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Oligarchville: How Washington’s New Rich Live


#1

Oligarchville: How Washington’s New Rich Live

Mike Lofgren

In 1927, H.L. Mencken rode by train through the Pennsylvania coal country. The houses he saw along the way were so hideous, at least in his eyes, that he was moved to pen his famous essay, “The Libido for the Ugly.” Mencken was writing about towns inhabited by coal miners and railroad brakemen, but what would he say if he were to visit present-day Washington, DC and take a stroll in its surrounding suburbs?


#2

Don't talk to me about New York, San Francisco, and Washington D. C., as great cities, they're not, they're gawdy versions of Disney World for the rich. No one leaves their heart in San Francisco, no one, the critters there are heartless. I have no desire to ever step foot there, or the bloviated New York with its eastern snobbery, who needs it? This article says enough about D. C., a bebrooched swamp. Give me places that welcome people, all peoples, of every stripe, that is what makes a great city. These are Hillaryopolises.


#3

"just a pity they have such bad taste" More a pity they are not incarcerated.


#4

" It is less well known that the $4 trillion spent since 9/11 on the war on terrorism."

Tell me again that 9/11 was not a con job! Cui Bono! Follow the $$$$$$. The Governments fairy tale needs to be challenged and the culprits that murdered 3,000 of our fellow citizens, in cold blood, need to be brought to justice. This cover up must be exposed; otherwise, it is just a matter of time until this same cabal of these most egregious war criminals will strike again.


#5

Marvelous prose! (The Liberace reference, in particular.)

"The structures resemble the architecture of the Loire Valley, Elizabethan England, or Renaissance Tuscany as imagined by Walt Disney, or perhaps Liberace. As with McMansions everywhere, the new owners could have gotten a much sounder design for the same price or less, but they prefer the turrets, porte-cochères and ill-proportioned Palladian windows that they bought, and accent the whole monstrous ensemble with the obligatory Range Rover in the driveway."

I ordered Mr. Lofgren's book on the "Deep State" which I anxiously await. Just got my copy of "Dark Money" by Jane Mayer.

What would citizens do without authors/sages/researchers like them?


#6

Conspicuous consumerism at its obscene worst. This is how the spiritually dead try to make themselves feel alive: accumulate stuff, parade it in front of each other, congratulating themselves on how these particle-board McMansions trumpet to the world their superiority. The social Darwinist's favored fantasy. Losers, each and every one.


#7

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#9

My son served an internship in the Washington, D.C. office of a senator (D) for one semester of college credit. He was not paid and lived hand-to-mouth and worked nights and weekends as a lifeguard at the Walter Reed Hospital pool working with returning injured veterans. He saw economic inequality in all its ugliness: limos bringing Senators and Representatives to/from "work" each day with the passengers literally stepping over the homeless on the streets outside the bistros where they had lunch or cocktails or fundraising soirees. The fundraising events (the Republican ones were decidedly banquets of gluttony and held with regularity and he only observed one Democrat event, which was much more modest) had copious amounts of food including lobster, prime rib, shrimp, French haute cuisine, imported delicacies, pastries, etc. that pretty much went to waste while the attendees preferred to partake of the open bars instead. When my son was invited to these events by a friend who was a staffer in some Repub. Sen or Rep's office, he would take as much food as he could out to feed the homeless and to ensure that he at least had two full meals a week. The stark contrast between the haves and have-nots made him heartsick. He does all he can to address this inequality but it is hard for him while working two and sometimes three jobs to barely make ends meet. The gentrification is not confined to the mega metropolises...it is everywhere, sad to say.


#10

Exactly.


#11

Nancy Pelosi's voting record confirms that she "left her heart in San Francisco" when she was elected to Congress.

The only difference between DC, NYC and SF is that NYC and SF felt the 2008 meltdown, at least for a brief period, while DC's K Street influence peddling and corporate welfare industries never missed a beat, and the crowd the author describes would be surprised if you told them there was a recession.


#12

http://www.rew.ca/properties/R2026974/2276-w-15th-avenue-vancouver?property_browse=kitsilano-vancouver-bc

This a picture of a home listing for 2.5 million here in Vancouver BC. Even adjusting for the exchange rate of .72 this comes to 1.8 million US.


#13

Your son sounds like he was raised to have a good soul, you should be proud. As to the article; all empires rise and fall and this empire is coming to a close. And may people such as your son be the builders of a better world.


#14

Golly, how did Great Falls, Virginia escape the writer's notice? While McLean may have large mansions, they are paltry compared to the super gigantic mansions being built in Great Falls. Recently, tne wealthy owner of a local "sleep clinic" cut down a virtual forest of trees in order to builds a replica of Versailles! Truly, it is all unimaginable.


#15

Conspicuous corruption


#16

And all with no acreage, which makes the price even more outrageous.


#17

Great Falls, VA income stats:

Estimated median household income in 2013: over $200,000 (it was $159,695 in 2000)
Great Falls: over $200,000
Virginia: $62,666


#18

"Hillaryopolises." Priceless.


#19

A relative of a friend of mine lives just outside Alexandria on an old family estate with substantial acreage, a stocked fishing pond, walking and riding trails, etc. Neither has ever mowed a lawn, washed a dish or clothes, or cleaned house as the "staff" take care of the drudge work. And, of course they have another home on some lake or river where they keep their sailboat and fishing yacht...and they are retired. Guess it pays handsomely to be born into money and then make more in finance/commercial lending/real estate. The wife has never been employed (she was only 18 when he married her...his second marriage and he was 40 at the time...but she rapidly became the Southern belle and charity madam...soft spoken, demure, and so very condescending and has never turned back...he is quite old now so she only has to hang on for a few more years).


#20

No ; that's only for the proles !


#21

Your son sounds like a real mensh . If there were more people like him, with his unsparing observation and compassion for the homeless , this country would not be in the terrible shape it is in today .
How sad that all those wasted cornucopias of food couldn't be packed up after the event and delivered to homeless shelters and food banks .