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Panama Papers Goes Live with Searchable Database of Tax Evaders


#1


#4

Student loan debt is a small fraction of Murkin medical debt and medical bankruptcy that continues to increase.


#5

Upon looking at the evaders, it was interesting that most were adversaries of the USA, but few within the USA> Very suspect as to who generated this. No Clinton or other important Oligarchy members.


#6

Not sure I follow the reasoning behind why they should have to do that.

Anyway, since about 2012 (i think) any US citizen or entity is supposed to declare their offshore accounts. In addition, once the money is brought to the US it will be taxed, hence the term "tax deferral". Tax evasion, on the other hand, has been illegal for a while.


#11

200,000 out of 11 million, a month later; plenty of time to pre-screen them to make sure that no real perpetrator is included.
If this was an honest release, they would have released 11 million of them.
As was originally explained by reporters of the Sueddeutsche Zeitung the mass of information was so huge, that you could not search methodically from one end to the other. Rather you had to enter specific names and search, if they were implicated.
Well guess which names were searched for? Assam and Putin. As bad luck would have it, Vladimir came out clean, but that did not prevent the western media to put his face prominently on most 'Panama' articles, because one of his supposed friends showed up on the list.

I could think of a whole bunch of names, I would search for, if 11 million documents were released, but I am confident, that not a single one of them will show up among the 200,000.


#12

Don't hold your breath. The exposure of the worst evaders, you are looking for, will not happen. See my post below. (or above) :slight_smile:


#13

Why is the legality an issue? For me the issue is which elite and leaders of countries, who are imposing austerity on the non-elite, because the governments are running deficits due to low revenues, are exposed as being prime causes of the low revenues. Legal or illegal is secondary in such a situation. Naming the names may give more power to those who wish to change the 'legality' of such tax machinations.


#14

Good question. I might suppose it is due to the ones you mention having made use of tax shelters in other locations, including the USA. If someone gets access to a list, such as the Panama Papers, but it doesn't show ones many are especially interested in, would the principled response be to not expose this list that may matter a great deal to people in other countries, simply because if failed to expose the Americans? Not sure if that's what I would do or recommend.
Could such a list encourage others to take a look at the BVI, Cayman Islands or Delaware? Seems a distinct possibility.


#15

It's an interesting question, Andrew. It echoes the assertion that none of the bankers behind the 2008 financial meltdown ever broke the law (dispelled by Charles Ferguson's "Inside Job" and "Predator Nation"). Remember that many of society's protections (like Glass-Steagall and campaign finance restrictions) have been methodically dismantled by the .1 or .01% in the past couple of decades.
The essential point is that by moving funds offshore, these folks have broken the social contract with those who have not, who are thereby suffering. If it's not illegal, it should be. And if we achieve any real transparency, it most likely will be.


#17

Most of the people here will realize, but they are the intelligent, but unfortunately in a minority position. The vast majority , if they notice it at all, are long ago conditioned, will dismiss it, as nothing they can do about it and go back to watch some undemanding light entertainment on TV.


#19

I am rooting for you to be right!