Home | About | Donate

Paul Ryan, Iron Stache, and How #WithaBuckFiftyAWeek Was Born: A Short Story


#1

Paul Ryan, Iron Stache, and How #WithaBuckFiftyAWeek Was Born: A Short Story

Jon Queally, staff writer

Republican Speaker of the House Paul Ryan was pilloried overnight and into Sunday morning after posting a tweet on Saturday—one he later deleted—bragging about the $1.50 per week a public school employee was "pleasantly surprised" to find in her paycheck following the passage of last year's tax cuts which gave the nation's corporations and richest people cuts worth millions, and in many cases billions, of dollars.


#2

I could be wrong, but I THINK I started the hashtag, #WithABuckFiftyAWeek . I was just pissed last night over the completely clueless, vapid, “suck my d***, secretaries are PRAISING me for their $1.50 a week!” attitude coming from Speaker Ryan. I originally started tweeting with the hashtag just to list what $1.50 cannot do for you, then realized it’d be really fun if Paul Ryan got really sick of seeing his own name.


#3

This photo is a wanted poster for three very bad criminals.

They are wanted for crimes against peace and humanity. Paul will also be tried for war crimes.


#4

$1.50 and $1.4Billion.

Ryan has no right to represent any other human being if he cannot see the inequality and total absurdity in the difference of how this Tax Scam affects working people.


#5

Don’t confuse reduced withholding with tax cuts. Yes, the Kochsuckers ARE getting tax cuts in the billions, while Julia Ketchum’s “1.50 per week tax break” story falls somewhere between misleading and fake news.

Ketchum and other wage earners do not currently know how much of a tax break she or they will be getting. The $1.50 is not a “tax break”, it is nothing more than a reduction in withholding from her most recent pay check.

Wage earners and fixed income retirees are all getting withholding reductions…nobody asked us if we wanted them…we are just getting them and they will not equate to tax cuts. We will be paying that money back when we file our 2018 tax return in 2019, after the 2018 election is history.

On top of paying back the $1.50, some of us will pay the IRS a penalty for not having enough withholding during 2018. I have already handed my employer a revise W-4 to increase withholding so I won’t end up paying a penalty next year.


#6

In the above picture: THE POLITICAL, AXIS OF EVIL!


#7

Recall Dubya’s 2001 tax cuts where every Murkin who filed a 2000 tax return received a check in the mail worth a couple of hundred bucks…no direct deposit allowed…the DC marketers wanted voters to feel those checks in their hands. Every major US retailer then gave us a 10 to 20% discount on a shopping spree if we cashed the check at their establishment.

Between now and the November election the DC marketers will continue to bombard us with misleading and fake news to convince us that December’s Inequality Exacerbation Act (IEA) disguised as tax reform is the greatest thing since sliced bread.


#8

It’s degrading, but this article makes it look like (and I would say accurately, too) that the issue will never go beyond scoring points for either political party. The R’s don’t give a damn about commoners, but will go to great lengths trying to make their butt-drilling look like a win for those whose memory will last until Nov 2018. On the other hand, the D’s don’t give a damn about the commoners either, but will take advantage to point out the evil’s of the other party only to try to make it look like they care.

If the D’s cared, would they limit their battle to a back-and-forth on twitter? You can point out that this doesn’t mean they aren’t fighting on the floor, but MOST of what I see is a “nya-nyah”-fest gloating about the mis-steps of the other party, in tweets, in town hall meetings, in opinion articles.

When Obama started out, his big deal was giving trillions to the ultra-wealthy. He called it bail-outs and said that the economy would be destroyed, even for us commoners, if he didn’t do it. When Trump started out, his big deal was a plan (now in effect) to give trillions to the ultra-wealthy. His party puts a spin on it, too.

Can we really feel good because a couple of Dems scored some PR points for pointing out that Ryan is a jerk?


#9

Politics is not a spectator sport. Political parties don’t sit up in some inaccessible ethereal place or something, the way, say, professional football teams do. They are membership organizations made up of members. If the “D’s” don’t give give a damn about commoners, it is because the commoners are not getting involved with the D’s. Check out your local county democratic committee and organize a group of like-minded wage-earning friends and acquaintances to start showing up at meetings. Yes, it is going to be intimidating at first as most of the people there are going to be rich yuppies. But stick with it, and keep getting more people to the meetings.

