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'On Borrowed Time': Human Activity Puts One in Five Plant Species at Risk of Extinction


#1


#2

We would like to thank the creators of breathable air, Plants!

Plant communities are the basis of life.


#3

The bountiful Earth passes and even its potential gifts of new medicines are being lost. That cure for cancer that awaits discovery in that unimportant looking tiny flower. The fountain of youth that is hidden in the genome of that lowly weed. It is just another weed and there are plenty of other weeds ... But only one contained that substance and it is found in only one place on Earth. Those few plants that have survived are threatened by the construction of a supermarket parking lot and by conservatives who sneer at saving weeds.

We should be smarter than dumbing down slogans that take us for fools. We should be scientific enough to understand what might be lost with each plant species that goes exinct. We should be smart enough to know what we are losing.

We are losing the Bountiful Earth and will have only the Anthropocene Earth to replace it.


#5

Beyond what plants can do for us and they can do plenty, they are an integral part of the web of life here on this planet.

I see it here in MO where cattle men rule. Great swathes of mixed hardwood forests razed and a multitude of amazing and healing plant life endemic to the ecosystems brutalized and treated like just so much trash so cattle can run the areas left and tear up the water sheds. What humanity consumes has a great deal to do with how native plant life fares on this planet. Personally I choose to leave animal products alone as much as I am able in order to give the native plants some room to live and prosper.


#6

Well said. :kissing_heart:


#7

The cattle operations in Southwest Missouri are giving way to poultry and hog CAFO's, and extensive cultivation of GMO corn & soy. These, too, lead to more clear-cutting as well as removal of thousands of acres of established wind breaks that are cut to facilitate the conjoining of consolidated smaller farms into massive corn/soy plantations. The habitat loss in the region is extreme and largely ignored by the populace. Apparently the Show Me state hasn't quite seen enough to know there's a problem.


#8

Thank you. From the heart.


#9

The Signs keep appearing. So many signs that it is difficult to see the signal from the background.
So many signs that one can become complacent & immobilized.... What will you do? How are you getting prepared?
Do you see the direction that things are going?.... newmessage.org.

We humans are completely dependent upon our ecological support system---that of which is under great stress and within great danger of collapse.
What will you do? How will you prepare?


#10

Luckily, some of SW MO is very hilly and rocky i.e. the Ozarks but you are so right about the flat and bottom land areas. Big GMO plantings and now incursions from the Tyson type operations are abundant. The big hog operations have been here for a while. This is an area that once had small diversified farms aplenty. But like many areas, agribizz has done it's dirty work. And Monsanto is home based in St. Louis as you may already know.

As to seeing enough to believe there's a problem, like much of the rest of the country, demand calls the shots and cheap prices are seductive. Especially in a state that for the most part is low income. Most of us on CD know that the hidden costs with agribizz are phenomenal....all the elements fouled and health compromised for all animals not just us human types.

We can spread the word, lead by example, choose the small footprint choices and live like this all matters. Cause it does.


#11

Those prices are only cheap because you and I subsidize them in myriad ways beginning with crop insurance, price supports, et al. Missouri Representative Hartzler's farm had received somewhere around $750,000 in crop subsidy, and now, in office she's had the gall to cut school lunch programs, slash SNAP benefits, yet preserve and in some cases extend more farmer subsidies. It should be noted that something like 80+% of all farm subsidies go to the wealthiest 10% of operations! Amazing, is it not?


#12

I know of a good cure for cancer.... shutting down all nuclear power plants world wide... and we had better begin... because... it won't be long and there will not be enough people to actually do that shutting down...
What is it that they think they are going to "DO" about the extinctions of these plants.??? Stop civilization?... cause that is he only real solution... we can spit and sputter and pass laws.. .but the next door neighbors( meaning other states or countries) or the greedy bastards in business will find ways to skirt around them and cheat... Let's face it... as long as we have had an environmental movement... what have we really won?.... it's all still going down the tubes.... GETTING RID OF CAPITALISM would be a good start... and along with that industrialized society...
People think that, oh, too many people will die and there will be too much chaos if we do that... well, guess what, people are still going to die in the not too distant future, even if we do not get rid of civilization... and there will still be chaos... lots of it.... because no matter what... this world and these economic systems we have now ... will NOT ... BE ABLE TO FEED PEOPLE OR SUSTAIN PEOPLE FOR VERY MUCH LONGER....
oh, by the way... China is planning on floating nuclear plants... out to sea... add that to the mix...


#13

"Civilized" people are determined to have a "civilized" ending to our species and so many others: terminal nuclear war. You might also think of it as, "capitalism's last afternoon".

John Pilger 'A World War Has Begun':


#14

What We Have Yet to Learn to Mourn

Passings move so slowly
in our little time
the brief click of our sound
the mesmerizing notice
of our dreams.

We can not even begin to count
the catastrophe of loss that accompanies
every blessed little petal
last to drop
into the swollen river
of our wounded memory: life.

Here on this island
we wait to be inundated
by the very thing we were convinced
would forever feed us miracles
until we passed into our legendary shoal
of breathlessness, and hunger, and love.

I pressed flowers in a book of names
once when I had no abiding awareness
of death. Even birds would never go
until I stopped hearing whip-poor-wills
in the field across the road.
The elephantine trees shove over easily
in the smallest winds

each forest, every cathedral, a ruin
just the ghosts of shards, worn out prayers
where we worshipped and feared
what would not and did not hold.
What will we refuse to kill
in the end? How many undiscovered countries
rest in the prism of a sepal?

I will not last in this drowning
browning salt pan.
I cannot find the way around
the petri of permanent growth and the cancer
of my fears. Nothing will grow
around my hoard. The little roses
an old variety on the fence of a graveyard
in the ghost town
shrivel.

It is not because we die
that we lose these miracles,
but because we do not live.


#15

This article seems to be soft-pedaling the fact that close to 200 species are going extinct daily!


#16

Yup. Amazing in a disgusting kinda way.

And the USDA is doing their best to compromise the organic standards. http://www.cornucopia.org/category/action-alerts/