies of the so-called "Five Eyes" nations and how a close look at a secretive base in New Zealand reveals new details about a global network of listening stations are operating to fulfill the NSA mantra on communications data which says, "Sniff it all, collect it all, know it all, process it all and exploit it all."


#2

Stupid questions: Is everyone under surveillance including the oligarchs, politicians and spies themselves? Or are the powerful and therefore the most dangerous exempted from surveillance? Can the people spy on the spies?


#3

Duplicate post.


#4

Are you kidding?! That's how the whole thing got started in the first place, the paranoid royals snooping on one another. All governments do it, they just don't admit it publicly. Heavens no!

There's the old adage about 'intelligence' being the second oldest profession in the world, with fewer morals than the first.


#5

Dear NSAbbey, My girlfriend seems distant and has begun 'going out with the girls' weeknights. Is she cheating on me? Signed, Only Happy On The Weekend.

Dear OHOTW, Your girlfriend, Susan S. Elber, is having an affair with James L. Richards. She's puzzled about why he's only available during the week and recently texted her BFF, Nancy V. Perkins, with, "Could he be married?" He is. Nancy, in a conversation with workmate, Alice D. Smith, said she was going to tell you about Susan's cheating when you and she hook up on Wednesday. What she doesn't know is that Alice is James Richards' sister-in-law and she's already spilled the beans to her sister. Our predictive behavioral software anticipates a confrontation that will result in your regular girlfriend coming home early on Wednesday. If you and Nancy are in bed in your apartment, as you were on the last three Wednesdays, you're likely to get caught when Susan comes home. I recommend you meet Nancy at the Lazy Daze Motel, as you did 5 weeks ago.


#6

What concerns me is snooping democracy, not the paranoid royals snooping on each other. Its their snooping on us and us not being able to snoop on them.


#7

Clever satire. Well-done.


#8

I have a relative who works for a cell-phone tower company and she told me that the upper portion of each cell phone tower is owned or reserved by the U.S. govt... in case anyone wondered how logistically, the goal for vacuum-suctioning ALL communications--including those of innocent civilians GUARANTEED by the Constitutional/Bill of Rights THE RIGHT TO PRIVACY--was being executed.

Also, this sicko "Information Control" and "Information Retrieval" is straight out of Terry Gilliam's ingenious satire, "Brazil."


#10

Thanks! Good to see you!


#11

If we exploit everyone in the world, and use the larger half of the world's military to oppress them, it is understandable that the beneficiaries of those exploitations would be extremely paranoid, and know in their bones that someone somewhere will figure out that the larger half of the world's military deployed to "keep the peace" really means keep the subjects quiet about their subjection.

It seems to work pretty well for the most part.


#12

One would think with this kind of technology that organized crime wouldn't stand a chance? Considering how well organized crime is doing, all this technology amounts to diddly squat.


#14

There is no right to privacy, although the principle "We the people..." once enjoyed, was covered by several tenets of the Bill of Rights, however, the Constitution for the United States of America has been sidelined by the PATRIOT Act. Presently, there are no protections.

Note that domestic spying is the domain of so-called democratic nations.


#15

Seems to be pretty much the "beginning" of the end of democracy, as this technology plays right into the hands of the flag pin bedecked politicians who are charming us to our (not their) demise.


#16

This presumes that these spy agencies would be opposed to organized crime, when that is, in fact, their modus operandi. Whether it be drug running, prostitution, extortion, racketeering, money laundering, kidnapping, torture, or murder, these agencies do it all or farm it out when that's more convenient. Their private cousins in crime are role models, partners, and useful resources. Why would they ever want to give that up?


#17

Do these spy kids know who there true masters are?. I sure they think it's they're country, their government, but then who is the government if not the corporations who's only concern is their bottom line. I'm of the opinion that organized crime, sadly, rules the world. Maybe not all of it, but most of it. They have the competitive advantage. They pay no taxes, follow no laws except their own and can offer a deal that not even the spy boys can refuse. If I was a billionaire crime boy my aim would be these security organizations. Considering how corrupt everything is. They've won.


#18

Outtacontrlz ... relative to the actual state of the planet ... that pretty much sets the scale. Thanks for the smile !


#19

No, it works very well. Organized Crime Inc. owns it!
;-})


#20

Smh This news just shows the Orwellian system.


#21

Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
;-})


#22

The main problem is that you cannot tell them that you will not give them any information. They've downloaded virtually everything you and anybody else has said or written and it is probably stored in their database before it reaches the intended address.
* You can refuse to respond or confirm, even under torture, but if it is something important, they've probably got it already.
* I don't know if we've already passed the point of no return, but if not, we're pretty damned close.
;-})