And, for now, send something to the the working class commoner Randy Bryce so he, hopefully along with many others, can change the “D’s” for the batter at the US Congressional level. And no, be prepared to hear things from Randy Bryce that you don’t agree with. For example, like most white union workers in the rust belt, he is pro-gun and pro-military. But politics is always about making compromises. Radical change needs to happen too, but it is more likely to happen when workers have their basic rights (a union, a living wage, and guaranteed healthcare) taken care of first, so the cost of getting involved in radical street-level change does not cost them so much.


#10

I started out this way, and it goes beyond being intimidating. The head of a local committee told me that while she respected the ideas, recent party reform made it top-down–the top dictates to the bottom what the agenda and ideas are going to be. This was Massachusetts and I quickly joined the Greens, which was an actual political party. Yeah, well, you either have a voice in a party with no power or you belong to a party with power but have no voice in it.

The last 3 years has made it clear that a lot of people who have been with the party for years, many who actually had some authority with the Dems, have become cynical, or have been essentially kicked out of the party for not agreeing with the ideas handed down from the top.


#11

Amen. I said a few weeks back that folks here should read about how evangelicals became a force within the Republican Party. It didn’t happen overnight, but was a long process. It wasn’t one where they took their toys and went elsewhere when things didn’t go their way. Guys like Falwell recognized becoming a base of a major party was the key to power and they worked to gain control of it at the local level in states across the US. They gained power because their people gained power, which made the party more conservative.


#12

Geeze, should I be grateful for receiving a $36 a month increase in my SS of which $34 goes to Medicare so that means $2 a month in my check. NOT

But I am grateful to myself and my government for creating SS and Medicare and I paid into it since I was 18 which is over a 50 year period. Think of the interest earned for 50 years which I was taught in grade school the huge benefits of savings and compound interest.

I’ve never not wanted to pay my fair share of taxes and greatly appreciate Medicare and hope that Medicare for all will be given to all citizens.


#13

I’m not a fan of contributions to other district’s or state’s politicians, but this one is a little different. I upped the ante a bit and sent $15 to Randy Bryce for US Congress…


#14

OK, that worked for the religious right, which is a huge special interest group with immense funding. I don’t think the same approach works for ordinary voters who have nothing but what they have to say.


#15

Yup, they are representatives of the United Snakes…


#16

But it wasn’t in the late 60s, early 70s. They were the people who felt ignored by the party. You should read up on it, there’s many books on the subject. Orange County became a base for religious conservatives (we see it as normal today, but they weren’t normal at the time) here in California because local leaders began taking over county offices and booted out a non-Reagan Republican moderate legislator in the 60s. This was repeated all over the country, slowly, in the late 60s and early 80s.

Parties change. Just read how the Democratic Party changed after civil rights activists couldn’t be ignored. Did that happen by magic? What I see here on CD is stuck-in-the-90s PTSD on full display, way too much.


#17

I wonder how they’ll convince people the tax bill is great when three months later, we can see for ourselves that we’re paying more, not less.


#18

Well, I did not say it was going to be easy and there are failures, and will be more failures, all along the way. But I still perceive the left efforts to take over the Democratic Party as “giving up” far more easily than the hard-right did, which reached their prominence today only through more than 50 years of steady organizing, with failures along the way, going back the the totally crushed Goldwater campaign in 1964.

Now, to be sure, organizing on the hard-right, is far easier because they are not challenging the capitalist economic syatem like the left is. But surely, it is still easier to take over an existing organization than start a new one from scratch - as the disarray among the Greens in the US, and very limited successes in other countries (where they are not really a left party) has shown.


#19

You’re still talking about special interest groups, not individuals. If what you say is right, the conclusion I draw is instead of trying to be active in a local chapter of the Democratic party–become active in a special interest group that the Dems are afraid might bail on them. But the tricky part of that is any group that MIGHT pressure the Dems is going to get the response: “Ha! You got nowhere else to go!” We’ve already seen that.


#20

I love the way you think BUT…remember who is in charge. “Justice” is only for the peons.